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Will Richards

Leaping Arches?????

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I saw a site one time that told you how lobg to make your pipes and then it told you how high they would be. for example they said a 10' piece of pipe with the ends 6' apart would make a 40" high arch. does anyone know of a site that tels you this?

Thanks

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If you wait around long enough, Jeff Ostruff will give you a link to his site.

In the meantime, you should know that they are just 10' pieces of PVC. Sometimes two or more are joined together to make 20' or more arches.

The height is up to you.

I like lower arches. some people like them higher.

To adjust the height, just change the distance between the "feet".

Edit: Or someone else will do it for him. :P

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Most people break it up into 7 or 8 channels, so 700 or 800 lights.

I used 8 channels, 100 lights per channel for whites, and 120 lights per channel for blues, becuase blues come in 60 count strings, so I used 2 of them for better density.

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Hey Jeff awesome setup and thanks for taking the time to do instructions as it will keep us on the straight and narrow path..hehe.

I'm lookin at adding 64 channels for a 20 foot megatree for next year and it will be my first attempt. Reading as much as I can so I don't makea costly mistake. After reading your instructions I might scale back to 48 channels, just not sure how I'm doing the strands yet. Reguardless of what I come up with your instructions have given me some ideas I didn't think about (like running the light string up and back down again)...

Also noticed your website has a few YouTube video links that don't work anymore so thought I'd let you know.

Thanks again for taking the time to pass along your knowledge :smile:

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Wow 64 channels.... I am use 32 channels, 16 per color with 9600 total lights and 4800 per color. I have 3 slices per channel staying with the 3 plug rule. It is also 20' mega tree. I am using 4" spacing on a 15' dia base.

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now this will sound weird, but apparently they are all working.

Earlier YouTube said the video was no longer available. Maybe they were doing server upgrades or something.

They all work now, thanks!

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gholt you may have run into what many of us run into on occasion on youtube, sometimes the clip just does not play, or it runs a few seconds and freezes, then rund again. We get what we pay for!

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jeffostroff wrote:

For my medium sized arches, I used 2 pipes 7 1/2 feet long, coupled together with an inline screw in coupler.

Hi Jeff,

Before I start, I'd like to say I really appreciate your instructional "How To's" as well. They get the creative juices flowing. I have a question though. You mention in your PPT and in this post to use a male and a female coupler. Why is that over a standard (pipe to pipe) coupler (e.g. split them in two for storage purposes)? The reason I ask is, both the male / female coupler's have the same pipe depth as the straight coupler. Neither seemed deep enough considering the angle forces placed on the couplers when you arc them.

What I decided to do instead after watching the pipe's buckle a littleat the coupler pointupon arcing them, was tobuy a T-joint coupler. The reasonis, after a little modification (e.g.using my dremel tool to remove the center pipe exit and sanding downthe internal pipe stop lips), the pipe depth is nearly double that of the standard couplers. With both pipes going deeper into the coupler, there's no buckle issue at the arch apex (granted, I'll have to store 15-foot arches)...

J.D.

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JD:

I recommend the threaded couplers because they are not going to separate from the forces on the arch. You already have them glued onto each PVC pipe, so now when you join them, they thread together. It's one less cemented joint to possibly come apart. I also recommend gluing in a 6" nipplepipe ontp one of the PVS sections, and let it hang out 3" soit will reach actorss to the other PVC pipe. This will give a good strong support to the arch apex.

Don't worry about any bumps that the couplers cause to the pipe profile, they are fairly low profile, and when you wrap the lights around the couplers and the pipe, you won't notice anything at all about the shape of the pipe where the couplers are.

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WOW! Nice arches. The way they are spread out I can see you needed quite a few controllers as it looks like you have 4 to 6 arches before you repeat! Great stuff! Any chance of posting the controller wiring diagram if I'm off?

Also those little tower things look cool--haven't seen them before. I got a lot of work for next year...hehe

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jeffostroff wrote:

JD:

I also recommend gluing in a 6" nipplepipe onto one of the PVS sections, and let it hang out 3" soit will reach actorss to the other PVC pipe. This will give a good strong support to the arch apex.

Hi Jeff,

I don't understand what you mean by a six-inch nipple pipe. Can you explain or post a picture to clarify this? Thanks...

J.D.

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I enclosed a shot of one here. I don't know why they call them that, but that's what they call them. It's a short pipe. You get them in the plumbing aisle at Lowes or Home Desperate.

The one you want to use is 6", and make sure it's no wider than 3/8" or it will not fit in your PVC pipe. I would buy it when you buy your PVC pipe, so you know it will fit inside the pipe. Then I just use thick gooey silicon glue to cement it into place halfway into one PVC pipe. Then it sticks out of the end of the PVC pipe by about 3". and once dry, slide the other PVC pipe over the this and tighten the couplers togethers. This will sort of act as a wedge inside the top of your arch, keeping the top of the arch from sagging, and preventing the 2 sections from coming apart.

post-2688-129571020318_thumb.jpg

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Not really what I was looking for, I was looking for the programming examples for a sequence such as this one.

here are Richard Holdmans sequence files for his songs with leaping arches in them.

http://www.holdman.com/christmas/sequences/

For Videos of the sequences, go to his website http://www.holdman.com/christmas/video.asp

I was thinking there was a post here somewhere that had screen shots of the sequences wit the arches, but couldn't find it....this should help though.

Edited by ChrisL1976

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