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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready??? Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

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    How many times per second do the LED strobes normally flash? Can they fit in a normal C-9 strand?

    LED "strobes" really should be called something different IMHO. Yes, they blink brightly, but I really don't think you can compare them side by side against a good Xenon strobe.

    LED Blinkers, maybe. ;) So the old style Xenon strobes are the Flashy Flashy and the new LED style are the Blinky Blinky! :giggle:

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    I would say no - I'm afraid they would get destroyed by the LOR system.

    In reference to the dripping icicle tubes, can someone explain to me why this would be? It would seem to a relative novice that if you were just using the LOR to turn them on and off that it would be no different than being connected to any other switched circuit. Thanks.

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    Paul - do you have a vendor and prices for net lights? If so, will you have nets of a solid color (i.e. all red, all blue, etc..) as well as warm white and multi color?

    Here goes the budget....the CFO....Er, wife will NOT be happy....LOL

    I should have that tomorrow.

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    Hello All. New to PC (and first time poster) and planning on first time order with Paul.

    2 quick question probably any member can answer, but I can't seem to find on boards.

    1. Is there any issue to "mixing" different count strings end to end? (having a 50 plugged into a 300, 150, etc....) I have a 13' "Merry Christmas" sign I made this year (2009) in Coroplast, last minute. Due to low volume of lights in stores by mid December, ended up mixing ES and regular mini IC strings (and yes, very noticeable). Want to convert to LEDs and to keep as close to actual number of lights needed (430 Merry and 720 Christmas), I was planning on mixing 50 and 70 count strings. One vendor site on a FAQ said "NEVER EVER EVER mix counts due to voltage diferences"

    2. Will the 18 guage Weather-X Zipcord work with my existing bags of SPT2 male and female plugs, or do I need the "Attachon" plugs from CDI (which look the same but may have different spacing/width for the zipcord?)

    I know this isn't exactly the right board for this, but since I am asking about the M6 LEDs and zipcord I plan on ordering from Paul, I hope you let it slide. (Be gentle with the noobie)

    Thanks

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    Paul:

    What about the blue net lights, is there a different manufacturer for these this year? The 2008 and 2009 model was horrible. I've already had 5 of my 9 brand new blue nets on my palm trees fail. Some failed in the first few days of use. It seems a couple of them are very dim, while the rest just stopped working altogether.

    We had the same thing... 1/2 the CDI blue net lights died the very first night they were used, the remainders remained reliable for the season. We had to buy target's blue nets to fill the gaps and not a single one of those failed except they were smaller foot print and lighter light structure.

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    Each string of lights tells you how many amps or whats used. You want to limit I believe the entire load to about 350 watts or about 2 amps. Add it up that way and observe the 2 amp load limit, maybe 2.5 amps and you will be fine mixing and matching whatever you have, even between LED and non-LED or ES or non-ES. The idea is not to go over the 3 amp fuse limit on the first string in a chain. Sizing the load close to it like 2.75 amps is not reliable as heat will generate and eventually burn up the fuse rated limit, so if you stay well below it, the first fuse will remain reliable.

    Hello All. New to PC (and first time poster) and planning on first time order with Paul.

    2 quick question probably any member can answer, but I can't seem to find on boards.

    1. Is there any issue to "mixing" different count strings end to end? (having a 50 plugged into a 300, 150, etc....) I have a 13' "Merry Christmas" sign I made this year (2009) in Coroplast, last minute. Due to low volume of lights in stores by mid December, ended up mixing ES and regular mini IC strings (and yes, very noticeable). Want to convert to LEDs and to keep as close to actual number of lights needed (430 Merry and 720 Christmas), I was planning on mixing 50 and 70 count strings. One vendor site on a FAQ said "NEVER EVER EVER mix counts due to voltage diferences"

    2. Will the 18 guage Weather-X Zipcord work with my existing bags of SPT2 male and female plugs, or do I need the "Attachon" plugs from CDI (which look the same but may have different spacing/width for the zipcord?)

    I know this isn't exactly the right board for this, but since I am asking about the M6 LEDs and zipcord I plan on ordering from Paul, I hope you let it slide. (Be gentle with the noobie)

    Thanks

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    Thanks, Joseph.

    I'm fine on the current draw (with the mini IC's im using now well under 2.4A on each end to end conected long string). One of the vendor pages' FAQ said mixing counts would cause them to "prematurely fail" which I found odd since each 50 bulb circuit draws the same (unless ES vs SB) so why would it matter how many series you have (ie 3 series of 50 for 150, plugged into a 6 series string of 300).

    ..and thanks to all the PC members out there. Very inspired after finding this site. All the great posts, advice gave me the courage to start with building the coro sign. Wireframes and LOR next......

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    Each string of lights tells you how many amps or whats used. You want to limit I believe the entire load to about 350 watts or about 2 amps. Add it up that way and observe the 2 amp load limit, maybe 2.5 amps and you will be fine mixing and matching whatever you have, even between LED and non-LED or ES or non-ES. The idea is not to go over the 3 amp fuse limit on the first string in a chain. Sizing the load close to it like 2.75 amps is not reliable as heat will generate and eventually burn up the fuse rated limit, so if you stay well below it, the first fuse will remain reliable.

    Actually the UL limit per load is 210 watts. That might be why you had problems with your net lights!

    Edited by paul sessel
    additional thought
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    Actually the UL limit per load is 210 watts. That might be why you had problems with your net lights!

    In our case, the net light is off a 3-way with nothing passing thru it. They ride along side archways so that when the arches are having a tunnel effect, the net lights greatly intensify the tunnel effect. Whats odd was the blue net lights, when they went bad, maybe just one row would light, like 6 individual lights, the west of the string remained dark, These did this within the first 3 days of the display and oddly this year we had almost nothing go bad out of 200,000 LED lights at the Lamas' display except those 5 or 6 blue nets and I think 3 LED strobes were dead on arrival and never lighted the first time. The circuits that held the net lights had around 10 watts total on them.

    Not all the LED's came from you, 2 years ago the Lamas's got Home Depot's entire stock of left over LED lights for $1 per string after Christmas and ended up with $500 worth at this price. The man lives here and worked in Miami building new Home Depots stores and locked in cleaning out a distribution center's left over LED lights.

    The green nets held up like champ. We are not at all mad about it, we got a couple thousand dollars worth of lights from you and only had a very small portion that had troubles and are looking to buy more lights from you, just we are thinking to take straight line strings and make them look like netlights rather then buy more net lights in future. We are reviewing how many lights and what type we want to buy in your pre-sale.

    Edited by Joseph Ayo
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    how physically big are the cases of lights?

    can you calculate shipping ahead of time? depending on how much shipping is it might be best for me to come out and pick up my lights.. or since it looks like ill be ordering at least 20 cases maybe pallet truck ship instead of regular UPS?

    -Christopher

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    how physically big are the cases of lights?

    can you calculate shipping ahead of time? depending on how much shipping is it might be best for me to come out and pick up my lights.. or since it looks like ill be ordering at least 20 cases maybe pallet truck ship instead of regular UPS?

    -Christopher

    I think last year Paul said you could estimate the shipping being 5% or 10% of the order total. It does seem like it would be cheaper to ship by truck line at some point.

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    I think last year Paul said you could estimate the shipping being 5% or 10% of the order total. It does seem like it would be cheaper to ship by truck line at some point.

    I asked him earlier this month and if I remember right, he said $40 for 3 cases. So you looking at roughly a $1 a string which is about what I remember hearing last year as well.

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    since im growing my display I will need lots of extension cords.. I have never entertained the thought of making my own cordsets before.. but it looks like I can get the wire and the plugs and make my own for less cost than that of buying cords at lowes or HD.. (with the exception of 6 footers.. I see those on sale at Big lots for 89 cents often)..

    but for any runs 9 feet and longer its definately a deal.. so I have a couple questions..

    1] are the cords that are made with the CDI plugs and wire any more susceptible to freeze damage? molded cords dont have any issues.. but im wondering with snap-on plugs if there is more likliehood of water getting in, freezing and cracking the plugs...

    2] are cords made with the above products any more susceptible to GFCI trips than buying pre-made cords?

    -Christopher

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    No and no. Any cord/plug if it is in standing water probably is going to trip a GFCI. As long as they are placed as such the water drains through them, something we all try to keep in mind while we make our connections, one is not any more likely than the other to have problems. The vampire plugs actually seal fairly tight. I had to press mine together with a channelock.

    Lenny

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    Vampire plugs to NOT seal tight. You only need channel locks (I use my teeth, actually) because of the tight fit around the top/bottom of wire and the teeth biting in. There are still plenty of little spaces for water to get in around the wire.

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