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taybrynn

1/2" grey conduit - how to separate?

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Ok, I bought a couple of those 10' loing 1/2" grey conduit sections from Home Depot (with the flared ends) and made myself a new little skirt for the megatree ... and it worked nicely.

My question is -- how do I separate the pieces now that its time to store the megatree parts?

I never glued it, just inserted the ends into the flares and they have stuck ... but now I can't separate and don't know the proper way to disassemble my giant hoop.

Thanks in advance,

Scott / taybrynn

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Ok, I bought a couple of those 1/2" grey conudit with the flared ends and made myself a new little skirt for the megatree ... and it worked nicely.

My question is -- how do I separate the pieces now that its time to store the megatree parts?

I never glued it, just insert the ends into the flares and they have stuck ... but now I can't separate and don't know the proper way to disassemble my giant hoop.

Thanks in advance,

Scott / taybrynn

I use two "Channel lock" pliers. Just wiggle (rotate) them while pulling and they'll come right apart.

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Thanks, I'll try that. :)

I did briefly try using some vice grips, but didn't get it apart ... and didn't want to destroy in the process.

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Ok, I bought a couple of those 10' loing 1/2" grey conduit sections from Home Depot (with the flared ends) and made myself a new little skirt for the megatree ... and it worked nicely.

My question is -- how do I separate the pieces now that its time to store the megatree parts?

I never glued it, just inserted the ends into the flares and they have stuck ... but now I can't separate and don't know the proper way to disassemble my giant hoop.

Thanks in advance,

Scott / taybrynn

Picture of it in action. I am little lost.

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It's just two pieces of the 1/2 grey emt that I put together (into a circle).

Maybe the problem is that I (a) didn't take inside (not sure how to take in a 10' hoop anywhere but the garage) and (B) didn't straighten it enough prior to pulling apart?

I think you have all given me some good advice to try.

I was getting frustrated with it today ... and almost ready to just cut it and trash it ... as its $1.80 for both pieces and hardly worth the trouble, but I don't want to waste it for no reason.

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I actually keep mine together and hang it from the rafters in the garage its out of the way for us, but when i took it apart once i put the "coupler" against my waist and pushed the other side of the circle against a wall so i made it an oval and it took the pressure off it enough to pull it apart.

-Will

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It won't help you NOW, but I sanded down then ends before putting mine together, then drilled a hole and drove a screw through to hold them together. Then when teardown happens, I unscrew the screw and it pulls right apart.

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It won't help you NOW, but I sanded down then ends before putting mine together, then drilled a hole and drove a screw through to hold them together. Then when teardown happens, I unscrew the screw and it pulls right apart.

That's really ingenius! I may have to use that when I redo my driveway arches!!!

Good idea! I always thought if you put a bit of grease on it too when it went together it may come apart easier as well..

-Evan

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I just had my wife take the other end and we have a tug of war with it until it comes apart... She only falls over 3 or 4 times before it finally lets go...

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Grey PVC is just that, PVC

EMT is a light weight conduit made of steel. The connectors slip on and have set screws.

IMC is a light weight conduit made of steel. It is a bit thicker than EMT. I doubt you will ever use this, it is normally only available at an electrical supply house.

Rigid is a heavy duty conduit made of steel with threads on each end.

There is also aluminum rigid.

Someone already answered how to do this. 2 pairs of channel locks and twist apart...

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I have one that does not want to come apart either. i plan to warm it up with my heat gun once that piece becomes the last one left. Or maybe it will be warmer out by the time I get around to it. LOL Actually at 85 cents each I might just cut it and buy two new pieces.

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I just can't bring myself to do that. I have 10 foot sections of PVC I have been using for six years and it's still going strong. It would be such a waster to cut it up and throw it away.

Just my 2 cents

Marilyin

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My mega-tree base was created in 2003 and I finally had to replace one section (out of 3) this year because I was careless during teardown last year and smashed the flared end of it (I think I stepped on it in the cold). Other than that it's been going strong - I pull the sections apart and store them up in the attic each year.

I have markings on it for where the legs go and where each string falls -- would be a major PITA to redo it each year.

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I have markings on it for where the legs go and where each string falls -- would be a major PITA to redo it each year.
It is, but my ring just threads through those twisty dog stakes and this thing helps me with the rest (I'm just trying to justify my actions to myself since I know they are wasteful and I probably could easily save it).

attachment.php?attachmentid=25237&d=1257731948

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Scott, a bit late for this year, since you have to get them apart, but next year, Sand the mating end down a bit, then spread a little Vaseline on the end before mating into the bell. This will make dis-assembly a snap. This is what I use on my LLA's (I join 2 10' sections for my LLA's)

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Guest csx5861

I'd try some hot water on it myself, not extremely hot, just hot enough to help expand the pipes, then they should slip right out of each other and come right apart. It's what I use when something is really stuck together and I know it was just "pushed" or "forced" together.

But if it's really cold, do this very carefully and slowly, otherwise you'll end up splitting or cracking the pipe! And have to buy another one anyway.

Good Luck!

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Beer... lots of beer :D

ROFLMAO!!!

I would try releasing the pressure on the joint. I get mine apart the same way will suggested.

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I've started using vaseline on my arches too. It helps a lot and I haven't noticed any issues with it degrading the plastice pipe yet.

With or without vaseline I've had good luck using a specially formed piece of flat steel stock that fits around the inner pipe and pounding it against the collar of the outer pipe with a hammer.

Someone else already mentioned this but for a mega tree ring, you would probably need someone to bend the ring to remove some of the pressure from the fitting.

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