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edge

how to wrap 10,000 lights in large trees

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I understand the rule of three, however, how do you warp very large trees that are over 50 feet tall and very wide with thousands of lights? Extension cords at various places? Please help! I thank you in advance for your assistance. Peace

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I have one tree with 7,500 lights and I plug all the lights into cube taps at the base of the tree. I am not wrapping the limbs. If I were, I would still probably plug all into cube taps at the base of the tree; running zip cord to each set of 3 higher on the tree.

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We run zips up the tree with cube taps at the base. Another option would be to prune the tree very well each spring.

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Edge, I used a bucket truck to do my 80 foot Maple. I started at the height I wanted to go, about 35 feet (not all the way up to 80 feet) and started wrapping. I used the rule of three on the first wraps and then started stacking the plugs after that. I kept track of the amps on each run so as not to max out any one channel. When I hit that point, I started a new run until out of each color (I used 3 colors this year).

I preferred to work from the top down, getting the harder part out of the way (and to get the bucket truck out of here) When you stack the plugs, you bypass the fuses in the lights.

Good luck, doing these big thick trees is worth it..go for it. :D

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OK, so I have to ask, "What is the rule of three"?

Does anyone have an instructional video of how to wrap a tree like a pro?

Thanks!

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"What is the rule of three"?

the rule of three is not to connect more than 3 strands consecutively. This is derived from the manufacturer's recommendations and the amp rating of the fuse in the strand's plug.

However, if you do good shopping, you can find strands that will allow you to string 8 together. I find mine at target. You might pay more than at Wallyworld, but you can get 8 and are not limited to 3.

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OK, so I have to ask, "What is the rule of three"?
The rule of 3 is only connecting 3 strands of 100ct minis end to end (like the green plugs below). Stacking is connecting strands of light together on the same end (e.g. the male plug has a female plug on the same housing - see the white plugs below).

p_12758582.jpg

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Target brand says you can connect 8 strands end to end, so buying that brand is an option. Just make sure you mark them so you know which strands are that brand the next year when you take the lights out of storage. Most lights say you can only connect 3 strands end to end.

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I am going to tray an experiment this summer with snow fence. I'm going to make strips that go around the trunk of the tree so I only have to tie wrap them on instead of wrap and wrap and wrap and wrap them on and then unwrap and unwrap and unwrap and unwrap them off again.

Right now I do red green and white on the trunk up about 12'. The goal will be to install the lights on these strips so that I can pull off any one color at a time for replacement not all of them. I should be able to do this with a few thousand wireties and a few cold beers this summer..:)

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I am going to tray an experiment this summer with snow fence. I'm going to make strips that go around the trunk of the tree so I only have to tie wrap them on instead of wrap and wrap and wrap and wrap them on and then unwrap and unwrap and unwrap and unwrap them off again.

Right now I do red green and white on the trunk up about 12'. The goal will be to install the lights on these strips so that I can pull off any one color at a time for replacement not all of them. I should be able to do this with a few thousand wireties and a few cold beers this summer..:)

Do you think chicken wire would work a similar manner?

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Do you think chicken wire would work a similar manner?

Absolutely! I'm using the snow fence because it's plastic, doesn't conduct(might save some GFI issues), and I have about 70' :P

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Absolutely! I'm using the snow fence because it's plastic, doesn't conduct(might save some GFI issues), and I have about 70' :P

DAA, this tells you how old I am, when you said snow fence the first thing I tought of was the "old style". Wooden slats held together by wire at various points.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]34318[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]34319[/ATTACH]

That is why it did not make any sense to me. Okay go ahead and get good laugh.:o:o:o

post-947-129571220527_thumb.jpg

post-947-129571220827_thumb.jpg

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The snow fence I have is green with 1" sq holes. They also make it in orange like you pictured, and black. It's easy to work with and should hold lights real well!

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Use LEDs and you don't have to worry about the rule of three or stacking. I used a bucket truck and started at the top.

10,000 LED's (F/W that actually work): $1,200 per tree

10,000 Incans: $60 to $120 per tree

I personally think it's easier to deal with running a few SPT2 extensions.

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The rule of 3 is only connecting 3 strands of 100ct minis end to end (like the green plugs below). Stacking is connecting strands of light together on the same end (e.g. the male plug has a female plug on the same housing - see the white plugs below).

p_12758582.jpg

So is stacking okay? Can you do unlimited (within reason) stacks?

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I am going to tray an experiment this summer with snow fence. I'm going to make strips that go around the trunk of the tree so I only have to tie wrap them on instead of wrap and wrap and wrap and wrap them on and then unwrap and unwrap and unwrap and unwrap them off again.

Right now I do red green and white on the trunk up about 12'. The goal will be to install the lights on these strips so that I can pull off any one color at a time for replacement not all of them. I should be able to do this with a few thousand wireties and a few cold beers this summer..:)

Gary I have been doing a similier thing for several years. I use (2) 1x2 boards 8', 10', or 12' long. For original first time wrap I tie boards in place at back side of tree. I use 4" to 6" spacing between the boards and use bungee cords to hold in place after I finish wrapping. I mark the boards vertically every 4" or 6" depending on how tight I want the wrap. I start wrapping by stapling to one board. I wrap and staple on other board 1 or 2 marks up depending spiral I want. I then go directly above this mark and cord runs vertical for 4" or 6" and I staple in place at that mark. I then do wrap around tree and repeat process on other board. I do this to the top of board. I repeat the process with my other 2 colors. I then mark eack board as it is custom fit to each tree as trunk sizes vary. It takes a little while to do original wrap but it pays dividents at next years set up. I can wrap a 12' tree in less then 5'. When I take down I roll on one of the boards and tie up for storage. Works well for me.

Bill

PS I also cut up old tire innertube into small squares and place over cord where I use staple and this stops chaffing of electrical cord from the staple. I use 2 stainless steel cable staples at each connection point. However this year I have ordered 2'x 6' LED trunk wraps in 3 colors from Travis. I will mount the 3 colors one on top of the other and tie wrap together and use bungee cord every 12" to tie around tree. I am making my own hooks as I am cheap! I found 200' of 1/4" marine bungee cord on EBAY for $27.99 + ft.

Edited by bill vanderslice
added PS

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I am going to tray an experiment this summer with snow fence. I'm going to make strips that go around the trunk of the tree so I only have to tie wrap them on instead of wrap and wrap and wrap and wrap them on and then unwrap and unwrap and unwrap and unwrap them off again.

Right now I do red green and white on the trunk up about 12'. The goal will be to install the lights on these strips so that I can pull off any one color at a time for replacement not all of them. I should be able to do this with a few thousand wireties and a few cold beers this summer..:)

Gary

Pls keep us advised on how this comes along! I think it is a great idea and I know you will make it work. I'm curious on how you will mount strings that you can remove 1 set without distubing the other sets. My luck always had back string fail and it is a problem removing the back string or the first string you put on. I never seemed to have top string fail- Murphys Law!!

Bill

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Guest Lightzilla

I understand the rule of three

I am glad I do not use mini lights any more because that "rule of three" sucked at times. Leds sure help in the area, well at least the ones we sale here in Canada. 1 - 70 count string is 4.8 watts, but it is recommemned that we do not go over 480 watts (CSA Approved) of Max connection.

Here is a vendor (not on Pc) that tells how many strings can be hooked together of what they sale.

" Residential Sets - these sets have standard plugs and are divided into sets with 35 LEDs and 70 LEDs for our mini LED lights (M5, C6, G12 sets). Our larger lens shapes come in 25 LEDs per set. Residential sets can be connected up to 210 watts per run - for 35 LED's per set, that translates to roughly 80 sets and for 70 LEDs it means 40 sets (we always round down for safety when it comes to numbers like connectivity.)

" Commercial Sets - these sets have proprietary coax connectors and can be run up to 125 sets in series...........and so on"

Edited by Lightzilla

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