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Jason Rose

FInished! SSR addition to a "lights and sounds" controler

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Hi everyone I am brand new to the holiday light scene, and I am interested in doing this mod to my Gemmy Hoilday Lightshow. I understand the reason for the ssr's but the way it is wired is what i'm not understanding. Does anyone have wiring schematics on this?

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The bottom 2 connections (screws) on the SSR are connected to the Device that's doing the switching on and off, in this case the Gemmy. I just made short cords with standard plugs on the ends, these plug into each plug on the unit.

The top left screw, on each SSR is the power INPUT. This is where you connect your power source. On the box I built I used 3 seperate power cords, and connected one "hot" (black) lead to 2 SSRs, using a small jumper wire between the two. The more power cords you use the more amps you can potentially run. If you don't plan to run more than 15 to 18 amps at the most, then one power cord could be connected to all the SSRs, just connect them daisy chain style. Or you can use 2, whatever works for you.

The Top right screw is the actual "switched power" This connects ultimately to your lights you are controlling. Mine are connected to the hot (black) lead of 6 outlet power strips. I can tell you now that the power strips are really unnecessary. A better option is just use a standard cord end, or use the household type lamp cords with the tri-tap on the end. Use the male end for connecting to the gemmy and the female end for the lights. They are rated for 8 amps I believe, which is all you should be running (max) per channel on these SSRs anyway.

The rest of the wires, the Whites (common) from the power source and then out to the output lines are simply all connected. Same with the ground wires. The grounds aren't really necessary though, as lights do NOT use grounding. If you are using a metal box to hold the SSRs, connect the ground to that.

Hope this helps...

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Hmmm I didn't know you could get pre-made 120v AC SSR's :eek: I've only seen the

low-voltage DC ones.

I've always built my own SSR's for this purpose :)

When i built my computer control boards years ago I never thought i'd need more than

a couple amps per channel so I used 4A Triacs in them (thus allowing 2A per channel

load)... I also used to use some stand-alone 'Color-Organ' type flashers in the display

(those were pre-built things and also had a 2A limit)

As i got more lights it turns out the 2A limit was not NEAR enough power LOL! so my

solution was to get the parts and just build my own SSR's (fairly simple to do, its just a

Triac, Opto-Isolator, Diode Bridge, some Resistors & of course Heatsink). Now i've built

multiple which can handle 12A each.

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Newb here, got the gemmy 12ch, last year after xmas for a deal, had a very very intresting year,setting up my gemmy and gonna do the ssr mod at least for 6 channels,got a real deal for the ssr's, 12 new p&b ssr's for $65 shipped :), new I should have bought those power strips on black friday :(

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Well thanks to a little advice on here about using SSR's (Solid State Relays) and finding a dozen of them, basically brand new for cheap, I now have a GE Lights and Sounds of Christmas controler that is capable of controling ~45 Amps!

Plastic junction box from Home Depot, 8x8x4"

Used a peice of ceder 6" wide board screwed to the back of the box to mount the SSR's.

14 gauge grounded wire, 2 SSR's per cord, gives the possibility to use power from 3 different sources depending on the load going thru the relays. Relays are rated for 10 amps each. Hopefully running 1/2 to 2/3 that at the most I won't have much heat issues.

Used 1- 6 outlet power strip per "channel", mounted a bit crudely to a 4x4. I plan to drill a hole in the bottom to accept a peice of rebar to stick into the ground, then cover the power strips with a box or a 5 gallon bucket to keep dry.

Tested and it works PERFECT! Now All I need is to crack the LASOC open and add the jack for the FM transmitter, and do the Belkin transmitter mod. Baby steps...

Anyone wants any more info, let me know! I know it's not a perfect looking job, but it's not too bad either.

SSRforLASOC003.jpg

SSRforLASOC001.jpg

This looks great! I too have zero electrical engineering experience. I am a computer support guru but take me out of my comfort zone and I'm completely lost.

I have the GE Lights and Sounds of Christmas that I picked up for $49.99 at BJ's this year when everyone else (HD, Lowes) was selling them for $89.99. I am getting things setup and I am quickly outgrowing it capacity already. It is becoming a magical feat to figure out how to stay under 2 amps on each outlet and make and entire yard display work on 6 channels.

Learning about SSR's is a good starting point. I would like to try and find a 'Dummies guide to building SSR controllers' for us electrical inept individuals! If anyone knows of one out there please share!

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Does anyone have a simple layout of how the relays are wired for this? I would like to build one so I can add more lights to my display. I know I'll have a heat problem here in DFW, Tx so I picked up a aluminum heat sink (10"x7"x1 3/4") that I'll mount the SSR's to. Any advice on setting this up would be welcomed.

~jesse

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Jesse, all so very simple.

-------0-------- is the coil like a old relay. Just take the two wires from the controller and wire to ether screw on the ends by this symbol.

-------l l------- is the contacts or switched side. On say the left screw put the hot lead (Black) from the supply cord. On the other side put the black lead going to a socket. Now from the supply lead cable that is going to the left side, take the white wire and using a wire nut attach this white lead to the white wire that is in the cord that is attached to the socket.. Was going to try to do some old fashioned ascii graphics. But remembered that these forums remove a lot of blank spaces.

Edited by Max-Paul

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That doesn't sound too hard to setup. Always like to verify when playing with electricity.

Has anyone here used a heat sink with this configuration? Would like to see how they set it up. Here is a quick picture of the heat sink I'll be using.

~jesse

[ATTACH=CONFIG]36628[/ATTACH]

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Hmmm I didn't know you could get pre-made 120v AC SSR's :eek: I've only seen the

low-voltage DC ones.

While not as common, they are available. With LOR I find these most useful, and actually can use some more at this point in time!

As a workaround for a DC triggered SSR, you could power trigger it with a small DC wallwort....

Greg

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