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Tarheel Road

LED's that look like Incandescent

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I have used Incandescent lights for years.  I need to upgrade because I am pushing my power bill, pushing my electrical system and can just plain do more with LED's.  My wife doesn't like the totally different look of the LED's but everything that I am reading says that they make them that are very close to the look of Incandescents now.  I know that I need to look for LED's that have a color temp of 2700 to 3000 K.  But I cannot seem to find them anywhere.  Does anyone know a place where these can be purchased?

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Some of the full-wave vendors used to offer a color called "warm candle white."  Creative Displays may have been one of them.  I don't think they offer it anymore though.

I never used them myself, but they were advertised as a bit warmer than standard "warm white."  IMO, warm white seams just a touch too cool, but not by much ...it probably has more to do with the intensity and brightness of the LED than anything.  I find mixing warm white and incans outside still works alright, but I put warm white inside on a tree and the effect indoors was much to bright and cooler in color than the incan appearance.

2017 vendor links... http://www.highcountrylights.com/christmas-resources/pre-sale-info.html

 

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Thx,  I am a color light guy.  Everything I have read, they make color that look like Incand.  They just need to be between 2700 & 3000 K.  I just cannot find them anywhere and that is what I am looking for.

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The WalMart 100ct red/green/blue mini-LED's have a very incan feel to them. The blue's are much more vibrant than an incan blue, but it still looks great. They have a smooth finish to the bulbs, vs a faceted finish you find on most M5 LED's. One thing you might want to look for are "T5" bulb LED's. They typically have that smooth incan-like bulb finish, but unfortunately, finding them in individual colors is difficult.

If you're looking for C9's by chance, HLE's ceramic style C9 retros are the most incan-like C9's I've seen. They're fantastic. 

I've also found that getting C6 LED's help "dim" the LED's down a bit when mixing with incans. 

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LED's are not there yet. Vendors claim they look just like incandescent but they don't. I have hope because I found a C7 LED in Home Depot that is marketed as a night light that perfectly matches the traditional C7 ceramic white lamp. These LED lamps also have a glass envelope and not a plastic one. Now if they would just ceramic color the glass envelope - not paint but fuse the color with the glass like GE used to do in the late fifties thru the late seventies - they would have a winner. I even did an experiment and sent it to the LED manufacturer. They don't seem interested but someone who actually wants to revolutionize LED Christmas lighting will.

Go several more season with incandescents and then a true incandescent looking LED will be on the market.

Here's my experiment....

GE-Meridian.jpg

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I mixed a set of incandescent in with two led strings on my roofline this year and most could not tell. If you were looking close you could notice a slight difference. But you really had to look for it. These were Walmart brand for both. Warm white.

See if you can tell which is led...


81e81ddc8bed974a1262183345153d0b.jpg
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25-2700K warm white LEDs exist.  Why the manufacturers are not putting those inside the colored plastic globes/covers is truly beyond me.  I often hear fading as the reason, but properly colored plastic should outlive the lights themselves in that regard.
I was actually discussing this possibility with @hotrod1965 on youtube.  (lt1caprice57l - and yes, I'm serious about my willingness to pay for samples of such if you could get some.)

I bought these at Lowe's - they are GE Energy Smart C-6 lights.  They come in faceted warm white, faceted multi, and this style, which is by far my favorite of not just the GE LEDs, but all store-bought LEDs:
Y4kpjU8.jpg

Lights of any type, but especially LED, are hilariously difficult to photograph accurately - the color is less muted in real life, but the blue and green are not overpowering like they are with most LEDs.  And the white is very warm, much warmer than the photo would suggest.  Additionally, they are capacitor smoothed, which means they have barely any flicker at all.  You have to be moving your eyes quickly to notice it.

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On 12/15/2017 at 10:45 PM, Cullen Wassell said:

25-2700K warm white LEDs exist.  Why the manufacturers are not putting those inside the colored plastic globes/covers is truly beyond me.  I often hear fading as the reason, but properly colored plastic should outlive the lights themselves in that regard.
I was actually discussing this possibility with @hotrod1965 on youtube.  (lt1caprice57l - and yes, I'm serious about my willingness to pay for samples of such if you could get some.)

I bought these at Lowe's - they are GE Energy Smart C-6 lights.  They come in faceted warm white, faceted multi, and this style, which is by far my favorite of not just the GE LEDs, but all store-bought LEDs:
Y4kpjU8.jpg

Lights of any type, but especially LED, are hilariously difficult to photograph accurately - the color is less muted in real life, but the blue and green are not overpowering like they are with most LEDs.  And the white is very warm, much warmer than the photo would suggest.  Additionally, they are capacitor smoothed, which means they have barely any flicker at all.  You have to be moving your eyes quickly to notice it.

The GE C6 ceramic style is by far, hands down, no questions asked, the most classic looking LED Christmas light on the market. There's no comparison, pro-grade or big-box. It's unfortunate they're so expensive, but I load up when they go 50% off. Even at the $12.50/100 price, I think they're worth it because of how amazing they look.

 

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I bought some ceramic C9 led bulbs from HLE this past year and was quite impressed with the quality. I found that the red ones were almost dead ringers for their incandescent counterparts screwed in sockets side by side you could hardly tell them apart. Also their blues and greens had a high light output comparable with incandescents, but I actually like the rich blue of the led bulb more than its incandescent counterpart. I did however find that the orange and yellow leds had a much lower light output than the incandescents and sort of a "milky" look to them.

I am really curious how the new SMD ceramic led retrofits compare to these, I would love to see some pictures comparing these to conventional ceramic led retrofits and ceramic incandescents. Also most of my lighting uses C7 bulbs, and i am REALLY curious to see the ceramic C7 SMD LEDS lit up side by side with the C9 SMD LEDS as it appears from the specs that they both use the same .58Watt SMD chip so they should both produce the same light output...

According to what little info I can scrape up on the new SMD LED retrofit bulbs they are 33% brighter and use roughly half the power of our present day led retrofits, is this true? I know our local hardware store has a big liquidation sale on their non-dimmable C7 and C9 "consumer grade" LED retrofit bulbs, almost as if they know there is something new coming down the pipeline (SMD bulbs) for next Christmas and don't want their obsolete tech hanging around... Can anyone "enlighten" me on this new tech?

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55 minutes ago, Mikeymatic said:

I bought some ceramic C9 led bulbs from HLE this past year and was quite impressed with the quality. I found that the red ones were almost dead ringers for their incandescent counterparts screwed in sockets side by side you could hardly tell them apart. Also their blues and greens had a high light output comparable with incandescents, but I actually like the rich blue of the led bulb more than its incandescent counterpart. I did however find that the orange and yellow leds had a much lower light output than the incandescents and sort of a "milky" look to them.

I am really curious how the new SMD ceramic led retrofits compare to these, I would love to see some pictures comparing these to conventional ceramic led retrofits and ceramic incandescents. Also most of my lighting uses C7 bulbs, and i am REALLY curious to see the ceramic C7 SMD LEDS lit up side by side with the C9 SMD LEDS as it appears from the specs that they both use the same .58Watt SMD chip so they should both produce the same light output...

According to what little info I can scrape up on the new SMD LED retrofit bulbs they are 33% brighter and use roughly half the power of our present day led retrofits, is this true? I know our local hardware store has a big liquidation sale on their non-dimmable C7 and C9 "consumer grade" LED retrofit bulbs, almost as if they know there is something new coming down the pipeline (SMD bulbs) for next Christmas and don't want their obsolete tech hanging around... Can anyone "enlighten" me on this new tech?

 

I can say that the yellows look much better on the SMD's. That was the biggest improvement. 

However, for the ceramic bulbs, they don't really look brighter with a SMD. You can't see the 5 LED's any longer which is nice. 

I'll work on getting a video up of the differences shortly. 

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Here's my 2 cents.  I ordered 25 of the clear covered warm white SMD C9's from the Christmas light emporium, just out of curiosity, as I am searching for the LED equivalent to incandescent C9's.  They were very bright, with just the single diode in them.  The negative for me was the thinness of the cover.  It seemed almost like the glass of the incandescent bulbs.  I was concerned they would break too easily, and the way they were molded, seemed like they could allow water intrusion.  They were also slightly smaller than the faceted C9's.  I prefer the more robust feel of the faceted cover.  Just my opinion.  Anyone else tried these?

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