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Just bought some vintage candles and was wondering what type of bulb they take.Also i bought a 23 inch and a 16 inch snowmen with no cords and was wondering where to get them and is the size of the bulb different for different size blow molds.

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They came with regular house bulbs but what wattage.

You can use up to a 60W bulb in most blow molds. But, with that being said, 60W is definitely overkill. With a standard edison base socket, you can use a far lower wattage bulb and still have excellent illumination. Try a 40W bulb for starters and you can adjust up or down from there.

Generally, I use 15W bulbs in all of my molds. But, there is a TON of ambient light in my yard.

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Guest A.F.NUT

I usually just use a 15 watt bulb in the candles that's enough for them. The rest of my molds get a 40 watt cfl that uses just the 9 watts and they are bright, in some cases too bright, but they save a ton of power! Tom

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Guest A.F.NUT

I use those 40 watt energy saver bulbs that only use 10 watts of power. Nice and bright and can run more molds on one circut.

That's what mine are but they use only 9 watts , must depend on the brand. It is a great way to save energy and use more molds. I could never have used as many molds as I did this year with regular bulbs! Tom

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Just bought some vintage candles and was wondering what type of bulb they take.Also i bought a 23 inch and a 16 inch snowmen with no cords and was wondering where to get them and is the size of the bulb different for different size blow molds.

Hi. i use 25 watt bulbs in all my blow molds. c7 in all the small ones.i used 40watts in my empire candles and the bulb melted the top. so now i just use 25watts.

thanks john.

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Just bought some vintage candles and was wondering what type of bulb they take.

They came with regular house bulbs but what wattage.

You can use up to a 60W bulb in most blow molds. But, with that being said, 60W is definitely overkill. With a standard edison base socket, you can use a far lower wattage bulb and still have excellent illumination. Try a 40W bulb for starters and you can adjust up or down from there.

I used 40 watts in all of mine.

I usually just use a 15 watt bulb in the candles that's enough for them.

I use those 40 watt energy saver bulbs that only use 10 watts of power.

i use 25 watt bulbs in all my blow molds. c7 in all the small ones.i used 40watts in my empire candles and the bulb melted the top. so now i just use 25watts.

Take special note of John's (pa blow molds) post. You should use bulbs that are 25 watts or less in candles. There is not that much space between the bulb and the flame. It can easily be damaged (or ruined) by the heat of the bulb melting the plastic! It also helps to use a flame shaped bulb in candles. They are thinner and therefore have more space between the bulb and the plastic. Also with a standard bulb the widest part of the bulb extends into the thinner part of the flame. With a flame shaped bulb the thinner part of the bulb will extend into the thinner part of the flame.

TED

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Also i bought a 23 inch and a 16 inch snowmen with no cords and was wondering where to get them and is the size of the bulb different for different size blow molds.

There are basically 2 types of light kits for blowmolds. There is the C7 cordset for smaller 'molds and medium base kit for larger 'molds. (A "medium" size base is the size of "standard" household bulbs.) Both of your snowmen should take the C7 cordset. If the hole for the light is about 1 inch in diameter then that will pretty much confirm that the C7 kit is the one you need. The actual outdoor type cords for these are hard to find. You can use the cords that are made for the little ceramic houses. These are pretty easy to find. They aren't technically made for outdoor use (and most have a switch in the line) but most of the 'molders use them. I can't remember anyone reporting problems although there is potential for water to freeze inside the switch.

TED

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I use those 40 watt energy saver bulbs that only use 10 watts of power. Nice and bright and can run more molds on one circut.

That's what mine are but they use only 9 watts , must depend on the brand. It is a great way to save energy and use more molds. I could never have used as many molds as I did this year with regular bulbs! Tom

The "energy saver" bulbs are regular incandescent bulbs not the CFL type.

TED

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What are CFL bulbs? The ones I use are the curly q style of bulb. They are only about inch maybe inch and a half long. Very small bulbs.

I believe that CFL means Compact Fluorescent. These are the ones that have a glass tube in a spiral shape with kind of a bulky plastic base. (In other words "curly que" like you said.) I guess that means I was mistaken in my previous post. However, I'm pretty sure I have seen some regular incandescent bulbs that have "Energy Saver" on the package.

TED

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  • 3 years later...

I have a 31" snowman and I use a standard 25 watt bulb in him.  I have a 42" Santa which I used a 25 watt bulb in him for years.  I realized that I could use a 40 watt bulb in him since his size was bigger.  Although 60 is the maximum, I don't use it because it might melt the plastic.  That's why I use 40 watt bulb in Santa now.  I found a 42" TPI snowman.  I use a 40 watt bulb in him.  Does it make sense to put 25 watt bulb in smaller blow molds and 40 watt bulb in bigger blow molds?

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I am using CFLs for the first time this year in my blow molds as (at least according to the package) the now work down to 5 degrees.  However if you choose to use CFLs or LEDs you may have to cut or grind down the light socket to accept the bulb.

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I have a 31" snowman and I use a standard 25 watt bulb in him.  I have a 42" Santa which I used a 25 watt bulb in him for years.  I realized that I could use a 40 watt bulb in him since his size was bigger.  Although 60 is the maximum, I don't use it because it might melt the plastic.  That's why I use 40 watt bulb in Santa now.  I found a 42" TPI snowman.  I use a 40 watt bulb in him.  Does it make sense to put 25 watt bulb in smaller blow molds and 40 watt bulb in bigger blow molds?

 

Yes it makes good sense!  It also makes sense to use a lower wattage bulb in a light colored 'mold (like a snowman) and a higher wattage bulb in a darker 'mold.  It's nice to have a selection of bulbs on hand so that once you get set up you can swap to a higher or lower wattage bulb if a particular 'mold is noticeably brighter or darker than the rest.  Also, a clear bulb will light up brighter than a frosted or "soft white" bulb.

 

BTW, you have revived a thread that started back in 2010!  I was reading the posts (before I noticed the date) and thinking about what I might say in reply to some of the messages and then I saw that I had already said it!

 

TED

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I am using CFLs for the first time this year in my blow molds as (at least according to the package) the now work down to 5 degrees.  However if you choose to use CFLs or LEDs you may have to cut or grind down the light socket to accept the bulb.

 

They may work in those temperatures but I bet you will have to wait quite a while for them get to full brightness.  Do you know that the CFL bulbs are pretty much an environmental nightmare?  They have mercury in them.  When the garbage truck smashes them and they they are dumped in the landfill that mercury will leak into the ground water.  It only takes a few drops of mercury to contaminate many many gallons of water.  The fact that they are pushed as good for the environment (due to using less power) is totally absurd.

 

TED

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It is because of the mercury that Lowes, Home Depot, etc. have the drop off recycle boxes for the CFL bulbs, but probably the majority of people will not take the time to drop the bulbs off there and just throw them in the garbage.

 

They promote the CFL bulbs as being an energy saver and money saver because the bulbs last for many years and you don't have to replace them.  I have found the longevity of a lot of the bulbs to be a fallacy, through the few years we have used them we have had many of them burn out within two years and some within a year which means replacing them more often then incandescent bulbs and more trips to the drop off box to dispose of them.

 

Mel

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I live in Chicago and have used the CFL's in below zero weather, they achieve full brightness in about 2 minutes.

I get a three pack at Menards for 89 cents and I use them in all the large molds, this will be season four with them, and I don't believe I have had to replace any yet. The energy savings are huge.

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