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  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
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  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
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  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
tfischer

LED lifespan

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So far, the LED strings I've boughten from local retailers are averaging less lifespan than my cheap old incancesdents. I'm a little grumpy right now-- I just had another string go half-dead. Why? It's rusted silly. This would have been season #3 for it. I wonder if I made up the difference for using a $11 string of lights instead of a 80-cent one I already owned? :rolleyes: Meanwhile my mega-tree lights are going on season #7 (although I've recolored some of them, and probably will more of them this year), and some of my other lights are even older...

I like the look of LED's, but I'm sure not convinced there's any savings. In fact, I'm convinced they're costing me a magnitude more...

First you must understand that LED's are not real christmas lights.

Second I don't think they are yet up to standards. SOme expensive nes can be good, most big box store ones are not.

My endevor into LED was two years ago, and the lights lasted about 2 weeks.

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First you must understand that LED's are not real christmas lights.

Second I don't think they are yet up to standards. SOme expensive nes can be good, most big box store ones are not.

My endevor into LED was two years ago, and the lights lasted about 2 weeks.

Not real Christmas lights? If you mean they don't heat up, don't send your electric bill to the stratosphere and don't start with washed out colors that get even more washed out when the paint fades, then I see your point. No, they're not the same as the traditional ones, and I do have a single string of C7s I use for indoor decorating just for the look of the W-shaped filament in a non-faded, dark colored bulb (I searched hard for extra dark ones), but outdoors it's all LED. Beautiful, pure colors, no fading and low power consumption outweigh the non-traditional look.

It's unfortunate that so many people are having reliability issues, I have 7 strings of 70 that are on their third year with only a single bulb failure. I use them 8 hours a day from November to February and leave them up all summer. They came from a box store too (Costco).

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I think it is going to be awhile before I switch to LED. It takes about $150 to power my display for the season but it would cost $15,000+ to replace all the lights I use in my display to full wave LEDs. I can replace all my lights with incandescents for $1500 with after Christmas sales and around $3200 if paying full retail price.

It would take 10 years to break even with LEDs and I have serious doubts that the strings would make it that long with all the problems I hear. Also there is no way I could even afford $15,000 for LED lights at this point of my life even if they did last 10 years.

I believe in saving energy but there are a lot of other areas in my energy usage life where I can cut down and make up a whole lot more than $150 without spending $13,000 to do it.

As soon as it makes sense to go to LED, I am sure I will switch.

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Don't I have to save the receipt to get a replacement after the 3 years?? Or is that just a false? Anything else that I know of that has had to be replaced has required a receipt? maybe i should make "electronic" copies of it??

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Don't I have to save the receipt to get a replacement after the 3 years?? Or is that just a false? Anything else that I know of that has had to be replaced has required a receipt? maybe i should make "electronic" copies of it??

I have all my receipts and box barcodes in one location for fast retrieval if I ever need them... along with my replacement bulbs and fuses in ziploc baggies labeled with a sharpie as to what they are for (100ct ES, reg 100ct, etc.)

Handy little box at times! ;)

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Don't I have to save the receipt to get a replacement after the 3 years?? Or is that just a false? Anything else that I know of that has had to be replaced has required a receipt? maybe i should make "electronic" copies of it??

I would scan it, we all know what happens to receipts nowdays with the heat paper that they use. just look in your coat pocket from last winter, can't read that receipt can you?

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I would scan it, we all know what happens to receipts nowdays with the heat paper that they use. just look in your coat pocket from last winter, can't read that receipt can you?

You must have some hot pockets! :P

I have receipts from 3 years ago in my "little box" that I can read just fine (happened to look at them a few days ago)

Making a backup copy is probably still a good idea though! ;)

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thats good, most of my receipts wear off too.. some have stuck though. I am just thinking for "future reference" as i know how places can be these days about getting any good warranty coverage on a product.. most things are terrible!

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To tell the truth, I don't count anymore. I tell people "around 40,000" but I could be north or south of that by several thousand...

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Thats nearly what I do anymore.. there's to many to try and do an exact count. I do know that my mega tree has about 10,000 lights on it just by its self. I was just curious.. I think I am close to 40,000 like 35,000 probably.. but im not sure. Just thought I would ask since you were one of the people that helped me when I needed it to get going and such. Good luck with your 2009 display.

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To tell the truth, I don't count anymore. I tell people "around 40,000" but I could be north or south of that by several thousand...

Jeez Tim.....what kind of serious decorator are you? Real decorators can tell you down to the bulb. 40,289.5 bulbs.....7654' of extension cord and powered by 112 windows 7 computer controlled channels sequenced to a FM frequency of 107.3 FM with a transmit range of 289.66' :giggle:

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Jeez Tim.....what kind of serious decorator are you? Real decorators can tell you down to the bulb. 40,289.5 bulbs.....7654' of extension cord and powered by 112 windows 7 computer controlled channels sequenced to a FM frequency of 107.3 FM with a transmit range of 289.66' :giggle:

I remember close to 10 years ago, there were discussions here on whether people could count lights they had blackout caps on, etc...

Some people take it pretty seriously. I just make up numbers if people push me for them :) Last I did a rigid count 3-4 seasons ago, I was just north of 35K, and I've added a bit since then... Next year, I'm toying with removing several thousand tree lights and replacing them with LED RGB uplight floods. The effect should be much cooler, but it will cause my bulb count to go down considerably... Switching to LED's has also 'hurt' a bit, as I usually replace 100 strings with 70's...

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Don't I have to save the receipt to get a replacement after the 3 years?? Or is that just a false? Anything else that I know of that has had to be replaced has required a receipt? maybe i should make "electronic" copies of it??

Jeremy, call the manufacturer to find out what's required. I had saved all UPCs and receipts. When I went to get a bad string of GE LEDs replaced, I called the manufacturer, Santa's Best Craft, and was told the date code molded into the plug was all that was required. No receipt needed (unless they weren't manufactured in the year you bought them. Then save the receipts.)

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(If you mean they don't heat up) This is why they rust, no heat means the moisture stays inside the connections. I don't have any LED yet, but my blue mini's look clear this year, after using them for 3 years. I guess i'll have to stick with the mini's...

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<aside>

I'm really enjoying this thread. What could be more fun than ranting about LED's, punctuated occasionally by completely off-topic pictures, mainly of food items? :)

</aside>

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<aside>

I'm really enjoying this thread. What could be more fun than ranting about LED's, punctuated occasionally by completely off-topic pictures, mainly of food items? :)

</aside>

agreed! :)

guyfieri_web.jpg

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