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J.D.

Metal Rod Supply

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I spent a few hours last night looking for a local (relatively speaking) supplier of metal rods (3/16" and 1/4"). The only supplier I could really find was in Wisconsin (http://www.speedymetals.com/- I live in Virginia). From their front page, I selected Round -- Steel -- 1018 -- Cold Finished. While their prices seem good, I'm worried about the cost of shipping, especially forsix-foot long sections. Do you know of other cheap supplies...

J.D.

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You should be able to buy it from any metal delaer in your area. Look up metal sales or metal supplies in the yellow pages. I foud one just a few miles from my house in Phoenix andI would guess you might be able to do the same in your area.

Good luck and Merry Christmas.

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Im liking pencil rod. It is 1/4 rebar available from local building supply stores, but not the big chain like home depot and lowes. they can probably get it though. its so small the protruding ribs arent even noticable. in south al it runs about 3.50 a 20' stick and its easy to work with. i build houses so it was easier then chasing down steel suppliers. good luck and Merry Christmas

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I haven't seen pencil rod around. I'll look at the local yards to see if I can find it. Does it break like re rod when you try to bend it? I've tried a few times to bend 1/2 re rod, not heated, and it has broken half of the time. I have an arbor press and a bending jig in my garage and it bends relatively easy half the time. So I've been using 1/4 cold rolled and that works great for small to medium size wireframes.

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I'm using 1/4 hot rolled. Unlike rectangular hot roll, the hot roll round rod has no mill scale. While hot rolled is rather annealed,the cold rolled will be partially work hardened. Here, the hot roll was about 40% cheaper than cold roll. So far I have had quite acceptable results, though I haven't done anything very large.

- Kevin

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I also usehot rolled 1/4 inch rod.

Costs me 2.12 for a 20 footstick,I usually buy 200 feet at a time and my supplier even cuts it to 10 ft lenghts so I can transport it.

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I talked to a guy on Friday night in Clifton, VA that make hundreds of wireframes and he get his 1/4 rod from :

Potomac Steel & Supply, Inc.

7801 Loisdale Rd. • Springfield, VA 22150

Phone: (703) 550-7300 • Fax: (703) 550-0397

E-mail: [email protected]

Tried calling them today, but they must be closed.

Mark

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toymakr, i havent had problems with it breaking at all. i can bend it in a vise to about a 100-110 degree easily. i havent built a lot with it yet as im just getting into the hobby. i want to try some cold rolled but ive only used this so far as its just lying around jobsites

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J.D. wrote:

I spent a few hours last night looking for a local (relatively speaking) supplier of metal rods (3/16" and 1/4"). The only supplier I could really find was in Wisconsin (http://www.speedymetals.com/- I live in Virginia). From their front page, I selected Round -- Steel -- 1018 -- Cold Finished. While their prices seem good, I'm worried about the cost of shipping, especially forsix-foot long sections. Do you know of other cheap supplies...

J.D.

Dude, This is where I buy all my wireframe rod. It's not that far from you- you really want to avoid shipping. http://www.potomacsteel.com/steelaluminum/ They are in Spingfield, VA.

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Pretty much everyone should have a local steel supplier near them. The one I use near me is Industrial Metal Supply - I've found that most steel venders have comperable pricing - as the steel is priced by the LB.

I have been using 1/4 cold rolled myself - it's worked well for me. Most of the time I don't do much bending - I tend to cut and weld.

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Pretty much everyone should have a local steel supplier near them. The one I use near me is Industrial Metal Supply - I've found that most steel venders have comperable pricing - as the steel is priced by the LB.

I have been using 1/4 cold rolled myself - it's worked well for me. Most of the time I don't do much bending - I tend to cut and weld.

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Bill V

What type of material do you make your wireframes out of ? I'm also new to this but am considering tackling building a sleigh (photo-ops) for next year. I want metal runnersbut need to be able to disassemble it for storage. I'm over inSterling and most of the places here seem oriented toconstruction supplies. Guess I'll have to make a run over to Springfield in a few weeks.

Cheers

Chris in VA

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Chris,

For smaller projects I use 3/16 cold rolled round. If you are planing on a large project i would go with 1/4 inch round. Most of my projects are like 5 ft. x 4ft. or smaller with 3/16 inch material.

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You might try a local machine shop or metal fabricator shop. They may have extra stock that they will sell. It might cost a little more but it could be handy and they would likely cut it for you. I've worked both hot rolled and cold rolled. For the difference in cost and ease of bending, I prefer the hot rolled.

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