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Kevin Provost

Re: Painting

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Ted,

You're absolutely right, a 50% off coupon at Michael's would be just as good as the prices I can get and would be much easier.

My plan had been to suggest anyone interested go to Badger's website to find the products they're interested in, then contact me for a price. Airbrushes over $25 I'd be able to have drop shipped to you. So if there's something Michael's doesn't carry you're interested in, give me a PM and I'll see if I can help.

-Steve

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:tree:

Hi All,

This is a great topic, which I believe I'm ready to act upon.

Forgive me for being a little late, but the other refurbishing post mentioned, is that the one in the PlanetChristmas How To section? That one includes stripping instructions as well. Did the apparent controversy surround painting methods?

Anyway, I will be using whatever information I can dig up as I may be refinishing my Pilgrams and Indian set. I don't know what kind of paint is on there now, but it has a kind of chalky feel to it. It's starting to chip so it may be time to strip and repaint.

Thanks for all the good info!

:tree:

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Superfreak3 wrote:

Forgive me for being a little late, but the other refurbishing post mentioned, is that the one in the PlanetChristmas How To section? That one includes stripping instructions as well. Did the apparent controversy surround painting methods?

Anyway, I will be using whatever information I can dig up as I may be refinishing my Pilgrams and Indian set. I don't know what kind of paint is on there now, but it has a kind of chalky feel to it. It's starting to chip so it may be time to strip and repaint.

Glad you made it. ;) There is new information in 2 areas which are stripping and painting. As for stripping there is a product called 3M Easy Stripper which will not harm the plastic. This is much better than the old method which is still shown in the P.C. how-to. You just brush it on andlet it sit for a minute. Then you can wipe off the excess with paper towels or rags. You will need to wash the blowmold pretty good with soap and water. Dish soap will do fine. Some folks like to mix a little amonia with it but I don't think that's absolutely necessary.

As for painting Kev has brought us some new information on using an air brush. The information is in the first post in this thread. The "old" method was using Krylon Fusion paint for plastic (or testor's model paint in the little spray cans). This is the method in the how-to. I think this is still a viable method for those who don't want to get into the air brush technique.Many of the 'molders have had excellent results with it, but I think many of us are excited about the new possibility of air brushing!

TED

P.S. There is really no controversy--just a little misunderstanding that we have put behind us!

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Ok all i gotta say now about painting blowmolds as when people try to paint them with a brush and cake it on OMG trying to stripp that off is a total NIGHTMARE lol ive been strippin the same snowman for 2 nights now and still havent got it all off. Any suggestions??????

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I finnaly got it i used the 3m easy stripper lol and about 4 outhers but i finnaly got ill post a pic later of the finished product he looks pretty good i just got a little bit left .

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DanglinModifiers wrote:

You're absolutely right, a 50% off coupon at Michael's would be just as good as the prices I can get and would be much easier.

My plan had been to suggest anyone interested go to Badger's website to find the products they're interested in, then contact me for a price. Airbrushes over $25 I'd be able to have drop shipped to you. So if there's something Michael's doesn't carry you're interested in, give me a PM and I'll see if I can help.

I had a chance to drop by Michael's.Here's what I found.

Air Brushes and sets:

Badger Anthem ModelNo. 155-7 $139.99

Badger Crescendo set with 3 heads $139.99

Badger Model 350-6 Airbrush craft set $99.99

Badger(?) Wood box model 150-5 $159.99

Badger Anthem model 155-1 $129.99

Badger(?) Standard set 350 medium head with Propellant $59.99

Badger(?) Basic Spray Gun 250 $27.99

Compressors:

Badger Whirlwind 180-10 $179.99

Badger Cyclone 180-12 $249.99

Aerosol cans:

9 oz. Propellant $9.99

14 oz. Propellant $12.99

I've figured out a couple things about air brushes in general thatmay behelpful in comparing different types. First (and fairly obvious)there are internal mix and external mix. With an internal mix gun the mixing ofair and painttakes place inside the paint jar. With an external mix gunthe mixing of air and painttakes place outside (and after) the paint jar. There are also single action and dual action guns. Single action means that there is only one control that regulates both air and paint. Dual action means that there are 2 controls so that the flow of paint and air can be controlled independently.

My thoughts in general about buying an air brush are that an "expensive" model is not necessary for repainting blowmolds. If you are going to tape off the area to be painted (necessary in most cases unless you are really really good at this) then you don't need the high level of precision that you would need in other applications. For example if you are doing precision artwork such as painting pictures (or even T-shirts) then there's no taping off involved.You would need a high level of precision for everything from finelines to blending large areas of colormuch like if you weredoingan oil painting with apaint brush. Even if you can do a very fine line you would have to have a VERY steady hand to paint a blowmold without doing any taping. (I am thinking about trying an automotive touch up gun with the Creatine paints since I already have one.)

Oh, I almost forgot--speaking of Creatine paints the 2 oz. bottles are $3.49 at Michael's. Ibelieve they were the same price at Hobby Lobby. There are kits that have several different colors of paint. Those were cheaper at Hobby Lobby.

TED

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Thanks for the information Ted, these prices are definitely out of my range at the moment so I believe I will have to browse around a bit. I would prefer to do the group buy, but I don't know what the status of that is at the moment.

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TED wrote:

I had a chance to drop by Michael's.Here's what I found.

Ted, thanks for putting together that list, I'll add the prices I can offer:

Air Brushes and sets:

Badger Anthem ModelNo. 155-7 $139.99 - $69

Badger Crescendo set with 3 heads $139.99 - $72.50

Badger Model 350-6 Airbrush craft set $99.99 - $50.50

Badger(?) Wood box model 150-5 $159.99 - $78.50

Badger Anthem model 155-1 $129.99 - $62.00

Badger(?) Standard set 350 medium head with Propellant $59.99 - $28.00

Badger(?) Basic Spray Gun 250 $27.99 - $13.50*

Compressors:

Badger Whirlwind 180-10 $179.99 - $77.20

Badger Cyclone 180-12 $249.99 - $107.20

Aerosol cans:

9 oz. Propellant $9.99 - N/A

14 oz. Propellant $12.99 - 13oz - $4.86*

19 oz. Propellant - $6.96*

All prices are before shipping. Anything with a * I can only get in a case of 12, so I'd need to wait for 12 orders. Everything else I can have drop shipped to you, but for the case packs, you'd wind up paying for shipping twice.

The prices are all pretty close to Michael's price with a 50% off coupon. A few are a couple dollars cheaper, others are a bit more. By the time you add shipping to my prices, I'm sure they'd all be higher.

I was hoping I'd be able to save you guys a good bit of money, but that doesn't look like the case. Aside from the * items, I am able to order anything on a per item basis, so if you're still interested let me know. There's no need for a group buy on those.

Let me know if you need more information on anything!

-Steve

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DanglinModifiers wrote:

The prices are all pretty close to Michael's price with a 50% off coupon. A few are a couple dollars cheaper, others are a bit more. By the time you add shipping to my prices, I'm sure they'd all be higher.

I was hoping I'd be able to save you guys a good bit of money, but that doesn't look like the case.

Thanks for posting those. The prices you can getare pretty good. The weekly coupon at Michael's is usually 40% off. The 50% off couponsare only available occasionally for special sales around holidays and stuff. You are right about the shipping though. It could make it a toss up.

One thing I was thinking about is that both Michael's and Hobby Lobby only have the 2 oz. bottles of the paint. Do you have access to the larger sizes? What are those prices like? (I'm guessing there are minimum quantities?) Is drop shipping a possibility on paint? Thanks!

TED

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Kev

For the mold I am restoring I need white and black and I don't see these on the createx site in transparent. What would you recomend I use?

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Kev

For the mold I am restoring I need white and black and I don't see these on the createx site in transparent. What would you recomend I use?

You won't find white in transparent because it would literally be invisible. You shouldn't need white however, since the plastic is white. White on any light-up is just the unpainted plastic.

Here is the black paint:

http://www.hyatts.com/art/createx-4oz-pro-black-J22321

Is that black actually transparent? It doesn't say at the link. I'm not sure it would matter. I don't think black is going to let any light come through. (A delima when trying to make a black sheep!) I know the transparent assortment packs come opaque white and opaque black.

TED

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Kev, wow! I don't participate much in the blow mold forums, I only watch them, mostly because I only started getting some in the past few years. After you think about it, airbrushing makes a lot of sense in this application, and now that you have identified paint that makes sense to use, I am tossing this thread into my notebook. With some of the pieces I picked up, this looks to be a great way to polish them up. I already have the compressor set up.

You said you taped off very little. How did you do the NOEL on the candle?

You mentioned heating up the blowmold. So the plastic needs to be warm, or the environment?

Last question. You mentioned to paint right over the old paint, what if it is flaking. Should you hit it at all with some fine mesh steel wool first?

Thanks for the great post!

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Mark, I'm not Kev, but I've redone a lot of blow molds..if you use fine steel wool be extremely careful with it, it tends to not only take the paint off but it also scratches the underlying plastic (I've tried it..trust me). If the paint is flaking, its better to use a softer plastic scrub brush on it. If the paint is flaking badly, strip the paint first. If you paint over the old paint onto the newly cleaned white plastic, you will get a darker edge where the paint overlaps. Using an airbrush, you'd be able to control this better than if you used spray paint, but if you strip the mold first, you will have even coverage throughout allowing the light to shine through properly.

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I hate stripping molds w/ caked on paint. I have used Lacquer in the past. Works pretty good, but you need to be careful and wash off so as not to damage the plastic.

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Is that black actually transparent? It doesn't say at the link. I'm not sure it would matter. I don't think black is going to let any light come through. (A delima when trying to make a black sheep!) I know the transparent assortment packs come opaque white and opaque black.

TED

The black is opaque, Createx has apparently discontinued the transparent black Tinting Black and also another transparent black which was manufactured under their now defunct Nail Ease line of paints. They did in fact allow a bit of light through. I still have an old bottle of the Nail Ease that is almost empty, the issue with the opaque paints is they do not dry to a gloss. Until I can purchase some of the opaque black, I suggest getting a gloss medium to mix in with the paint or spray over the opaque. Check here to see all of the current colors that are available- http://www.createxcolors.com/home_page.htm

I have verified another replacement color, the transparent Caribbean Blue is the correct replacement for the Empire blue that is found on the derby hat snowman's jacket, Tiny Tim, etc. and also was used for blue eyes.

The plastic should be heated so it is slightly hot to the touch, a pre-heating works very well, the paint bonds instantly. I pre-heat the plastic, spray a light coat on, heat again, then apply the final coat and heat one final time. Give the paint a good amount of time to dry, it will remain tacky for quite awhile, this is normal. I began painting without heating, but this is not recommended as I found out by reading the prep for plastic. The heating is definitely a plus.

Mark,

That is excellent to hear! Do post images when you are done.

Carrie is quite correct, steel wool and sandpaper will easily damage the plastic. A soft brush should certainly be used. If you have flaking, strip all of the paint off completely. If you attempt to fill in the areas that have flaked it will be clearly visible when lit. The old paint will also continue to flake under the new, removing it. If you only have fading, apply the paint directly over the old.

The Noel lettering on the candle is the original paint, the candles I purchased new at Caldor and they haven't been displayed for quite a few years, so they did not need a new paint job. I only painted the poinsettia blossoms on the stem and the holly around the base.

Overspray with the model 250 spray gun is about two inches or so, I have found it depends on the paint too, some paints have less overspray for whatever reason. I had no overspray with the Caribbean Blue. If you can afford to, get a slightly better model that allows a very fine spray. The 250 works, but requires some skill and or more time/effort to prep for.

Janice,

Createx makes a gold paint, Pearl Satin Gold. I have not tried this color yet however. I have viewed it at the store and it appears to be very good.

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The plastic should be heated so it is slightly hot to the touch, a pre-heating works very well, the paint bonds instantly. I pre-heat the plastic, spray a light coat on, heat again, then apply the final coat and heat one final time.

I seem to remember that you first recommended heating the plastic but then came back in a later post recommended against it. I believe the reason was that the paint forumulation had been changed (updated) so that heating was no longer necessary.

Ok, I went back and found it:

I tested out painting unheated plastic, the paint dries to a hard finish much faster then with the heating.

I wanted to share this and recommend everyone abandon the heating preparation.

This was with the new reformulated Createx paint which clearly doesn't need the heat.

TED

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Yes, hence why I corrected myself. "I began painting without heating, but this is not recommended as I found out by reading the prep for plastic. The heating is definitely a plus." It did appear the heating was unnecessary, which it still does. I made the decision to return to the heating because of the prep instructions listed by the manufacturer. I thought perhaps it would be a good idea to see what it said before I continued with not heating. I am sure it will make for longer lasting paint. I am learning as I go, so the best I can do is make corrections as they arise.

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Yes, hence why I corrected myself. "I began painting without heating, but this is not recommended as I found out by reading the prep for plastic. The heating is definitely a plus." It did appear the heating was unnecessary, which it still does. I made the decision to return to the heating because of the prep instructions listed by the manufacturer. I thought perhaps it would be a good idea to see what it said before I continued with not heating. I am sure it will make for longer lasting paint. I am learning as I go, so the best I can do is make corrections as they arise.

Ok, I was confused there for a minute! So if I'm following this correctly, you have updated the previous correction and the current thinking is that heating while not strictly "necessary" is a good thing (again) and should make the paint last longer?

TED

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the issue with the opaque paints is they do not dry to a gloss. Until I can purchase some of the opaque black, I suggest getting a gloss medium to mix in with the paint or spray over the opaque.

Another fix for this would be to shoot a clear coat over the flat color. That should give it a nice gloss.

I have verified another replacement color, the transparent Caribbean Blue is the correct replacement for the Empire blue that is found on the derby hat snowman's jacket, Tiny Tim, etc. and also was used for blue eyes.

We need to make up a master list of these somewhere!

TED

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Hi everyone.

I'm seriously thinking about repainting some of my blowmolds. I'm gonna use an airbrush and the transparent paints mentioned on here. Does anyone know which colors best respond to the original colors on the giant sized poloron nativity? And how do I make sure that my repainting wont make the figures too dark?

Thanks!

Jon

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