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XmasBoy

How do neighbors accept halloween shows?

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The other day, my dad was working with me on some soldering on my second Light-O-Rama controller. He was telling me that I should do a Halloween display of some sort with the Light-O-Rama. My mom overheard us and said it would drive our neighbors insane.

I have been animated for 3 years on a Lights and Sounds of Christmas unit and I haven't had a single complaint that my family or I have hears about. I have always done a small halloween display, but nothing major. How do most neighbors usually take animated, large-scale halloween displays? I don't want to push things with my neighbors too far, and I would like to make sure that my relationship with the HOA stays good, but I don't want to not do anything for halloween out of fear that someone might complain that this is going too far.

I will at least do something animated on halloween for trick-or-treaters as a test run so I can get a better feel for how Light-O-Rama operates, but have other people had experiences with their neighbors where halloween animated displays "pushed it too far?"

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I've done a BIG Halloween display all four years at our current house.

I have several elements that I don't put out until Halloween day and the only animation that runs before the 31st is the pumpkin choir.

I've gotten very positice responses from the display every years

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I only run a display from the Saturday before Halloween up to Halloween. I feel that by not overdoing it, it keeps good will. I never do more than 16 channels.

If you are concerned about how it will go over, keep it small and resist the temptation to run it from the end of September to November. (my $0.02 worth)

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I've always done a Halloween display & last year was the the first year using LOR. Although I was just learning and I only used a couple controllers it was a big hit. The neighbors loved the concept and Halloween night I got rave reviews. The only issue is Day Light Savings time has been pushed back, So, by the time it gets dark enough for the display to look it's best, 90% of the Trick-or-Treaters have gone.

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My neighbors love the Halloween show that I do. I start setup early in the month but I only "Fire it up" for testing and then Halloween night. I disappoint a few visitors when they can't make it that night, but it keeps the neighbors happy and actually excited for the next year and Christmas.

The firs couple of years I used it as a warm up for Christmas. Now It's kind of taking on a life of it's own....

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I have done a Halloween show for 2 years. I usually start it about 2 weeks before Halloween whenever I see the neighbors have their decorations set out. I usually shut it off at 9:00 so kids won't be kept awake on schooldays. It will be a big hit on trick or treat night. Don't be suprised if some kids will sit down and watch the show and forget about getting candy for awhile.

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I've done a small Halloween show for 3 years now. A pumpkin inflatable, some orange rope light, strobes and lighted skulls on stakes.

I play music and run an LOR sequence that is not related to the music. People love it. The neighbors don't mind at all. It takes the pressure off of them.

btw, we get a LOT of visitors - 300 if the weather is bad, 750 is our record for. (we count by giving out Vampire teeth)

People generally walk through our neighborhood after parking nearby.

JonB

Edited by JonB256
vampire teeth!

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I've been doing Halloween for a long time, started using LOR to control it a few years ago. My neighbors love it, the TOTs love it, its well worth doing and its fun!

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Have you tried asking the neighbors?

I haven't, but there are several reasons why that wouldn't really work in my case. My neighborhood has a road in a circle. The houses are on the outer end of the road and there is a pond inside the road. There are about 20 houses that this would affect, and I don't really want to go asking 20 people. The other reason is that even if it did bother them, I can't really see them telling me that, and I don't want everyone in my neighborhood mad at me and I don't even know about it.

I'll probably just take sme of the advice posted here and just run it for 2 weekends at the most, maybe just halloween weekend.

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just ease into it... you dont have to chase people with a chainsaw the first year. i have taken a few years off from the house to own/run a haunted house in town. last year we had over 10,000 sqft....hmmm wonder how the neighbors (& HOA) would like that one? in over 10+ years at the house i had only one real complaint, one year a neighbor sent me an anonymous letter stating why halloween was evil and antichristain. i guess they never noticed the 12,000 christmas lights that started going up when halloween came down. all neighbors around me miss the halloween set up though.

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I'm not sure; what did they say about your Memorial Day display? Your St. Patrick's Day display? Valentine's Day display? Groundhog day?

If no comments, ask them when they come see your Independence Day display.

Seriously, keep it "Disney scary" or less, you should be OK. I'm still upset with the neighbor that went chasing all the trick-or-treaters with a mask and running chainsaw (sans chain) - that was "adult scary" We've gone from several hundred kids before that to just a few dozen, and that was 5 years ago.

I did a small animated display last year, primarily just a pumpkin choir. I had computer issues, but when it was working, the audience liked it. Daylights savings time did get in the way, though, of it showing up good.

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