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Can you spray paint rope light?


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short answer yes. Krylon stained glass paint works. Don't know, I hate the color blue so never use blue mini lights. I can tolerate blue LEDs so do use some of them but no blue minis.

marilyn

Edited by nanac1
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Mark,

I use ropelight a lot on wire frames, and all of them have clear ropelight on them, with painted in colors, the same krylon that Marilyn talked about. There's one minor problem with the Krylon stained glass paint on ropelight, it stays tacky for awhile after painting. It's really no big deal, and you can shorten the drying time by putting it out in the sun, or in the wind. Most of my painted ropelight wireframes have been out for the past 5 years, with very minimal fading. In fact, I have a Sea Creature with a Santa Hat on, that I drag with me when I do a demo, and he is half Green Ropelight, and half Painted Clear ropelight. You cannot tell the difference, even close up.

Bill

Not sure where to post this, but here we go.

Just wondering if you can spray paint rope light?

If so, any specific paint that works better and how long does it last?

What have you experienced

Thanks

Mark

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I second the KRYLON x-metals make shure to clean the rope light with alcohol be for painting .Use light coats till you get the contrast you want/need .I have only found them in blue red and purple it also will not scratch off to easy it worked great on one of my motif that skis ith is great just tape up the section you dont need painted and paint away then if you have left over rope light use black tape to cover no one will ever see it at night...!!!

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to answer a post about blue minis'' it will allow you to get another year out of them however I find they are not the deep blue that they were when they were new.. too many coast and the lights get way dim.. I used it on my mini trees this year just because I knew i only had to get 2009 out of them and they are going LED for 2010.. it did good for the purpose I used it.. so I didnt see all kinds of speckled white spots... it isa tough to get it even on mini lights ..I found it was best to paint it with the lights on the trees.. have a feeling I may have to cut the trings to get them off as they may be painted together.. I did them in the summer so left them outdoors to dry..

-Christopher

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to answer a post about blue minis'' it will allow you to get another year out of them however I find they are not the deep blue that they were when they were new.. too many coast and the lights get way dim.. I used it on my mini trees this year just because I knew i only had to get 2009 out of them and they are going LED for 2010.. it did good for the purpose I used it.. so I didnt see all kinds of speckled white spots... it isa tough to get it even on mini lights ..I found it was best to paint it with the lights on the trees.. have a feeling I may have to cut the trings to get them off as they may be painted together.. I did them in the summer so left them outdoors to dry..

-Christopher

Thanks, sounds like its not worth it unless you are hard up for $$.

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  • 2 months later...

(edited from multiple posts on DIYC)

I just finished restringing my Snowman with new 3/8" clear. ropelight (http://www.landolights.com/main/component/option,com_ponygallery/func,detail/id,40/Itemid,62/) using Krylon X-Metals to paint sections of it. If I had to pick one word on how well it turned out, it would be 'excellent'.

I did a quick test to confirm the X-Metals paint worked well (not that I expected it to fail). For the test, I didn't do any prep (acetone/alcohol/or scrubbie) on the 1/2" rope light I used -- just a couple of quick sprays of the product. When I used the real 3/8" spool of rope light, I wiped it down with 91% Isopropyl.

The paint applied well with no beading or running. On one area I applied 2 coats for a nice deep red color. After 30 mins the paint was dry to the touch, and remained flexible enough for me to put a sharp kink in (180 degree) without the paint failing. After a day it was completely cured.

The snowman now appears as if it is brand new, and looks identical to my Santa that hasn't been restrung yet. The whole thing was a bit time consuming: Documenting how the old rope light was on the frame, temporarilly attaching the new rope light to mark off the color locations, taking it back off, then putting it back on when painted took around 12 hours. The actual painting only took about 20 mins. My fingers are sore from the 200+ zip ties, and I was using a zip tie gun ;)

I purchased these 2 pieces 10 years ago for around $80 each. I am very happy that I'm going to be able to display them for another 10 years.

Pictures and DIY article coming soon!

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