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TBS99

Plywood Santa

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I just was given this vintage plywood cut out of Santa holding a lantern. The lantern does have a light in it. The gentlemen told me he made this from a pattern back in the 70's. He does not remember where he got the pattern from. It needs to be repainted. I was wondering if anybody has this pattern or knows were I might find one. If I can't find a pattern I guess I will just take lots of pictures and try to repaint it that way. I am not artistic at all, I have trouble drawing stick people. Any information would be appreciated

Thanks

Tom

 

santa cutout2.jpeg

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Nice Score! I would take a few good pictures and then paint the Santa white and then you could project the former image onto the plywood and trace the lines where the colors change.

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6 hours ago, Rynelson said:

take a few good pictures and then paint the Santa white and then you could project the former image onto the plywood

Exactly....I am no artist and that is how I did my Grinch set.  I am overly pleased with how well they turned out!  The biggest tip I have is make sure the camera isn"t angled when taking the photo of the original.  Prop up Santa vertical, hold the camera vertical, and have the camera about mid height.  These will all avoid distortion when you project the image back on.  I use a pencil while projecting and then a black sharpie to outline the areas...then start painting.  Afterwards I have been shooting them with multiple coats of satin clearcoat (many recommend flat) to seal up the paint.

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Agree with both Rynelson and qberg:  take pics and over the next few months, take your time and re-paint Santa.  I would also get rid of those cheesy lights around the Santa outline.  As another suggestion:  you can always leave the Santa as is:  patina is cool nowadays.  If you choose not to paint,  display the Santa with a soft, maybe red-dish spotlight next Christmas.  I wish people would give me stuff like that :rolleyes:

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I think its cool. You could paint him again, if the plywood is still solid. Or leave it as he seats:) I would use a LED spot light, to high light him. Or take the time,and remake him out of new product. I wouldn't mind having him in 2018's display. Way cool piece!

Edited by Big J Illinois

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2 hours ago, Rotatorman said:

ou can always leave the Santa as is:  patina is cool nowadays. 

I thought the same thing!  He isn't in bad shape from the pic...especially since he is 40+ years old.

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2 hours ago, Rotatorman said:

I would also get rid of those cheesy lights around the Santa outline.  As another suggestion:  you can always leave the Santa as is:

The cheesy lights were the first thing to go. There is a C9 bulb inside the back of the lantern, but the socket is disintegrating. I do like the patina look, and the plywood is actually in really good shape. I think I might just clear coat him to protect him more. I like the Idea of an led spotlight, but not sure if it would take away  the light in the lantern. The next nice day I am going to take a lot of pictures and dig out my old 36 inch printer  and see if I can make a pattern. I thank you all for your suggestions. Any other thoughts would be appreciated.

Tom

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4 hours ago, TBS99 said:

I like the Idea of an led spotlight, but not sure if it would take away  the light in the lantern

just keep the LED flood low power or use a filter and it will not overpower the lantern....you could replace the bulb in the lantern with the new flame LED bulbs.  I picked up one and put it in a Turkish lamp we have and it is incredible.   They only put out about 100 lumens so it is not a lot of light, but the flame flicker is really nice. 

You will definitely need some front light to show off the cutout.  I use LED floods on all of mine.

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If the wood is still solid, have you thought about sealing over all of it with some kind of polyurethane coating?  I know it's now for everyone, but I kind of like my older items keeping a vintage look. 

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Another method to save the pattern is to get a roll of wide tracing paper.  Any place that makes blueprints for architects & engineers will sell a wide roll of tracing paper and I'd imagine most art supplies stores too.  Simple trace the outline of the different colors and pieces, then transfer those lines onto a newly painted white surface.  Of course take pictures, like suggested above, for color match.

Good luck!!!!

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Whatever process you use to repaint I hope you keep the original artwork.  That is an awesome retro looking Santa!  Nice, very nice!  

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1 hour ago, donna123 said:

Whatever process you use to repaint I hope you keep the original artwork.  That is an awesome retro looking Santa!  Nice, very nice!

I will try everything I can to keep the original artwork. I really like this piece. I think I will try to clear coat him after taking a lot of pictures.

 

1 hour ago, Buckeyelights said:

Another method to save the pattern is to get a roll of wide tracing paper

I will look into this. I forgot to mention he is 6 feet to the top of the lantern and 38 inches at the widest point.

Tom

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if you do just apply a clear coat...test it in a small area first.  Paint has changed a lot in 40+ years!

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I picked up an old overhead projector that was auctioned off from a school, fixed it up and bought a few quartz bulbs for it. I make lots of plywood cutouts and use transparencies printed off on my old HP laserjet printer as patterns and then trace them out on the plywood with one of those large lead pencils made for kids. You can take almost any good picture of a cut-out and print it off on a transparency to get a pattern. Use a pencil to mark the plywood, if you make a mistake while you are tracing, you can erase it. I learned the hard way about not using marking pens to trace out patterns as the ink comes back to haunt you when you start painting the plywood.

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