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Randy

The Snowflake Extender Coro Project

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Labor day is almost here and I thought we'd work on one lastcoro project to incorporate into our display coming up in 2007...

I call it theSnowflake Extender.... :laughing:

Last year we had white snowflakes on our garage door, one snowflake in each of the squares (as shown in the attached photo. They wereall right, did the job, etc. This year I thought it would look better if we could add to or "Extend" the snowflakes with some coro and try to make the door panels a bit more interesting.

So the snowflake extender idea was born! It's a mix of coro, snowflakes, minilights, and LOR....Read on for more details....

Randy

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I wanted to design some coro panels that would cover up the squares on the garage door and introduce more items in the same space with more colors and the opportunity to animate the whole thing with LOR.

Wemeasured what the size of the coro should be to cover up the panels and be able to go side by side with additional coro pieces across the top of the garage door so it would look continuous.

We'll use the same style of wooden frame as our other recent coro projects. Brandon was excited about anything involving snowflakes and mini-lights....

So once the panel was cut out, we also cut out a large piece of paper the same size and started working on sketches and ideas. I started out with some Action Lighting snowflakes with red tips. The idea was to use minilights in the coro to build onto the snowflake with a different color that could be animated.

Oh, and dig the custom home made paint-can-stir-stick-compass to be able to draw big circles around the snowflake for reference points....

Randy

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Next up is a view of what the minilight "Extender section" will look like next to the snowflake. The attached picture shows the drawn-in "Arrow" on the left side. We used a protractor to match the angles of the snowflake.

The minilight punching dots are about 0.7 inches apart...We did the same extended arrow marks on all six sides of the snowflake.

Randy

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Next up is to add some stars to each side of the snowflake that will be a contrasting color...This is where the LOR animation will come in.

We'll be able to light up the snowflake itself, or the outside "Extender" portion (which sort of looks like a hollow snowflake), or either of the two stars...

We ended up putting one star on the left side of the snowflake down low, and then another star on the right side of the snowflake up higher. So adjacent panels could have some cool star animation (up-down-up-down along the length of panels).

Randy

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After tracing out the stars from the cutout, and then straightening the lines up, we punched the holes with the ever-so-handy Sears scratch awl...

Randy

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After stuffing the snowflake extender portion with green minis, and the stars with blue lights, here is what the panel looked like...

Oh, as an aside...After carefully planning eachstar to have exactly 50 lights so that we could use a string of Target mini 50s, I discovered during installation that one of the strings only had 49 bulbs (we counted 5 times and couldn't believe it!).

So after splicing in an additional bulb, we got the 50 holes filled.....

Right now the snowflake is just laying on the coro, but I plan on attaching it with cable ties...I also need to find a creative way to route the power cord so that is isn't quite so conspicuous...

Randy

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And here's a final photo in a more darkened environment that shows all the components:

The white and red snowflake, the green snowflake "extender", and the two blue stars....

Total cost:

Snowflake $14 Action Lighting (already had from before)

Target mini-lights: About $1.50 on clearance

Coro: About $4

Wooden frame: About $4

Total: About $23

We plan on putting 6 of these across the panels on both of the garage doors on the top row...So we'll be building some additional panels over the next few days...

We sure do love coro!!!! Any comments or suggestions? I'd love to hear them....

PS, almost forgot: See the lone green light between the "extender" portions of the snowflake? That was to allow us to get the lights from one "extender" portion to the next without splicing wire. I guess we could have just taped off those lights on the back, but I thought it gives some added geometric symmetry(!) to the whole design...

Thanks, Randy

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What a great idea Randy. I like the small blue stars how are you going to animate them?

Just think of all the decorating knowledge Brandon is learning, soon we will be seeing his projects on here.

Thanks, Jim

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Randy,

You amaze me with all you have done this summer. Your mind never stops creating! Great idea. Wonderful How-to.

Michael B

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Randy,

In the first post how did you attach the snow flakes to you garage door? I barely see a white cord going at a slant to the right. How are these attached and where are they going? Can you use your garage door?

Michael B

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Hi Michael,

The original snowflakes were attached with two screws. The first screw was at the top of the flake where there was a mounting ring. I chose screws that were long enough to go into the door and stick out enough so that the ring would rest on that top screw. The screw had a larger head on it so the flake wouldn't fall off.

Then I capitalized on the fact that the power cord comes out of the bottom for the second screw. The purpose of the second screw is to control the left/right movement of the flake. The second screw goes down into the garage door frame with a little bit sticking up and then I used a black cable tie to fasten the flake cord to it with just the right amount of slack so that the cord holds the flakestraight up and down.

I've attached aphoto to make it clearer. I also built signs with each of my sons names and birth years out of plywood. Much harder to work with vs. coro, especially the holes. I'll probably use thesigns for one more year, but then that coro has me getting itchy for more projects, so I'll probably do something next year to replace the name signs with coro...

Randy

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There are two doors (3 car garage) - 6 smaller squares across two doors on the top and 6 larger squares across the bottom. Yes, the doorsare wood, and once we got the display set up we couldn't get our cars into the garage because the driveway and garage were both full of display items and controlllers, respectively....

Randy

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Looks good. Just wait until Kathy sees these. Got to call her to look at this.They would be great for the falling snowflake effect or to lay on the roof with anchors to keep them from blowing away. What's the next project?

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Here's an "Addendum" to my posting since I've completed some more work with the snowflake extenders this weekend...

First, the frame construction...Here are photos of the top/bottom of the frame made out of 2x4 wood, as well as a photo of the sides that I have cut, slotted, and drilled. Ready to go to build 6 frames for my new snowflake extenders...

Randy

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And like your favorite cooking show, here are photos of the finished frame. Notice that I always paint the inside edges of the frame before putting the coro into it so it's easier.

I also use a bit of liquid soap in the slot to make it easier to get the coro in the slot. I use a soft rubber mallet to pound the frame edges in place and then drive in the screws...Six frames done, whew lots of work!

Randy

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