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pbryan

CDI M5 Red LEDs and LOR

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I checked the CDI 2008 C6 LEDs, and the replaceable bulbs must be put in one way or they will be damaged electrically. They are polarity dependent. There is a flat side on the socket and a flat side on the bulb lens that must mate together. I had to use a magnifying glass to see it. I don't know if this is true for the other types of Innovalite-type bulbs.

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Can you try one more test please?

Put a 33K 2 watt resistor or a 47K 1 watt resistor across the AC output channel power to each of the light strings.

Each channel needs a resistor and see if the cross talk goes away.

Dennis, I tried this without any luck. I also found out that the 2008 CDI strings do not have polarised female sockets so my CDI male vampire plugs do not fit. I also tried ferrite core chokes without any luck.

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So has the fix on the C7 25 counts been working after testing for a few days? I was short 2 strings, so adjusted my display to make up for it, but then another string crapped out when I plugged them in after getting them hung.

I think I'll have to install the fixes on my greens....my reds seem to be fine, although it would be nice to be able to fade them! :-)

So let me know what works, what parts I need, and where to get them. And remember, I am so not an electrician! :-P

Thanks all!

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Dennis, I tried this without any luck. I also found out that the 2008 CDI strings do not have polarised female sockets so my CDI male vampire plugs do not fit. I also tried ferrite core chokes without any luck.

You should be able to get the vampire plugs in but takes some back and forth motion to work.

I am using SPT2 plugs into non polarized light strings and have to convince it to plug in, once it starts it gets easier.

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So has the fix on the C7 25 counts been working after testing for a few days? I was short 2 strings, so adjusted my display to make up for it, but then another string crapped out when I plugged them in after getting them hung.

I think I'll have to install the fixes on my greens....my reds seem to be fine, although it would be nice to be able to fade them! :-)

So let me know what works, what parts I need, and where to get them. And remember, I am so not an electrician! :-P

Thanks all!

I've been testing my show for about a week and my fix has been rock solid. I opted for the full bridge rectifier replacement, while passing through AC to the female plug.

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Anyone know what size resistor I would need to do the in series fix on red and green C7's from CDI? I know that Michael and Tim used the 3.3k 1/2 watt for their m5 strings....and I know you guys that are doing the the multiple resistor / rectifier full fix are using (2) 2.7k 2 watt resistors and (4) 600V 1A rectifiers.

So for Green would the 2.7k 2 watt resistor work for the single in series fix work? And Red would be the 2.7k 3 watt resistor???

Thanks!

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Tyson i to have the c7's 50 count from cdi and they are getting more dim each day can you post a picture of what you are trying to do so i can see and may be try it thank you Blair

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These resistors only go on the male end 1 each-

Thick Film Resistors 3WATT 2.7KOHM 5% for red #66-GS31002701JLF

Metal Oxide Resistors 2W 2.4K 5% for blue and green #660-MOS2CT52R242J

Rectifiers - Standard Vr/600V Io/1A T/R #821-1N4005

These were from Mouser.com. I used duct tape on top of the electrical tape for extra insulation for red as that resistor gets pretty warm. I used RaynMesa's diagrams on page 17 of this thread to build them. Notice the stripe on the diodes correspond to the line on his drawings. They are reversed on the female end compared to the male end.

These give the original brightness and are working for me.

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Tyson i to have the c7's 50 count from cdi and they are getting more dim each day can you post a picture of what you are trying to do so i can see and may be try it thank you Blair

I only had 1 string of 50 ct so I just cut it in half to make 2 25 ct strings. The resean I only had 1 was it was a string he sent me to test months ago to see if I liked them better than a competing brand and I bought it because The c7's can be seen brightly from all angles as long as you point the tip toward the front of the house. The competitors brand was more picky and would dim greatly if you moved away from the right angle.

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I only had 1 string of 50 ct so I just cut it in half to make 2 25 ct strings. The resean I only had 1 was it was a string he sent me to test months ago to see if I liked them better than a competing brand and I bought it because The c7's can be seen brightly from all angles as long as you point the tip toward the front of the house. The competitors brand was more picky and would dim greatly if you moved away from the right angle.

I totally agree with you Keith, that's why I went with the C7's. They seemed to be the perfect balance of brightness / surface area and size. Plus I like the 8" spacing. Thanks for the comments!

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Wow, this is really bad. I went through all but my warm white M5's and only found 3 bad sets (spent about $3k in lights, at about $300 in shipping). I decided I way over did it for this year, and ran out of time, but I got one of my LOR controllers running, and hooked up 16 of my known good M5 Red 35 count strands. After running the controller in test mode, and doing a few different things, the battery backup on my computer tripped.

Then I started noticing that about half of the strands were about 50% dim, and some are flickering, as a brief glance at the 32 pages in this thread seems to elude to.

Now I finally understand the full extent of the return authorization letter I got back in November, which IMO, was not very clear in the first place.

So now, I either go through all the lights AGAIN, and verify operation with a controller, or just send everything back, at my cost?

I'm very disappointed in the quality of this product, especially, after hearing all the rave reviews from last year. I know if Paul covered shipping both ways, it would be expensive, but I deal with China suppliers with my job, and checks should have been made before these LED lights were shipped to customers. That should include various controller testing, if these are touted as being compatible with controllers...

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Well, I spoke with Paul, and he is going to take care of it, granted, I have to send everything back (which I found out is much cheaper than the original shipping, if you can package them in boxes up to 70lbs with UPS), but I'm just glad things will be better next year, hopefully.

I have a static display this year, after ruining about 15 strands of lights, but the wife just went out side, and said, well, it still looks good, and it's better than nothing, so that is what counts!

Thanks for taking care of your customers Paul. I hope you end up with a better year next year, and I'm sure you never intended for this to happen.

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Well, I spoke with Paul, and he is going to take care of it, granted, I have to send everything back (which I found out is much cheaper than the original shipping, if you can package them in boxes up to 70lbs with UPS), but I'm just glad things will be better next year, hopefully.

\QUOTE]

Are you saying that Paul is going to pay for your shipping?

With the purchase price of these lights, and the cost of having them shipped to us, and the cost of having to ship them back, these are going to be some very expensive lights:eek:

I think the manufacturer should pay for our return shipping:D

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No, he is not. I was just pointing out that if you ship them in as few if boxes as you can, weighing less than 70lbs, that it is a lot cheaper than sending a lot of 25lb boxes.

Although, seeing as how these could be fire hazards from some of the posts, maybe they should be recalled. I've had some units fail just by plugging them in.

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I only bought C-6 70 ct blue LED's this year

I think 36 strings all together

I have about a dozen sets running, one has failed already

I only have them on bushes - after the smoke & fire posts I won't risk the house

They are the replaceable bulbs - since spares were included

So I guess these go back

Bummer

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I have only had a bit of a read of this thread since its so long. But I will add that to me, and the guy I know who does power supply repaid for a job the idea of saying that its ok to use phase control to dim something with a voltage doubler in it is totally insane. Whoever said these lights could be dimmed has no clue IMO.

The transient from turnon of the triac/scr is a step function virtually. When at the peak of the AC that is going to have almost no impedance from the series cap which would normally be providing quite a deal of voltage drop when operating off a sine wave as is expected.

I am surprised that people have not seen that design with a capacitor as a dropping element causing the channels of their controllers to have the triacs destroyed - I guess its a testomonial to the overengeneering that they have put into it.

The modification with a rectifier is better, but there is no way you will get dimming if a smoothing cap is added, particually on the red leds which have a sharper knee to their V/I curve then the blue and white ones do. Its the only sane way to even try to get some control over a fixed current device by chopping up the AC supply. Even then you will have the problem with a very narrow range of control which may mean you have to run the dimmers between say 30% and 50% to get the whole range of brightnes available.

IMO the person in china at the factory had to have known that these would fail when dimmed - or they have no clue and are just copying a design off another manufacturer without any idea of basic electronics. That happens all the time over there. If dealing with Chinese suppliers they will say yes to anything to close a sale even if they have no idea.

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I have only had a bit of a read of this thread since its so long. But I will add that to me, and the guy I know who does power supply repaid for a job the idea of saying that its ok to use phase control to dim something with a voltage doubler in it is totally insane. Whoever said these lights could be dimmed has no clue IMO.

You should have read a bit more, especially since there are quite a few threads on this topic. Regardless of what you or your friend who repaid (repairs?) power supplies says, those strings can be dimmed. I've seen it with my own eyes.

The transient from turnon of the triac/scr is a step function virtually. When at the peak of the AC that is going to have almost no impedance from the series cap which would normally be providing quite a deal of voltage drop when operating off a sine wave as is expected.

I am surprised that people have not seen that design with a capacitor as a dropping element causing the channels of their controllers to have the triacs destroyed - I guess its a testomonial to the overengeneering that they have put into it.

The circuit does not use the caps as dropping elements. It uses the caps as storage or smoothing elements.

The modification with a rectifier is better, but there is no way you will get dimming if a smoothing cap is added, particually on the red leds which have a sharper knee to their V/I curve then the blue and white ones do. Its the only sane way to even try to get some control over a fixed current device by chopping up the AC supply. Even then you will have the problem with a very narrow range of control which may mean you have to run the dimmers between say 30% and 50% to get the whole range of brightnes available.

Sorry, they do dim. Some of the components appear to be improperly rated, but that is a flaw that can be easily corrected (as they have).

IMO the person in china at the factory had to have known that these would fail when dimmed - or they have no clue and are just copying a design off another manufacturer without any idea of basic electronics. That happens all the time over there. If dealing with Chinese suppliers they will say yes to anything to close a sale even if they have no idea.

The problems here doesn't have anything to do with 'over there'. It happens just as often 'over here', and has more to do with the nature of sales people than with nationality or ethnicity.

Have a nice day.

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The problems here doesn't have anything to do with 'over there'. It happens just as often 'over here', and has more to do with the nature of sales people than with nationality or ethnicity.

I can't speak to the relative frequencies, but I have a good friend that's an engineer at a major industrial products manufacturer here in town. He tells me that whenever they spec out a job in China, they have to constantly be on the watch for the factory switching out components to save a few cents. They regularly send people to the factories to make sure things are following the prescribed specs...

-Tim

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You should have read a bit more, especially since there are quite a few threads on this topic. Regardless of what you or your friend who repaid (repairs?) power supplies says, those strings can be dimmed. I've seen it with my own eyes.

They can be dimmed, but the peak currents and resulting stress on the components will exceed what they are designed for.

The circuit does not use the caps as dropping elements. It uses the caps as storage or smoothing elements.

The capacitor in series as part of the voltage doubler is also a limiting device. Putting a step into that is just asking for it to fail since there is no current limiting to limit the inrush other then the resistor on the other leg of the input side of it.

Sorry, they do dim. Some of the components appear to be improperly rated, but that is a flaw that can be easily corrected (as they have).

Yes, they get dimmer, but to do it properly needs either current or PWM control. Phase control into a non smoothed power supply gives a good approximation of it, but without a regulated current then there will be considerable shifts in brightness with small changes in line voltage .

What they have there is trying to limit the charge into the capacitor with the delayed turn on. It will also suffer a small range of control but should give a wider range then a rectification only driven set and hopefully less flicker as well. Without knowing how much of the limiting is done by R1 in the PDF schematic and how much by R2 its impossible to estimate the inrush current, but whatever it is will need a good capacitor if its to survive on a chopped waveform.

Has anyone even looked into how much EMF these radiate when running?

The problems here doesn't have anything to do with 'over there'. It happens just as often 'over here', and has more to do with the nature of sales people than with nationality or ethnicity.

Have a nice day.

Mis-specced componentry with a promise that the goods are suitable for something they clearly are not is common. Order a pallet full of weatherproof CCD cameras and end up with one of CMOS that are barely able to get damp without leaking, order 400 AC adapters that claim to meet the needed australian standard for them to be sold legally and get ones that dont even have the right pins on the plugs.

Even when the samples are ok, my friend has had loads or cheap electronics where halfway down the pallet the design just changes to something well inferior. This is multiple suppliers. Eventually he found one that is good, but they are more expensive.

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