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mmulvenna

Artificial SNow Machine

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Here is the model of the snow machine I plan to make this year. It is modeled in Google Sketchup and then uses the scenes in sketchup to make the movie.

The video is a liitle slow so give it a few seconds

The basics are

  1. Blower will be from a large blowup.
  2. The large barrel has a pump which moves the snow fluid.
  3. The small barrel has a pump which moves the cleaning fluid. (probably pure vinegar)

    1. Plan to use tape water so the jets will need to be cleaned

[*]Each Jet has a valve to open and close the snow or cleaning fluid.

[*]Master valve to open snow fluid or cleaning fluid.

[*]All parts hidden in presents and Merry Christmas sign.

[*]All controlled by Renard controller.

Will start the build of the prototype in April.

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Cool design. So, the individual outlets on the sign will each have their own sock?

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Cool design. So, the individual outlets on the sign will each have their own sock?

Yes, they each have their own sock and control valve.

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Can you attach the skethup file? I'm curious to see the details.

Zipped file too large, send me a PM with your e-mail and I will be happy to send it to you.

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Can you attach the skethup file? I'm curious to see the details.

Files sent to your e-mail. What do you think of the model? Any thoughts or suggestions for modifications?

If anyone else wants the sketchup file just PM me. You can see all the details with the .skp file (pumps, electric cords, valves, barrels,Air Blower, fluid and air routes, Air diffuser, etc)

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I think it would be cool to have the four heads oscillate. Easy using a simple bar or rod linkage and a windshield wiper motor, or any other gear motor for that matter. Rather than hard plumbing the pvc for the air lines, just use dryer vent hose to the back of the heads so they can move. We use these same blowers and dryer vent hose for inflated 'claustrophobia' walls at the haunt and it handles the air flow just fine. Frankly, the 90's are pretty restrictive on air flow from the blower and it would be more efficient to have a straighter shot to the heads anyway... I know it makes it harder to hide, though..

attachment.php?attachmentid=30567&stc=1&d=1267887015

post-3431-129571204062_thumb.jpg

Edited by bhays

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Files sent to your e-mail. What do you think of the model? Any thoughts or suggestions for modifications?

If anyone else wants the sketchup file just PM me. You can see all the details with the .skp file (pumps, electric cords, valves, barrels,Air Blower, fluid and air routes, Air diffuser, etc)

The model looks great! A few comments/questions/criticisms:eek::D. Is there a reason to run two hard lines all the way up to the top? It seems that you could accomplish the same effect if you positioned the "T" fitting closer to the bottom and ran a single line, possibly a flexible one, to the top. Also, if I remember my principles of fluid dynamics, the pressure is going to be higher at the first nozzle along the line, then drop at each progressive one down the line. This is usually compensated for by decreasing the diameter of the feed line after each successive tap.

It may be more trouble than it's worth, but why not use a slightly larger diameter of pipe for your air supply, and run a flexible line inside of it for the fluid supply? I think you could probably use PEX tubing, or even regular vinyl or rubber tubing used for automatic ice makers and such. This would give you a "cleaner" look from the outside. Not having a great understanding of how these things work, would it not work better to point the nozzles up rather than out? It might give it just enough projection to really help it carry.

Last question is about the splitter piece at the bottom. I've never seen an off the rack piece that looks like this, is this something you are planning on custom making? You might find something from a pneumatic tube system that would work, but I think this is going to be an important aspect of maintaining an even distribution of air. (same principles apply to water and air, hence "fluid" dynamics)

I think I would move towards a single feed for both the air and the snow fluid and branch off from a center point then move out with decreasing diameters after each tap. Otherwise, I think you are going to end up with the first nozzle blowing like crazy and little to no outpout from the last nozzle on the line. Not being that familiar with these machines, I am making an assumption the the ratio of fluid to air is probably something that needs to be fairly uniform and adjustable. Perhaps a simple check valve could be added before each nozzle to allow enough adjustment to "fine tune" them once they are all in place.

Zach

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The model looks great! A few comments/questions/criticisms:eek::D. Is there a reason to run two hard lines all the way up to the top? It seems that you could accomplish the same effect if you positioned the "T" fitting closer to the bottom and ran a single line, possibly a flexible one, to the top. Also, if I remember my principles of fluid dynamics, the pressure is going to be higher at the first nozzle along the line, then drop at each progressive one down the line. This is usually compensated for by decreasing the diameter of the feed line after each successive tap.

It may be more trouble than it's worth, but why not use a slightly larger diameter of pipe for your air supply, and run a flexible line inside of it for the fluid supply? I think you could probably use PEX tubing, or even regular vinyl or rubber tubing used for automatic ice makers and such. This would give you a "cleaner" look from the outside. Not having a great understanding of how these things work, would it not work better to point the nozzles up rather than out? It might give it just enough projection to really help it carry.

Last question is about the splitter piece at the bottom. I've never seen an off the rack piece that looks like this, is this something you are planning on custom making? You might find something from a pneumatic tube system that would work, but I think this is going to be an important aspect of maintaining an even distribution of air. (same principles apply to water and air, hence "fluid" dynamics)

I think I would move toward a single feed for both the air and the snow fluid and branch off from a center point then move out with decreasing diameters after each tap. Otherwise, I think you are going to end up with the first nozzle blowing like crazy and little to no output from the last nozzle on the line. Not being that familiar with these machines, I am making an assumption the the ratio of fluid to air is probably something that needs to be fairly uniform and adjustable. Perhaps a simple check valve could be added before each nozzle to allow enough adjustment to "fine tune" them once they are all in place.

Zach

Great suggestions. I do agree with Chuck that the wind would negate any oscillation effect, which is why I did not model it that way.

Valve at each head was missed during the model, If you look at the PDF that I sent you will see that I originally planned for it.

I designed the double the double air flow so the air would get distributed more evenly. Not being an engineer, I thought that would work better than a single flow.

My commercial machine has been mounted 10 feet in the air and directed at the street, it blew the snow almost all the way across the street to the neighbors yard. Making some kind of adjustable joint at the heads is a good idea so they can be adjusted as needed.

Yes I planned to fabricate the "Y" myself. I have a plastic welder which I have been successful in using in the past.

I thought about running the fluid line inside of the air line(s) but discarded it out of hand. Maybe i need to rethink that.

Thanks again for all the positive comments. Keep them coming.

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Mike,

Looks good from what I can tell...

Don't glue the elbows on each outlet. You can direct them and maybe even switch them to 45's. Also I was wondering if the socks block the entire tube or if some of the air bypasses around the sock to increase the velocity to get the snow out farther?

BTW: can I get a copy of the PDF? You have my email...:P

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Mike,

Also I was wondering if the socks block the entire tube or if some of the air bypasses around the sock to increase the velocity to get the snow out farther?

I am pretty sure you need airflow both inside and outside the sock, the air inside blows the fluid into the bubbles on the sock and the air flow outside blows it off the sock.. without the outside flow you would just have a pile of foam rolling off the front of the machine..

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I am pretty sure you need airflow both inside and outside the sock, the air inside blows the fluid into the bubbles on the sock and the air flow outside blows it off the sock.. without the outside flow you would just have a pile of foam rolling off the front of the machine..

Absolutely you do and the design has that. You really need to see the sketchup file in order to see all the detail. The sock is not shown in the design.

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Mike,

Looks good from what I can tell...

Don't glue the elbows on each outlet. You can direct them and maybe even switch them to 45's. Also I was wondering if the socks block the entire tube or if some of the air bypasses around the sock to increase the velocity to get the snow out farther?

BTW: can I get a copy of the PDF? You have my email...:P

Files sent to you. The air diverter as holes for air on the inside and outside of the sock. The sketchup file will show the detail of that when you zoom into it. picture is attached is attached...

Like the idea of being able to move the head but they need to be air tight and still allow movement. Any thoughts?

post-947-129571204202_thumb.jpg

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I have responded to a number of requests for the files. I will be happy to send them to any/all that ask. Just send me a pm with your e-mail.

The files sent include some pictures of anticipated parts, a rough PDF sketch of the model and the detailed model in sketchup format (.skp).

In order to view the .skp file you need to have sketchup. It is free from google.

Thanks to all for the comments and suggestions.

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Glad you were able to get the blower to work for your project.

Terry

Terry,

Thanks a lot. Initial tests indicate that the blower I purchased from you will work fine. Thanks again for thinking of me.

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Mike,

To make the "nozzles" movable you could drill and tap holes for some stainless steel set screws. that way they won't come off. Do this only in the fitting on the outside to maintain seal.

Regular PVC slip fit fittings are slightly tapered and will seal without glue, as long as the pressure isn't too high.

To make the air adjustable you could make a damper in each of the tubes. To make the snow fluid adjustable you can use needle valves. This would eliminate the need for making custom size orifices to deal with the volume and pressure changes over distance.

What type of pumps are you using for the snow fluid? You may need to make some sort of pressure regulator/bypass, if you have pump issues (getting hot, over-pressuring, or impeller cavitation)

I was also wondering why you have the pipes for the cleaner and snow fluid run in parallel to almost the top? You could run just one out of your big present pump house. Tee them in together just at the top of the big drum. Also you could just get by with check valves at the top of each liquid tank. Then just turn on and off the pump that you want to run. The check valves would keep the tanks' liquids separated.

BTW good job with the SketchUp!

Edited by Toymakr000

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Mike,

To make the "nozzles" movable you could drill and tap holes for some stainless steel set screws. that way they won't come off. Do this only in the fitting on the outside to maintain seal.

Regular PVC slip fit fittings are slightly tapered and will seal without glue, as long as the pressure isn't too high.

To make the air adjustable you could make a damper in each of the tubes. To make the snow fluid adjustable you can use needle valves. This would eliminate the need for making custom size orifices to deal with the volume and pressure changes over distance.

What type of pumps are you using for the snow fluid? You may need to make some sort of pressure regulator/bypass, if you have pump issues (getting hot, over-pressuring, or impeller cavitation)

I was also wondering why you have the pipes for the cleaner and snow fluid run in parallel to almost the top? You could run just one out of your big present pump house. Tee them in together just at the top of the big drum. Also you could just get by with check valves at the top of each liquid tank. Then just turn on and off the pump that you want to run. The check valves would keep the tanks' liquids separated.

BTW good job with the SketchUp!

My old brain is not following you on the

"To make the "nozzles" movable you could drill and tap holes for some stainless steel set screws. that way they won't come off. Do this only in the fitting on the outside to maintain seal" need to think it through.

FLuid pumps will be a wet saw pump from HD. I used them last year in my commercial machines and they worked great.

Great idea on the fluid pipes and check valve. That also saves a solenoid valve.

As always thanks for the suggestions

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Terry,

Thanks a lot. Initial tests indicate that the blower I purchased from you will work fine. Thanks again for thinking of me.

Actually credit goes to Toymkr000 who suggested I contact you back on January 30. I was looking for ideas to use this and didn't come up with any so I thought of you and it all worked out. I am looking forward to seeing it in action.

Terry

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Actually credit goes to Toymkr000 who suggested I contact you back on January 30. I was looking for ideas to use this and didn't come up with any so I thought of you and it all worked out. I am looking forward to seeing it in action.

Terry

Gary comes thru again...thanks to both of you.:D:D

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Files sent to you. The air diverter as holes for air on the inside and outside of the sock. The sketchup file will show the detail of that when you zoom into it. picture is attached is attached...

Like the idea of being able to move the head but they need to be air tight and still allow movement. Any thoughts?

Question: As long as the total area of all the air holes in all the air diverters is smaller than the area of the blower opening does that not mean that there is a positive pressure there bye eliminating the need for the concern of the nozzles at different distances from the blower?

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Question: As long as the total area of all the air holes in all the air diverters is smaller than the area of the blower opening does that not mean that there is a positive pressure there bye eliminating the need for the concern of the nozzles at different distances from the blower?

In theory...Yes...In reality...Maybe...LOL:giggle:

It looks like your top fitting /nozzle is a PVC 90 ell. To make it movable, I suggested that you put 4 setscrews each 90 degrees from on another where the fittings overlap. That way you can adjust them and lock them back down.

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In theory...Yes...In reality...Maybe...LOL:giggle:

It looks like your top fitting /nozzle is a PVC 90 ell. To make it movable, I suggested that you put 4 setscrews each 90 degrees from on another where the fittings overlap. That way you can adjust them and lock them back down.

Daa...told you it was old age that did not understand:giggle:. Makes total sense.

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Today ran the air pipe and adapted it to fit the Blower that is modeled in the sketchup file. The blower not appear to have enough CFM. I base this observation on the amount of air deliver by this blower compared to the commercial blower on my existing snow machine. The blower has a 4 inch opening and I adapted that down to 1 1/2 in which is the size of the air diverter.

Tomorrow I will run the fluid thru it to see how the snow flies.

If this does not work my backup plan is to use the commercial blower from my true north snow machine.

.......Making progress.

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