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PlanetChristmas Magazine September 2014

is only 10 feet long, the thinner pipe is fine because it bends easier. If you are thinking 20’, 30’ or 40’ arch, go with the thicker pipe (called schedule 40 PVC) and a larger diameter. Your home center should have the 10’ pipe for less than $5. I kept thinking of Chuck saying to focus on the fundamentals I watched enough leaping arch videos to know the “leaping” is accomplished by light-ing small sections of the pipe in a sequence. Each lit section is a dedicated electrical chan-nel of an animation controller. Purists think of the arches as streams of water so they make a splash at the end. Since a leaping arch should be able to sequence the lights in either direc-tion, you need a “splash” of water at each end and that means two more dedicated electrical channels. I kept thinking of Chuck saying to focus on the fundamentals and then watched about an hour of display videos with leaping arches. The “splashes” were nice but it took me awhile to even notice them. Why worry about the splashes? No one said you had to. In the beginning, don’t worry about them. In other words: no splash is required. We’re keeping this really simple. How many electrical sections of lights do you need for this 10’ piece of pipe? That’s easy. Animation controllers tend to come in eight and 16 channel configurations. Divide your pipe into eight sections. Here come the important hints I’ve gleaned from now building a dozen of these ten foot arches. Divide each pipe into eight sections, 15 inches apart (15 x 8 = 120” or exactly 10’.) Every 15 inches use electrical tape to mark the pipe by wrapping a stripe all the way around. Why such a bold line? When you’re wrapping the pipe it’s much easier to know where to stop working on a section ( Light channels 2-4-6-8 turned on see picture on the next page.) September 2014  |  PlanetChristmas  33 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


PlanetChristmas Magazine September 2014
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