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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
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  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
judyindisguise

Frozen to the Ground

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I knew there was a problem the other day, when, upon entering my house, a friend said, "I was just talking to the Three Kings out there; they'd like to negotiate their hostage release back to their country!"

Yes, my blow molds are still up on my front lawn. This happens every year because I live in New Hampshire. During the weeks leading up to Christmas the cords get covered with layers of ice and snow, and then I can't get them up in a timely fashion because I'm worried about breaking them.

I know you folks in warm climates don't have this problem...but I'm wondering if there's some trick I'm missing that you cold weather folks can share with me!

DUH in New Hampshire....

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Judy, it depends on how bad they're frozen down. If it's just a thin layer of ice, a standard claw hammer will usually free them (albeit slowly). Just bash down along the wire, and then gently pull up through the now-distressed ice.

Another way to prevent this next year is to elevate you connections so that the extension cord feeding the mold is higher up in back of the mold. Then you can unplug the cord, move in the mold, and leave the extension cord there until things thaw out.

I have most my "infrastructure" under 1-2" of icy snow right now... My inflatables are still outside too, and you can't tell.

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Judy, I have been in your shoes before. The only thing that has worked for me is to rock the mold back and forth. Get the mold unseated from the ground. To get the cord out of the freeze, I start at the point where the cord comes out of the mold and start pulling it up. I have used a piece of rebar to wedge underneath and use like a fulcrum..it will come up, you just need to work at it a bit. Its pretty hard to break the cord completely, but I did have two where the outer covering did crack, so just go carefully and it will be fine. :D

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Judy, I have been in your shoes before. The only thing that has worked for me is to rock the mold back and forth. Get the mold unseated from the ground. To get the cord out of the freeze, I start at the point where the cord comes out of the mold and start pulling it up. I have used a piece of rebar to wedge underneath and use like a fulcrum..it will come up, you just need to work at it a bit. Its pretty hard to break the cord completely, but I did have two where the outer covering did crack, so just go carefully and it will be fine. :D

I would just run them over with the car. That frees them up pretty good.:giggle:

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These are great suggestions...especially about elevating the power source (I use those big extension cords that have three or four outlets in a little "tower" that you stick in the ground (those are frozen too). How would I elevate them...build a case....like the rack system for a PA?

And the stuff about the hammers....you guys are hardier than I! It can be frickin' cold out there crawling around with a hammer!!

I'd think I'd rather face the scowls of my neighbors and the jibes of my friends than do that! HAHA!

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I would just run them over with the car. That frees them up pretty good.:giggle:

Laughing out loud!

I did lose one this year, though. Apparently my husband thought it would be a good idea to shovel the snow off a snowman's hat, and the shovel cracked his whole head. Not my husbands....although I was tempted to do that! But the snowman's head. It was my oldest one, too...got it in 1992 when we bought our first house :(

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Laughing out loud!

I did lose one this year, though. Apparently my husband thought it would be a good idea to shovel the snow off a snowman's hat, and the shovel cracked his whole head. Not my husbands....although I was tempted to do that! But the snowman's head. It was my oldest one, too...got it in 1992 when we bought our first house :(

You must have wanted to kill him. I still have some blowmolds from when my kids were very young, mid 80's. I haven't used them in a few years but I still keep them.

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Judy, parts of my display are still up..so don't feel like you're alone. There is just too much snow and ice to do anything about it..

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Judy, parts of my display are still up..so don't feel like you're alone. There is just too much snow and ice to do anything about it..

Thank you, Carrie. I'm glad I'm not the only one!!

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Judy, parts of my display are still up..so don't feel like you're alone. There is just too much snow and ice to do anything about it..

slacker..........

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And the stuff about the hammers....you guys are hardier than I! It can be frickin' cold out there crawling around with a hammer!!

I'd think I'd rather face the scowls of my neighbors and the jibes of my friends than do that! HAHA!

I've torn down in -5 to -10 temps before. I'm really anal about getting the visible stuff down ASAP. This year I had to gulp really hard and leave more stuff out than I'm happy with, but you still wouldn't know we had a "big" display just by driving by right now...

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Okay Dan in NJ..you must have snow there. How do you get your stuff out of the snow and ice???

I was lucky enough to get everything in before it snowed! Lucky, lucky...

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slacker..........

My husband refuses to hold the ladder! He won't let me do the roof because there is so much ice and snow up there..so its not my fault!

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I've torn down in -5 to -10 temps before. I'm really anal about getting the visible stuff down ASAP. This year I had to gulp really hard and leave more stuff out than I'm happy with, but you still wouldn't know we had a "big" display just by driving by right now...

Only one of the many things that you are "anal" about.

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Gee wonder why.......?

Hey now..Dan, my toe is still broken (although its healing very nicely) so there was payback! :giggle:

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Hey now...this is getting a little nasty!! I didn't start this thread to be nasty!! And Chuck isn't even here!!

No no, Judy, Dan and I are friends..we're just kidding each other. When I was putting up the display this year, my husband was holding the ladder for me. Long story short, he broke his toe and it was "my fault" because I'm the one that does the display.

We tease and kid each other all the time.

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Hey now...this is getting a little nasty!! I didn't start this thread to be nasty!! And Chuck isn't even here!!

No it's not. Just a little inside fun. :giggle:

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You're all slackers. My display is torn down and put in storage until next year. Jeesh bunch of slackers. :P:p:p:giggle:

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Hey now...this is getting a little nasty!! I didn't start this thread to be nasty!! And Chuck isn't even here!!

Don't worry Judy. Carrie, Tim and I are all close friends, and we can even stomache Dano a little bit.

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Judy I use hot water in a watering can. If the mold is stuck to the ground pour water around the outside and it will flow down and melt the ice holding it down. Then do the wire the same way slowly pull up the wire as you melt winters icy grasp.

I will also state that if you display is like Carrie's with a few hundred molds your going to use a ton of hot water!!:P;)

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Gary, does the hot water affect your grass in the spring at all?

I'm always shocked how much thermal mass ice has. I've taken a propane torch to an icicle before -- doesn't even dent it.

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I would use a very large snowblower for frozen blowmold removal...But I do see a car was suggested which would work equally as well...

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