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Guest jwcolumbus

stringing C-9's on the roof of the house

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Guest jwcolumbus

I saw a house that had C-9's on the roof, they had plastic "L" brackets that slid under the shingle and the light was attached onto the part that was sticking up. It looked very professional. Does anyone know where I can buy the "L" brackets at?Thanks!

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I dont know about L brackets, but I use typical gutter clips - which slide under the shingles with some effort. The ones I use are capable of holding any light size - minis, c9 or c7. I got mine at menards and they are about 2/box of 50 (thats at full price). They do create a nice uniform look on the roof and gutters for me and I would guess they are much cheaper than a metal product.

christian

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Beware those large "L" shaped white plastic inserts that slide waaay up under the shingle. They break the tar seal between shingle layers and can mess up your roof as time goes by.

I've always done eaves only (on U brads attached to the trim). My neighbor had a service come put his lights up and they used those white plastic inserts. Both of our houses were built at the same time.

He had to have his roof redone this year as he was starting to have some leaks along the peaks. ;)

And for the Love of all that is Holy, DON'T USE STAPLES SHOT INTO YOUR SHINGLES!!! I saw that on TV last month and it made the hairs on my neck stand straight up!

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I dont use anything that will even touch my shingles, what I would do if your house has a ridge vent is run a tie wrap through the ridge vent near each bulb the wit hthe flat part of the socket against the top of the vent, tighten the tie wrap around the cord nesr the socket, this would hold the light straight up along the top of the ridge.

if you dont have a ridge vent then you could fashion some angle bracket that would be attached at each end of the roof to the GABLE of the house and each section overlapped slightly with the other and bolted together, the bracket could be painted green, and the lights either clipped over the vertical edge of the bracket wit htheir own clips, or if the clips on the lights are backwards the lights couple be tie wrapped to the bracket using the bracket's holes...

just a couple ideas i had for it.

-Christopher

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eldoradoboy wrote:

run a tie wrap through the ridge vent near each bulb the wit hthe flat part of the socket against the top of the vent, tighten the tie wrap around the cord nesr the socket, this would hold the light straight up along the top of the ridge.

Do you have a picture?

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actually i dont have a picture.. I used C-9;s on my roof last year, but not this year. a ridge vent goes along the edge of the roof at the top, typically on most, if you look under it you can take a pice of wire and loop under the vent and back out the other side give you an easy way to attach anything to it.. basicilly looping the tie wrap under the vent. stand the light straight up and tighten down the tie wrap onto the zip cord right next to that bulb.. since the light sockets are flat on the bottom, they will typically stand up real nice, that said, in attaching C-9's straight up you most likely will end up tripping the GFCI in rain as water will get into the socket.. but its the best way to make C-9's stand out on the roof is having them pointed up

-Christopher

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Here in AZ, we all have the spanish tile roofs- the tar shingles just don't last in our heat here. I am very specific with the way my lights are done- each one MUST be pointed straight up, no exceptions. So- here's how I do it...

I staple gun on the side of the bulb into the trim board on the eve of the roof line. This makes the bulbs point stright out. 1-2 staples per bulb does just fine. On the roof lines themselves- I USED TO duct tape each side of every bulb down to the tile. This was a PITA job, but it worked and my lights always stayed pointing up. HOWEVER- this year, I bought 1x3 boards, and staple gunned the lights to the boards. I had to measure the roof lines first, then cut the boards down to size (this was my excuse for buying a chop saw! ;)) Then I just duct taped the light-boards down to the roof lines and I was done.

It sounds like a big job, and it sorta was- however, taking down and setting up in future years will take me, LITERALLY, 20 minutes. And that's every roof line on the house, front and back. It looks GREAT. I have yet to see anyone else do this, let alone line every roof line with every bulb pointed straight up. It looks very clean, professional, and classy. I can go snap some pictures of it if you're interested.

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Wehave always laid my C-9's on their side or hung them upside down to avoid moisture from entering the socket. We have a metal roof and we attached the lights to the roof using suction cup clips. Here is a picture of ours.

Eddie

post-220-129570986633_thumb.jpg

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I slide the tabs under my tiles with no problem. Sure it loosens the tar a little, but I have never had a problem. I only use the tabs where I have no other choice.

One good warm day and that little bit of spot is resealed again. Besides, water flows down not up. Not like you are actually stapling to the tile to create a hole on the surface.

Also, Most newer homes in NJ use the metal vent that runs the length of the top of the roof for ventillation. It has these small little holes in the lip, You can also use wire ties which I have found works well too.

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John Pidliskey wrote:

I slide the tabs under my tiles with no problem. Sure it loosens the tar a little, but I have never had a problem. I only use the tabs where I have no other choice.

One good warm day and that little bit of spot is resealed again. Besides, water flows down not up. Not like you are actually stapling to the tile to create a hole on the surface.

Just FYI, on my neighbor's roof. *Wind* was the culprit, not water. With the tar strips not holding the shingles to each other, a bad wind storm got under the shingle and ripped it off.

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I use binder clips from Staples (not sure if thats actually what thier called) I just put it around the wire and clip it to the shingle where it hangs off the side. Doesn't disturb the tar or put holes in anything. This is the first year I did that and it worked very well. I have icicles, but I imagine it would work with any style lights.

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Guest jmulls

15 years of experience now using 750 c9s to outine my house

Shingle clips... never a problem... if you break a tar seal... its not like tape it will reseat and secure itself in the heat of the summer... unless your roof is old and the edges are dry/curling up..these clips are ony an inch wide and if you place them where the seal is not ... you will be ok.

Lights facing up and water... Never had that problem ever... I have more problems with minis thn I do C9s

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Thanks! Just like I stated, Those clips should not have caused that kind of damage.

The Sun on a warm day reseals that little space. I can never use the same exact spot.

He had to have really torn up those tiles to get wind damage.

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azspecter wrote:

Here in AZ, we all have the spanish tile roofs- the tar shingles just don't last in our heat here.

I would think that the "all-in-one" type clips would work fine on the tiles. I use them to grip onto shingles but they will open up to over 1/2" wide which should fit the tiles.

TED

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azspecter wrote:

Actually- here's some pics...

Go here to see them all- http://tinyurl.com/y288ju

I have to say that I'm not crazy about having them point strait out. However I REALLY like the way you have them both on top the roof and on thefront (fascia boards). Nothing beats the good old C9s for outlining structures!

TED

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Well thank you! I appreciate that feedback. As far as the tile clips- they would work if I were just outlining the front of the house and clip them onto the tiles. They do not work for the roof lines, as the light bulb doesn't always line up with the edge of the tile- then there's no where to clip it onto.

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azspecter wrote:

Well thank you! I appreciate that feedback. As far as the tile clips- they would work if I were just outlining the front of the house and clip them onto the tiles. They do not work for the roof lines, as the light bulb doesn't always line up with the edge of the tile- then there's no where to clip it onto.

You are very welcome. I feel like we've started the C9 club here! That makes sense about the parts of the roof where the clips won't work. I was thinking about the roofline. By roofline I mean the front edge of the roof where you could have one bulb per tile in the center of the curve.

TED

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jwcolumbus wrote:

I saw a house that had C-9's on the roof, they had plastic "L" brackets that slid under the shingle and the light was attached onto the part that was sticking up. It looked very professional. Does anyone know where I can buy the "L" brackets at?

I think what you are talking about is "shingle tabs". I don't see them for sale in stores anymore (at least the stores I goto). Take a look at the link below for shingle tabs at All American Christmas.

http://www.aachristmas.com/vpasp/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=85

TED

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Ah yes, if you're using small shingle clips it's a big difference. The things my neighbor (actually the company he *hired* to string his lights, feh) were using were about 4 inches wide and five to six inches deep. that whole section slid under the shingle and it took about 5 seasons of doing that for it to leave shingles so the wind got to them.

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