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Woofnine

Mini-Trees...my method

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In my case, the viewing of my display is done from a fairly confined angle. Thus, I only wrapped my trees from side to side. If I was in a situation where viewing could be done from the sides or back of the display I would go all the way around.

As to using coro, it is certainly a lighter alternative to plywood but in my experience, the coro does not do well against UV and breaks down somewhat, cracking and breaking much easier than when new. The top section of the tree half with the groove in the top is a bit fragile and could easily break with brittle coro. (Warpage of this area can be a problem with too-thin plywood as well)

I prefer the weight and enduring strength of plywood.

Your mileage may vary!

BTW...now that I've used these for a season, I have to say they worked very well...we particularly liked color fade effects going from one color of lights to another. White paint was, for us, the right choice

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Good information! I was thinking that the half with the groove up top would be made of plywood, and the coro half would have the groove on the bottom. This would prevent the top being too fragile as it would be solid wood. I'm still trying to decide.

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I'm really liking the looks of these as well! My only concern is I don't have flat ground where all my mini trees are placed, so how could I adjust these to contour to the ground? (currently I use the easel's and just push the high side in the ground further)

I really do like the "real tree" look though!

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These trees look like the ticket for me....One question. How did ya stake them into the ground and do you have pictures of the method?

Thanks

Rocky

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TysonHphoto:

My yard has a slope to it. I adjusted by putting short pieces of wood onder the low sides. Bricks, stones, whatever would work here, snow buries it so nobody sees it. In areas without snow I'd drive a stake in the ground and wire tie the tree to it for leveling.

Rocky777:

These are heavy enough the staking them down is not necessary. I just put 'em where I want 'em and that's it

jsattmann:

A couple of the early posts have pictures at night. Look at #16 and #18

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I think these trees are....are....are...super sweet!! I was trying to buy tomato cages yesterday so i can take advantage of some free time and start wrapping them. Luckily, they were out until spring. Then i came across this post, and i had half a sheet of plywood so i cut out half of a tree per your design. I love it already and i've only done one half! So i was thinking/wondering...how would it look and what would you think of making half of the tree out of plywood and the other half out of coro? Just thinking that cutting the plywood is alot more messy and time consuming opposed to cutting out coro.

I cut mine on a CNC machine so coro or plywood are just as easy to make. I did use these plywood, four sided mini trees in my display this year and I didn't have any problem with them. The issue I do have with them is that they waste half the lights on the backside of the tree which is facing the house. Hence, that is why I came up with the Coro MiniTree.

Thoughts before i run out and buy more plywood/coro?

In addition to the plywood minitrees, I ran my coro minitrees. In the photo below, the six trees in the front are 500 count multi's. In the back behind them, are two 500 count whites. If you look close, you'll see the light behind the plywood arches. Look behind the white Coro MiniTrees - see that nice clean flood flood that isn't "washed out" from the mini tree in front of it? Yep - that's the advanage of the Coro MiniTree. Plus, they actually LOOK like trees... much better looking during the day than tomato cages.

However, the coro tree design i saw (which i also really liked) is a bit lightweight and could easily be destroyed by the wind (we have massive windstorms every year, this year we had 3 consecutive days of 50+ up to 90mph winds) so the plywood half of the tree would aid in supporting the tree.

I've heard this several times from different people but my testing shows differently. During a storm that blew through and brought down lots of displays in our area, I didn't have a SINGLE problem - I even have video to show that. I've also taken the leaf blower to them (95 MPH) and not had any problems with them blowing over. They are a lot stronger than they appear.

Plus, if you have 90MPH winds, I'm guessing that you had more than a few things blowing around in your yard also - traditional mini trees, mega trees, blow molds, cutouts, etc.

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I like both...honestly i do! Coro is difficult to find around here, but i have enough plywood for about half of the trees i need. I know you are looking at offering them cut and drilled for a price....but i can't wait until Feb for a quote, i would like to have this project completed before my schedule gets beyond hectic starting in about 2 weeks. I don't question the strength and integrity of the coro trees. If you've tested them, that works for me. I don't have a CNC machine, so plywood is more difficult to work with than coro for me...although i'm fairly handy so not really an issue. Cost seems to be the same, so again a non issue except that i already have half of the plywood necessary. So really the easiest and quickest route is what i'm after, but not at the expense of quality and looks.

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Mine have done just fine. However, I put two coats of primer and a topcoat on them which should help. Also, although we have received a lot of precip, the temps have been below freezing almost continuously since they went out the weekend before Thanksgiving so the wood hasn't really been wet for any sustained period of time.

Since everything is iced in I won't be able to take the trees down until the ground is almost bare so if they're going to warp it will be in the time frame when things are melting and staying wet. Stay tuned!

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First i'd like to thank God, thank you God. Second i'd like to say thank you to my mom, my inspiration...thank you mom. And lastly i'd like to say thank you to woofnine and dmoore for giving me this idea for trees!! This was my first ever handling of Coro, but it was fairly easy to use. Right now i've used the 3D tree that woofnine built using plywood, but i used Coro. Then i went ahead and punched holes for the lights the way dmoore did. I'm not sure if this is what i'll keep or not, i'm still brainstorming and trying out ideas. The coro is VERY lightweight and definately needs to be staked down. I'm still leaning towards using this 3D design, but having half of the tree in coro and the other half in plywood. This would help weigh it down, but allow me to punch lights through the material.

The first pic is from the front. The second pic is from...the back!! LOL. There are 100 clear and i'll be adding 100 green once i know what design to use.

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However, the coro tree design i saw (which i also really liked) is a bit lightweight and could easily be destroyed by the wind (we have massive windstorms every year, this year we had 3 consecutive days of 50+ up to 90mph winds) so the plywood half of the tree would aid in supporting the tree. Thoughts before i run out and buy more plywood/coro?

I finally finished all the design and testing on the CoroTrees and to answer your question about how well they hold up in the wind, here is a 100mph wind test using a high power leaf bower:

http://www.vimeo.com/8939180

I'd say they stand up pretty well to the wind.

Here is where you can find them: www.HolidayCoro.com

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As to using coro, it is certainly a lighter alternative to plywood but in my experience, the coro does not do well against UV and breaks down somewhat, cracking and breaking much easier than when new. The top section of the tree half with the groove in the top is a bit fragile and could easily break with brittle coro. (Warpage of this area can be a problem with too-thin plywood as well)

I'm not sure if prior experiences with coro didn't include UV stabilized coro or not - but coro that is UV stabilized should last years outside. Coro, which is generally made from polypropylene has working temps from -17f to 160f (http://www.coroplast.com/resin.htm). My testing over the past few months shows no degradation in quality - even for green an clear coro.

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