Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Guest scotty

blow mold storage

Recommended Posts

You know, just outback on the patio with a tarp thats forever old thats on a couple 2x2 about 5 feet high. Its a box of sorts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wipe down the molds after use. Then each one gets slipped into an appropriate sized garbage bag before storage to keep them dust free and help protect from scratches. I bought a large box of drum liners from Sam's Club which holds most of the large (tall and /or wide) molds . A roll of twist ties gets cut to appropriate sizes and ties the bags shut. They get packed as tight as possible in my garage loft with most of them standing upright.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

blowmoldman, Before I store my blow molds away, I use wet wipes to wipe them down after use. I use plastic tote storage containers for some of my small and large blow molds. I otherwise use plastic dry cleaning bags from the cleaners to keep them dust free and from any scratches. I just put a loose knot on top of the bag to close it. The blow molds then get put in a local utility building rented from the city and the rest I keep at home in my small garage. All are set up in an upright position. I never recommend storing each blow mold on top of each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 12X20 metal building that I store my supplies for my blow mold displays and additional parts need for them.

I then built a steel building with concrete floor. It is 36' by 48' (You could have parked 5 or 6 cars in it or more) This building has racks that the molds are placed on so you can see them if need be. They are never stacked on each other. The areas in the building have their own type of molds together. (Christmas,Halloween,Easter,other) Every shelf has a written inventory. All choir, angels, Santas, Elfs, Bunny, pumpkin, ghost and so on are placed together. It has to be done like that to keep up with all of them due to the volume/number of molds (YES..there is a TON of them..LOL-LOL)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I otherwise use plastic dry cleaning bags from the cleaners to keep them dust free and from any scratches. I just put a loose knot on top of the bag to close it.

What is your source for the dry cleaning bags? I've been looking for large clear plastic bags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 12X20 metal building that I store my supplies for my blow mold displays and additional parts need for them.

I then built a steel building with concrete floor. It is 36' by 48' (You could have parked 5 or 6 cars in it or more) This building has racks that the molds are placed on so you can see them if need be. They are never stacked on each other. The areas in the building have their own type of molds together. (Christmas,Halloween,Easter,other) Every shelf has a written inventory. All choir, angels, Santas, Elfs, Bunny, pumpkin, ghost and so on are placed together. It has to be done like that to keep up with all of them due to the volume/number of molds (YES..there is a TON of them..LOL-LOL)

I like this!! You have the IDEAL Storage situation!! I hope to one day be able to build something like this. I have always joked with my family and friends that instead of going with out back storage buildings (Which I have 2 of) That instead I should have just built a big warehouse type building!! :)

I store my molds off site in a storage area that is well protected from the elements!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest A.F.NUT

After mine come down from a display they are washed inside and out dryed and then put into a clear bag, everything I own is bagged, this really helps the paint and saves me from worrying about paint damage. I have shelves built in the basement and one room partitioned off for storage, each holiday is in it's own zone. The shelves are built high enough so the large carolers stand under with just an inch or so to spare. Anything with an original box goes back into and these have their own shelf. I recently stacked the newer Christmas molds on one of the shelves this year, so far it seems fine, don't like to do that but space is running out. Taking your time and neatly organizing your storage is so important, and helps make more space and makes the display next time go so much easier!

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Judd_Peiffer

let me tell you what Tom's storage is the ideal way! i built shelves like he has and it's stored everything the molds without boxes get bagged and go on and below the shelves the one's with original boxes only go on top or on the extra pallets i have setting in my storage are!

Justin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have several storage solutions. Currently I have a large 1300 s.f. lofted storage space that is off site. All of my Halloween molds, sale molds, and molds I need to work on are there as well as workshop space. The bulk of my molds are stored in a one and half car garage which also has a loft, a steel storage shed as well as a barn shed. The barn uses shelves and is basically two floors with movable panels. Molds are stacked pretty much like cord wood, but done carefully. There are too many for me to store in bags and I don't have the time to do it.

post-95-12957121783_thumb.jpg

post-95-129571217848_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is your source for the dry cleaning bags? I've been looking for large clear plastic bags.

I get my bags at a local dry cleaning store. I know the manager and can get them for FREE. FREE is good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Due to the fact Ottawa Canada only has the potential for very hot weather (over 75 degrees F) for about a 12 week period. I store mine in the attic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest A.F.NUT

Home Depot sells the 55 gallon clear drum liners at $16.99 for a box of 60 the size is perfect and the price isn't too bad and they always have them. I have already bought my second box of them thgis year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carrie,

OMG...you obviously have a "ton" or two, or maybe three of blow molds there! Ha, ha ... yeah I read the thread about "how many blow molds to the ton." I like your pics - very impressive! If you can get to it, I would like to buy the blue trumpet angel that's in the 1st picture. That's right...the one that's on the very bottom.

LOL - just kiddin.'

I'm just starting out and so far have my molds in cardboard boxes (that they were shipped in) in the attic. But, I'll have to come up with something better because the boxes take up too much room. I like the idea of the plastic bags and will have to give it a try.

I have to ask...will storing them in plastic in a "hot Houston Texas attic" be bad for the molds in any way? We get some pretty long and hot summers here. Let me know your thoughts.

Thanks!

Rita

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carrie,

OMG...you obviously have a "ton" or two, or maybe three of blow molds there! Ha, ha ... yeah I read the thread about "how many blow molds to the ton." I like your pics - very impressive! If you can get to it, I would like to buy the blue trumpet angel that's in the 1st picture. That's right...the one that's on the very bottom.

LOL - just kiddin.'

I'm just starting out and so far have my molds in cardboard boxes (that they were shipped in) in the attic. But, I'll have to come up with something better because the boxes take up too much room. I like the idea of the plastic bags and will have to give it a try.

I have to ask...will storing them in plastic in a "hot Houston Texas attic" be bad for the molds in any way? We get some pretty long and hot summers here. Let me know your thoughts.

Thanks!

Rita

Rita, heat doesn't generally hurt blow molds especially if you have some ventilation up there. The molds should be just fine. I know a lot of people down south that store them as you do and have never heard of any harm coming to them. The sun's UV rays though, that's what you need to watch out for. It wouldn't take long for your molds to become brittle and start breaking if left out in the Texas sun too long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rita, heat doesn't generally hurt blow molds especially if you have some ventilation up there. The molds should be just fine. I know a lot of people down south that store them as you do and have never heard of any harm coming to them. The sun's UV rays though, that's what you need to watch out for. It wouldn't take long for your molds to become brittle and start breaking if left out in the Texas sun too long.

Thanks Carrie - that's what I was thinking, but I wanted to find out for sure. You're right...the Texas sun can be very brutal in summer but I guess my molds won't be on display then so I should be OK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Carrie - that's what I was thinking, but I wanted to find out for sure. You're right...the Texas sun can be very brutal in summer but I guess my molds won't be on display then so I should be OK.

Rita, I'm not too familiar with Houston, but I know down in SA (where our family is) pretty warm during the winter too. So they use the shade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 sets of steel shelves invading my lawn mower/ tool storage area, many shelves and all the floor space in a 16x24 building. And a 16x12 room in my house. SOON will come a new metal building with concrete floor, not just for molds but .. i have a plan lol : )

Oh and hey lets post some pictures!! I'm building one more shelve this weekend and will post storage pics soon!

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carrie,

OMG...you obviously have a "ton" or two, or maybe three of blow molds there! Ha, ha ... yeah I read the thread about "how many blow molds to the ton." I like your pics - very impressive! If you can get to it, I would like to buy the blue trumpet angel that's in the 1st picture. That's right...the one that's on the very bottom.

LOL - just kiddin.'

I'm just starting out and so far have my molds in cardboard boxes (that they were shipped in) in the attic. But, I'll have to come up with something better because the boxes take up too much room. I like the idea of the plastic bags and will have to give it a try.

I have to ask...will storing them in plastic in a "hot Houston Texas attic" be bad for the molds in any way? We get some pretty long and hot summers here. Let me know your thoughts.

Thanks!

Rita

Great question. My dad is worried if I put them in plastic bags and they sit in the shed would the heat from the shed melt the bag onto the mold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...