Jump to content
News Ticker
  • Christmas 2017 countdown has begun. Most people reveal their displays the day after Thanksgiving. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.

PlanetChristmas is getting a face lift.

Do the forums look a bit different?  We've refreshed the main theme.  Don't worry.  All your posts are still there.

The Blow Mold Expert

Securing molds in a better way

Recommended Posts

For years I've utilised the hole in the base of the blow molds and stuck other a yard stake in the bottom (if big enough) or used a 1/2" diameter fiberglass stake for ones with smaller holes like early TPI or Empire molds.  My problem is the place I went to get the fiberglass stake (that I use for 3/4 of my molds) no longer carries them and I can't find them anywhere.  The molds also rock easily in the wind using this method but don't tip over, it's just nerve racking watching your precious blow molds rock in the wind - I know we all can relate.  :lol:. I am looking for a better way to secure them that doesn't damage the blow mold.  I have heard multiple people that screw plywood squares to the bottom.  I have also heard of people who zip tie them to basic law stakes through the back light attachment, but with molds like polorons having the plate underneath, this doesn't work.  Last year I experimented by putting a dry wall expansion anchor in the small hole in the bottom of my TPI Shepherd boy, and screwing that to a plywood square. This gave the same security minus drilling holes in the bottom of the mold. However, not all blowmolds have holes on the base small enough for this to work and it was extremely difficult to remove.  Any better ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
qberg    115

instead of the 1/2 fiberglass why not use 1/2 rebar and cut it to the lengths you want?  The biggest cons I can think of is weight in the off-season and possibly rusting.

For my coro cutouts I use 1/2" pvc attached to the backs, pound the rebar in the ground and then my cutout slides over the stakes.  For bigger ones I use 1 1/2" pvc and the cheap wood marking stakes from lowes...same concept.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WLND-DAVID    90

I have a very few molds; a couple soldiers, couple candles and a candy cane.  Since all the lights are from the back and not the bottom, I just use play-sand and fill about 4"-6" inside the bottom of the mold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scooter1    5

We use 40 pound clear fishing line and a rod about ¼ inch in diameter with a 45 degree bend at one end.  Kinda hard to imagine but the rods came from an old artificial Christmas tree that the limbs would fold up into the tree for out of season storage.  We stripped the limbs of the greenery leaving the metal rod.  The rod was bent 45 degrees so it would attach to the “tree trunk”.  The rods are of various lengths which is perfect for the different sizes of blow molds.  We gently hammer the rod into the ground behind the blow mold and tie the fishing line around the blow mold and then tie the line to the rod.  The rods will get rusty over time but we did not paint them prior to their first use.  This works for us, does not require adding weight inside the mold nor fabrication of a wider base.  It also makes the blow molds easier to store!

We also have decorative fencing and wrought iron around the front porch that we simply tie the blow molds to using the fishing line.  We’ve not experienced any damage to the blow molds and even on windy days they stay upright.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Digger61    0

For the candles I own ( I don't own many blow molds.  Yet),  I drive a wood stake in the ground made from dowel, leaving it above ground about 8 to 10 inches, then slide a pipe over it, then slide the candle over the pipe.  The candles had holes in the bottom when I purchased them.  This works great for me, I can leave the wood in the ground if we have had snow or a serious frost to freeze the ground several inches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Big J Illinois    277

I am trying to devise a way to anchor 30 tin soldiers in my lawn. I would like to put 2 , side by side, any ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
slankard    49

I've just always used the 1/2 inch pvc pipe.  You're right in that it does rattle, but I can't say that it's ever damaged any of mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jfelix    6

I use fiberglass pole 1/2 from tractor supply for my soldiers. I just stake therm behind each one and use thin line tired around the soldier and the pole. They also have sand in them as well.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55cgas    21

I drive a stake into the ground, put the mold in front of the stake and tie it to the stake with a thin piece of wire. My molds don't budge in the wind at all, they are exactly in the same position when I take them down as when I put them up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×