Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
wakebums

100 watt floods

Recommended Posts

Im thinking of using some 100 watt flood lights on my show this year.. The only question I have is, How much power does a 100 watt flood put out? I know I have 1.875 amps per channel on my LOR unit.. How much power is the 100 watt light going to use? And how many can I do per channel.. I have 3 extra channels to use.

Thanks: Gene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Wakebums,

This should help if you haven't found the answer yet

The conversion of Watts to Amps is governed by the equation Amps = Watts/Volts

For example 12 watts/12 volts = 1 amp

So 100 watts / 120 volts = 0.83

Looks like you can squeeze it in may 2 even but I would do 1 per channel, I'm not sure of the channel rating on the LOR units I do know

that you don't really want to go over 1800 watts a circuit which equals 15 amps and LOR has some Deluxe models to that do 20 amps a circuit so their are a few variables I'm not aware of with your situation like if your have dual power feeds and so forth.

Anyway I hope this helps a little for you

Ted

Edited by tallan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am studying and reading up on the animated display options, Hoping to start adding some to our display soon! I LOVE playing with schematics and getting to use my electrical background.

If you need to run 110/120 V spots, you could do this easily with a relay. your LOR would signal the relay to close the circuit, then your higher current demands would be pulled through it.

(it will be non-fading of course)

here are a couple links (also I found these posted in a few other forums- so members on here DO have working knowledge of the relays and their use)

Potter & Brumfield 120 VAC Relay, DPDT 15 Amp

Mouser Electronics- Part# 653-MY4-AC1

hope that helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im thinking of using some 100 watt flood lights on my show this year.. The only question I have is, How much power does a 100 watt flood put out? I know I have 1.875 amps per channel on my LOR unit.. How much power is the 100 watt light going to use? And how many can I do per channel.. I have 3 extra channels to use.

Thanks: Gene.

A 100 watt flood light bulb will draw approx 100 watts but only when turned on.

1.875 Amps X 120 Volts = 225 Watts so you can use 2.25 bulbs per Channel. Go to 75 watt bulbs and you can use 3

Edited by BMcGeeny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow.. Thanks.. Looks like I might have to find some LED flood lights...

Do a search here about CFL floods. They only draw 17W-23W, but put out 90W-100W.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do a search here about CFL floods. They only draw 17W-23W, but put out 90W-100W.

The only problem with CFL floods is they take several seconds to up to a minute to fully light. I have a CFL in one of my security lights. I have these set pointing into the display with motion detectors. If you walk inside the security area, it flips them on. The incandesant lights up right away, the CFL just glows dim for about 20 seconds. About the time the light goes back off if they detect no movement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only problem with CFL floods is they take several seconds to up to a minute to fully light. I have a CFL in one of my security lights. I have these set pointing into the display with motion detectors. If you walk inside the security area, it flips them on. The incandesant lights up right away, the CFL just glows dim for about 20 seconds. About the time the light goes back off if they detect no movement.

True. I was assuming the floods were for things like illuminating cutouts, not for a show element.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True. I was assuming the floods were for things like illuminating cutouts, not for a show element.

I am assuming since he wants to run them with LOR he will be cycling them on and off. Even if he only does every few minutes, the lag time would be unpredictable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 100 watt flood light bulb will draw approx 100 watts but only when turned on.

1.875 Amps X 120 Volts = 225 Watts so you can use 2.25 bulbs per Channel. Go to 75 watt bulbs and you can use 3

Hold on! Is that right? What happens if I run 4 100W floods from one channel? Cause that is what I have planned and am now in panic maode b/c I have no channels left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Randling -

If you keep in mind the LOR restrictions you'll be fine. They are max 8a per channel and 15a per side.

4x 100watt floods consume 3.33A (on paper, about 3.47A by my ammeter). I'm running 2 channels this year with 4x 100watt floods each and it works fine. I do have each channel on a seperate LOR controller, but that's more because I'm putting too much load on with everything else! :-)

I hooked up my ammeter and my draws with all lights on follow:

Unit 1 Side 1: 13.2a

Unit 1 Side 2: 12.8a

Unit 2 Side 1: 6.8a

Unit 2 Side 2: 10.0a

That includes 4 green floods and 4 red floods on 2 channels.

Cheers,

Jacob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am studying and reading up on the animated display options, Hoping to start adding some to our display soon! I LOVE playing with schematics and getting to use my electrical background.

If you need to run 110/120 V spots, you could do this easily with a relay. your LOR would signal the relay to close the circuit, then your higher current demands would be pulled through it.

(it will be non-fading of course)

here are a couple links (also I found these posted in a few other forums- so members on here DO have working knowledge of the relays and their use)

Potter & Brumfield 120 VAC Relay, DPDT 15 Amp

Mouser Electronics- Part# 653-MY4-AC1

hope that helps!

You do want to be careful using relays on LOR channels...

They (LOR) DO NOT recommend it due to the inductive load the coil presents to the triac during switching.

The other thing is making sure you don't accidentally add any fades or very short events that the electromechanical relay can't keep up with.

I know it HAS been done... just wanted to toss out the "rest of the story" ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well my LOR is running my 12 100 watt floods perfectly fine. I just split them down the middle and have 6 green on1 channel on 1 of the controllers, and the other 6 red floods on one channel on the other controller and not blown a fuse yet. Hoping to use led floods next year though.

Edited by Steven Singleton Jr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, so who knows good LED floods?

Yes I use these for my Halloween display, I use LED wall wash fixtures for Christmas. These floods I use out in the yard to highlight props and tombstones. They are very good LED Floods though with deep rich color and very bright. Also the price is amazing for these floods, you won't find them any cheaper.

Best thing about them is they have been tested and work with LOR, AL D-Light and others....

http://www.minionsweb.com/osStore/index.php?cPath=1_4_43_45

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to Corey (minionsweb) They fade perfectly as tested on dimming controllers from several vendors (including LOR). I have a few of R, G and W coming (plus an infrared for night-vision fun)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes as mentioned above they do fade with no ill effects or defects. All effects work with them and they work with AL, LOR, D-Light etc.

If you are going to get them, you need to get them now why they are in stock. He only gets them in batches and they go fast. last I checked they still have a few left. Each batch gets better and better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After all of the problems I've been having using the plastic "water/weather proof" flood stakes from Menards & Lowes I've decided to abandon them completely and go LED MR16 DC and build my own weatherproof capsules for the MR16 lights.

I've heard nothing but good things about them and if I start saving my pennies now, I'll have the money when it's time to buy next year.

Cheers!

Jacob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had a couple of LED PAR-38 lamps to have a play with from various vendors on ebay from hong-kong - most were quite unhappy to be dimmed because they just had a capacitor to limit current, and then a rectifier and a whole load of leds in series - the hard turn on from the dimmer being at half brightness appeared to make them burn out in no time.

On the one with an actual power supply in it, the dimming was very non-linear compared to an incandesent on the same dimmer, still far from ideal.

The idea that you can dim a light that is as complex as a LED on a proper power supply by chopping the supply waveform is a but too optimistic IMO, there are many DMX controlled ones that have a nice high frequency PWM dimming internal to them so there is no flicker like LEDs running on line frequency has.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I bought (4) CFL based floods at the walgreens 75% off (they had lots) ... and they use 23w each instead of 100w. I'm sure you can't fade them ... so I guess I better determine if the ramp up time is really 20 seconds ... because to be useful, they kind of need to come on in a few seconds or less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CFL is a useless technology for this sort of thing, the desire for less mercury in them gives us these stupid long warmup times because the amalgams used in them have a higher operating temperature then older style fatty tubes like used in office lights etc. Putting a coloured gel/filter on them to get the colours you want just reduces the efficancy, whereas the LED PAR-38 and PAR-30 lights are much more efficiant because they are only making the desired wavelenght light rather then makeing the lot and then blocking most of it.

If you are able to not dim them, they are great. Rapid flashing may cause problems depending on if the controller is smart enough to wait for a zero crossing for turnon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do a search here about CFL floods. They only draw 17W-23W, but put out 90W-100W.

I think they are asking about animating flood lights. I use 90 watt bulbs, as many as 2 per channel and 8 channels on a 15 amp Animated Lighting LC without problems. Go with halogen bulbs... anything less wont last with animation.

BTW, LOR and Animated Lighting units technically allow up to 8 to 10 amps to be used on a single channel provided that if they are loaded up this high, that you watch max load limits for the entire controller. Both LOR and AL use 20 amp triacs which means you can load a single channel up to 10 amps safely but it might be only 1 channel at a time can be operated. You also MUST use heat syncs on the triacs if you exceed 3 amps per channel. Animated Lightning has never sold a unit without heat syncs as far as I understand, LOR - it has been optional for years to be able to purchase LOR's with no heat syncs so some people opt to save the extra $10 to 20 and get with no heat sync.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Randling -

If you keep in mind the LOR restrictions you'll be fine. They are max 8a per channel and 15a per side.

4x 100watt floods consume 3.33A (on paper, about 3.47A by my ammeter). I'm running 2 channels this year with 4x 100watt floods each and it works fine. I do have each channel on a seperate LOR controller, but that's more because I'm putting too much load on with everything else! :-)

I hooked up my ammeter and my draws with all lights on follow:

Unit 1 Side 1: 13.2a

Unit 1 Side 2: 12.8a

Unit 2 Side 1: 6.8a

Unit 2 Side 2: 10.0a

That includes 4 green floods and 4 red floods on 2 channels.

Cheers,

Jacob

Now apply some dimming to the LOR and then see what the amp meter shows. I use 90 watt halogens but never jolt the units with over 85% brightness (giving about a 75/80 watt brightness and consumption). I have as many as 12 of these lights on at one time and comfortably operating 8 circuits of a 15 amp Animated Lighting LC... ropelights and other devices operating on the other 8 channels at same time and never got over 14 amps on that entire LC during the show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...