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Why use Coro instead of plywood?


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the latest project done by Steve Lelinski was truly amazing of his marching band.

I have a question though. Why do people use Coro instead of getting a large sheet of plywood, paint it white, and then drill holes for the mini lights to poke through?

I remember reading about Steve having some heating issues with his Coro and thinking that if you just used a sheet of plywood, it would be a lot more sturdy and would not get as much damaged caused by high winds.

I used a sheet of plywood for my Bethlehem Star with C9s and it turned out pretty good and was thinking of doing some projects with minis.

What are the advantages of using Coro instead of a sheet of plywood?

-Richard

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You do not have to have a drill to poke a hole in coro like you do with plywood.

Coro will not warp or peel with weathering or time like plywood, but Coro is not as durable as plywood either.

Coro is harder to find in sheets than plywood, though both are about the same price.

Painted Coro holds its color pretty good.

Coro is not as sturdy as plywood and has to use comprehensive design to keep it from flopping over.

Coro is easier to cut and does not require use of power tools.

Coro will hold a mini-light snuggly if you undersize the hole. With plywood, you will not be able to get the bulb through the sheet.

With Plywood, you can use heavier lights without having to worry about causing your design to buckle over.

Plywood will withstand a drop kick from a roof top with minimal damage. Coro will fold over or buckle.

there are probably more, I can't think of any right now.

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If you double the coro it is as strong as plywood. You just run the channels opposite of each other and glue the sheets together.

Coro is lighter to store and move around.

Interesting, could I do my design and place all the lights then add the 2nd sheet to the back? It would hold the lights in for sure and make it a lot less flimsy as well. I don't think I would glue it though in case I need to adjust something from the back. Great idea's I have never really thought about it.

Ted

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Interesting, could I do my design and place all the lights then add the 2nd sheet to the back? It would hold the lights in for sure and make it a lot less flimsy as well. I don't think I would glue it though in case I need to adjust something from the back. Great idea's I have never really thought about it.

Ted

I'm with Ted would the second sheet be used to hold the lights in and also help with storage and stacking since the cords are not exposed?

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Interesting, could I do my design and place all the lights then add the 2nd sheet to the back? It would hold the lights in for sure and make it a lot less flimsy as well. I don't think I would glue it though in case I need to adjust something from the back. Great idea's I have never really thought about it.

Ted

I think what the poster was referring to was to glue two boards together, then put your lights in from the back. You would still be able to get to your lights if you needed.

By putting one sheet north/south and the other east/west, you make the coro reinforced and less likely to buckle in the direction of the channels.

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The main advantage to using coro over plywood is maintenance of the lights. The 10mm thick coro is typically used because you can push the light in from the back and have part of the bulb still sticking out from the front. No adhesive is needed to hold the bulb in place if you make the hole smaller than the bulb. Part of the bulb also lights up inside the coro flutes and give a little bit of a glow around the bulb. If you need to replace a bulb you simply push it in from the front, replace it from the back, and push it back through. If plywood was used you would have had to secure the bulb with some type of glue and then figure out how to replace the bulbs when they go out. Also for the plywood to be sturdy enough it would have to be 1/2" or thicker, and then the bulbs would not be able to poke through the plywood. You would still need to brace it in the yard somehow to keep the wind from blowing it over.

The coro will warp just like plywood if the lights generate too much heat or if it is not stored flat. Here are some pictures of my toy factory that show metal bracing and how the lights poke through the front. There is some warping on mime from storage but at night you can

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By putting one sheet north/south and the other east/west, you make the coro reinforced and less likely to buckle in the direction of the channels.

There is no need to put two pieces together as coro comes in different thicknesses and becomes very rigid as the thickness increases. The problem becomes the thicker the coro, the less bulb length that will be able to stick out the front.

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I was refereing to putting 2 pieces together for creating figures with. See the coro reindeer picture.

I use a frame system to make things like snowflakes for the roof by using a 1x2 frame with coro mounted on boths sides. The coro on the back is screwed on for ease of maintance. The coro on the back protects the wires and lights from being pulled out. See the attached picture.

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First of all, Thank you, Richard!

One huge reason why coro was better than plywood: I was able to do the layout, drilling, and lighting in my basement, then maneuver the panels up the stairs by bending it slightly. That let me do the bulk of the work in the nice cool air conditioning. I never would have been able to get plywood of the same size up the stairs.

On the downside, yes, heat was a problem. But only when I had alot of lights on, and the coro up against the wall, trapping the heat. So far, when I turn all the lights on to do bulb checking/replacement I haven't had any further heat issues.

The second coro problem I ran into happened while one of the sheets was loaded up with lghts, leaning against the fence, waiting for me to finish building its 2x4 frame. I turned my back for a few minutes and that bugger somehow started to slide down the fence, and eventually crease in the middle and double over. This was with 10 mm thick coro. Amazingly no lights broke, and now that it's well supported everything is fine.

I'd have to agree that the number one reason to use coro is that you can slightly undersize the holes and have them snuggly grab the lights.

Ted, I would definitely leave the back open. You're probably going to need to replace the lights at some point. I've replaced 47 bulbs in the four weeks since Light-Up Night.

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I was refereing to putting 2 pieces together for creating figures with. See the coro reindeer picture.

I use a frame system to make things like snowflakes for the roof by using a 1x2 frame with coro mounted on boths sides. The coro on the back is screwed on for ease of maintance. The coro on the back protects the wires and lights from being pulled out. See the attached picture.

nicely done!

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Actually it's a snow flake. You aren't the only one to say star though.

I put the snow flakes up on the roof without even climbing up there. I put a small rope over the garage to pull back and forth. I used heavy duty black fishing string to hoist the snowflake into position then tying it down in the back. I attached another string to the snowflake along the bottom that I pulled tight and tied off inside the garage to a small hook. This keeps the wind form flipping it over or off of the roof.

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I just called the local sign company that makes out race car decals for work. I asked them were I could get some coro. He told me of a local place in western Arkansas he gets his from. Mr. Plastics, and they are real reasonable. They will even cut it (for a small fee) if you want them to. Odds are, there is someone in your area.

Jeremy

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When it comes to purchasing coro, please don't forget about the "little guys". I purchased four sheets from a locally owned office supply company for $12 a sheet with no freight. I know what that means something to the small business people, because I own a small parts store that has to compete against the "box stores".

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  • 3 weeks later...

When it comes to purchasing coro, please don't forget about the "little guys". I purchased four sheets from a locally owned office supply company for $12 a sheet with no freight. I know what that means something to the small business people, because I own a small parts store that has to compete against the "box stores".

I must be doing something wrong. The cheaperest I can find for 10mm 4'X8' is $26 per sheet?? HELP!!!!!!

Im in San Jose CA

Thank you

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