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Chris A

Mounting C'9's to a 2 x 4

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Hello,

I'm trying to come up with a way to mount my C9's to a 2 x 4. I'm hoping to have sections of 2 x 4's that I can then place on my roof in hopes of reducing set up time.

I was going to try to staple the C9's to the wood but I'm afraid of a short and it becomes more of a permanent solution, if I have a bad socket , I have to remove all the staples and replace the whole string. I'm using 4 seperate strings so I can have 4 seperate colors. Lights are spaced at 2 inches. Any ideas?

Thanks, Chris

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Toymaker had a way to use vinal sideing strips, J-Channel then just screw it to the 2x4 Look at his post and you should find it.

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You can get the tabs for tie wraps and screw them down to your board. The tabs are 1 inch square, have 4 slots to insert the tie wraps and will allow you to remove and install tie wraps as much as you need to.

On a second note....I did lights the same way as you did but used a 1X2 board. With 4 strings you will need something heavier I think a 2X4 may be an over kill. Either way I added galvanized strips to keep the board from tipping over due to wind and these also kept the boards on the peak of the roof line. If you have a wide board it will be prone to tipping over on a ridge top.

The strips were 1 inch wide and 20 inches long fastened in the middle and bent to fit the roof pitch.

Anthony

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I used 1 x 3, primered them and painted them flat black. I have four light strings on each board with plugs on one end and recepticals on the other.

I stapled the lights on the boards using an electric stapler with a wire guide so I didn't run a staple into the wire.

To stabalize them and keep them from sliding down the roof I screwed "I" hooks into the edges and zip tied them together.

That's my suggestion.

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Chris, I've also made 4 color C9 "superstrings". I zip tied the strings together keeping the socket spacing as uniform as possible. My roof is shingled and so I just used a plastic light clip on each socket even across the ridge. I wanted to anchor the roof and house by running lights down the edges. I used 1x2s and used 3/4" plastic covered Romex staples nailed on to attach the custom length cords. I attached the light strips with an eye under the eve and a hook, and an eye at the bottom attached with wire to a stake. The sockets want to turn a bit but this can be solved by running a thin strip of wood lathe through the socket clips.

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I used 1 x 3, primered them and painted them flat black. I have four light strings on each board with plugs on one end and recepticals on the other.

I stapled the lights on the boards using an electric stapler with a wire guide so I didn't run a staple into the wire.

To stabalize them and keep them from sliding down the roof I screwed "I" hooks into the edges and zip tied them together.

That's my suggestion.

This is the way I would do it. 1x3 or 1x4, black, with a stapler made for electrical wire.

There are actually several different types of staplers. I have a (I think) T-34 stapler. It uses horseshoe metal staples with a wire guide. I have also seen staplers that use the plastic saddle type of staples. I would bite the bullet on price and use it instead.

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You can get the tabs for tie wraps and screw them down to your board. The tabs are 1 inch square, have 4 slots to insert the tie wraps and will allow you to remove and install tie wraps as much as you need to.

On a second note....I did lights the same way as you did but used a 1X2 board. With 4 strings you will need something heavier I think a 2X4 may be an over kill. Either way I added galvanized strips to keep the board from tipping over due to wind and these also kept the boards on the peak of the roof line. If you have a wide board it will be prone to tipping over on a ridge top.

The strips were 1 inch wide and 20 inches long fastened in the middle and bent to fit the roof pitch.

Anthony

Thanks everybody. I am using a 2 X 4 as opposed to a 1 x 3 or 2 x 2, because I'm attaching the lights with the wire across the 4 inch side. When I tried to run the wire length wise, I couldn't get the stapler in between the lights to fasten them.

I'm attaching the lights to the bottom of the roof right above the rain gutters. Next year I will move up to the top pitch.

Attaching the wire directly to the 2 x 4 is easy enough with the staple gun, but if a string goes bad, thats over a 100 staples to be removed. I may end up doing this anyway.

I like the vinyl siding idea, but I'm not sure if Home Depot in CA carries it since we don't have a lot of siding on houses here.

I'm going to look at the tabs for wire ties. Are they available at Home Depot? can you fasten them tight enough to keep the lights from moving? Do you have a picture of it?

Thanks, Chris

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I get these from Christmas Lights Etc and they work good. The part number for 100 pack is 16623. Cost is $22.95.

Cclip_2.jpg

Thanks. What orientation are those mounted. I want the lights pointing up, in a row. Is that possible with these?

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They can mount any way you want. Horizontal or vertical. One side is for C9s and the other is for C7s. In the picture the C7 is on top and the C9 is on the bottom. The clip is about 2 inches long.

Greg

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I am just finishing the same thing. I am making

C9 light bars with 6 circuits and 2" spacing.

I started with 2x4s and ripped them down to 2 7/8",then ripped 3/4" off and reattached with all weather screws.

Then drilled 7/8" holes on 2" centers, 1" deep ,I drilled the holes 1/8" off center of the seam between the 3/4" piece and the 2" piece to create a C shaped hole so the sockets would snap in place.

After the holes are all drilled , take apart and using a dado blade or router table make a 1/2" x1/2" channel for the wires.

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I used Olympic exterior stain on the inside and out to seal and protect from the weather.

Install light strings, cut off all the clips :eek: , screw on face piece and your done.

I also attached icicle lights and strobes to the bars.

It should save me several days on set up and tear down every year and the stringers should last for years being protected against UV radiation.

Tim H.

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I used Olympic exterior stain on the inside and out to seal and protect from the weather.

Install light strings, cut off all the clips :eek: , screw on face piece and your done.

I also attached icicle lights and strobes to the bars.

It should save me several days on set up and tear down every year and the stringers should last for years being protected against UV radiation.

Tim H.

WOW these look great, i have one question what did you do when the boards "ran out" like what did you do betwedn boards or did you make the boards like 25' long?

Thanks,

Will

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WOW these look great, i have one question what did you do when the boards "ran out" like what did you do betwedn boards or did you make the boards like 25' long?

Thanks,

Will

Those look great and labor intensive. Any tricks I should know about before I try something like this?

Will, I'm guessing at the end of the board you cut the string and attach a female and male to continue on. Thus creating custom length C9 strings.

Chris

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I posted a response to this thread, and do not see it now.

Tim, even though you have put stain in the channel, how do you expect to drain the water that does get into that area?

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I saw Therberg's light bar in person. Those pictures do not do it justice at all.

Ditto! This is a good set up.

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Tim, even though you have put stain in the channel, how do you expect to drain the water that does get into that area?

I hope he chacks in, but from what I remember, between the 2x4 halves, there is a groove cut from one end to the other where the wires are tucked into. I thought Tim said the groove was large enough not only to hold wires but to allow water to drain should some get in there. From what I saw, the light sockets themselves fit fairly snuggly into holes (but not tight) and there is not a lot of room for water to get by the socket into that groove.

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WOW. That is amazing.

I'm not a C9 guy myself. However for those who are, what a great idea. I will keep a note of this for when I can upgrade to bigger LED's that use the C9 base.

Great work.

I don't use C9s myself, but what's really interesting is that this same mounting technique was applied to candy canes as well. A 2x4 (or maybe 2x6, not sure which) had equally spaced holes (maybe 6" apart) drilled into the 2" side of the 2x4. The candy canes were then placed/mounted in the holes. All of the candy canes can then be placed in the yard quickly, without worrying about them falling over or being crooked...nice.

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Those look great and labor intensive. Any tricks I should know about before I try something like this?

Chris

The first one took a bit of time but after that the rest went quickly. I tried to find the best 2x4's in the pile, straight grain and minimal knots .

WOW these look great, i have one question what did you do when the boards "ran out" like what did you do between boards or did you make the boards like 25' long?

Thanks,

Will

Some of my boards are 19' and 17', you could make them any size, it just means a lot more vampire plugs or molex connectors.

I saw Therberg's light bar in person. Those pictures do not do it justice at all.

Hi Ed , Thank You

Tim, even though you have put stain in the channel, how do you expect to drain the water that does get into that area?

The ones that I just made are for the gable ends of my roof that face the street. The pitch of the roof is 8/12, so any water should easily drain out. If I make some any horizontal areas I was thinking of using a paddle bit instead of a forstner and drill just deep enough so the point makes drain holes.

The reason the sockets are not centered in the 2x3 is so the bulbs clear my drip edge and shingles.

Tim

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So i have one more question about the length, when you have two boards that meet up on the ends what do you do to hold the two boards together?

-Will

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So how do you secure the 2x4's to the roof to keep them from sliding off?

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So i have one more question about the length, when you have two boards that meet up on the ends what do you do to hold the two boards together?

-Will

For the candy cane boards, Tim used door hinges. Pull the pin and they come right apart. He really did do a good job on these projects.

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So how do you secure the 2x4's to the roof to keep them from sliding off?

I was just about to ask the same question. This is something I want to do this year, but I am not sure how to do it.

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