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Strictly Lights

200 amp service

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Ok I was reading somewhere on here about a 200 amp service and it wa said that you can draw 400 amps off of it in 110v. No that is so wrong. Good thinking but not correct. Im not trying to be a jerk but nothing good will come out of that. I called my uncle that is an engineer for square D power systems. He said yes you can pull 200 amps off one line going into the box. However if you connect anything else to the other line you are going to blow the 200 amp main breaker. If the main for somereason does not blow, you are a a huge risk of burning the nutral wire off inside the box. Just thought I would throw that out there. I would hate to see someone burn their house down.

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Talk to your uncle again. The two sides of the panel are out of phase with each other. If you pull 50 amps from one side and 50 amps from the other side, you actually will have ZERO on the neutral. That is why they wire homes that way in the first place. Your home service comes from a SINGLE phase of the 3-phase power that supplies your neighborhood. That single phase power feeds a step-down transformer (on a pole or on the ground) that has a single primary but two secondaries with a common center tap (the neutral). You get 110V from one side (phase A) and 110V from the other side (phase B). Seriously.

You will get 400amps of 110VAC from 200amp 222VAC service. Keeping Phase A and Phase B balanced makes it even better. Seriously.

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Ok, if it makes you feel safer, I will 2nd the explanation that if you have equal loads to both hot leads. You will have zero that is nada current on the neutral lead. If you draw 200 amps from only the one hot lead, you will have 200 amps going through your neutral lead back to the transformer.

So, if you do not run a electric clothes dryer or hot water heater. And it is winter and you do not have a electric furnace or heat pump. Or you do not run any other 220VAC device. In essence you could have up to 400 amps worth of 110VAC load and your 200 amp rated breaker panel will be fine.

You must have not explained to your uncle or he did not hear you correctly. Cause his answer is incorrect.

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I use LEDs. I plug everything into one outlet and don't worry about it.
I wonder what 400 amps of LED's would look like on a house, or you could even look directly at it.:cool:

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I wonder what 400 amps of LED's would look like on a house, or you could even look directly at it.:cool:

I don't think even Paul Sessel has enough LEDs to suck up 400 amps.

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Heh. ;)

I use LEDs. I plug everything into one outlet and don't worry about it.

I use several outlets, to get a nice, balanced load, from both phases of my 200 amp main panel...

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I have a seperate power service just for my lights. Its a old farm house so there is 200 amps to the house and 200 amps to the barn. The 200 in the barn does not get used in the winter.

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Better you than me. Dang it I feel my pucker tighting up just looking at your amp meters. You whole block's lights must dim with your show running. And your local power company must put on a few more generators while muttering something about that crazy guy on grid Tangle Foxtrot sucking all of the juice out of the wires. LOL

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Better you than me. Dang it I feel my pucker tighting up just looking at your amp meters. You whole block's lights must dim with your show running. And your local power company must put on a few more generators while muttering something about that crazy guy on grid Tangle Foxtrot sucking all of the juice out of the wires. LOL

That was with "all on", the meter was spinning at 80 rpm :eek:.

Your pucker factor would have increased a bit when I did a test to see if turning the lights, on/off/on/off/on/off, would use more or less power. I wrote a 2 minute sequence, with all lights on for 3 seconds /off for 3 seconds, so there was actually 60 seconds of on time...

The end result was 88 rpm on the meter, with very erratic movements...:D

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I wonder what 400 amps of LED's would look like on a house, or you could even look directly at it.:cool:

Can you say SUNBURN

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That was with "all on", the meter was spinning at 80 rpm :eek:.

Your pucker factor would have increased a bit when I did a test to see if turning the lights, on/off/on/off/on/off, would use more or less power. I wrote a 2 minute sequence, with all lights on for 3 seconds /off for 3 seconds, so there was actually 60 seconds of on time...

The end result was 88 rpm on the meter, with very erratic movements...:D

I'm not buying it.

inrush_current.gif

I'm just saying

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Im just trying to be safe. I do not want to burn my house down.

Yes, be careful. If you don't have a working knowledge and respect for electricity, I would suggest working directly with someone that does, or better yet hire an electrician. I know they can be expensive.

I work for Southern California Edison, this is a sign we have on our 2 Megawatt Generator for those people that don't understand how dangerious electricity is.

post-4945-129571228644_thumb.jpg

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I wonder what 400 amps of LED's would look like on a house, or you could even look directly at it.:cool:

I'm pretty shure it would put Clark Griswald to shame!!!!

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Guess I am really lost now. Its my understanding that if the main is 200 amps that both sides added together can not exceed 200 amps. The pictures above show me different.

Jeff

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Guess I am really lost now.

It's very simple. Your house is wired to a 240 volt center tap transformer. The center tap is the neutral connection throughout your house. Each side of the transformer is 120 volts and is connecte to each side of your breaker box. If you have a 200 amp service, it's at 240 volts. At 120, because of ohms law, it's 400 amps. Keep it balanced though, because the center tap wire is still only able to carry 200 amps.

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Do you have a number I can call you at ERNIE? I am working with permits now on power in the town to get mine hooked up. Just got word they are allowing me a 200 amp service but dummie like me has questions what I have read on here and dont undertstand it just yet. Have meter ready to test .. LOL

Jeff

Edited by Jeff Messer

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It's very simple. Your house is wired to a 240 volt center tap transformer. The center tap is the neutral connection throughout your house. Each side of the transformer is 120 volts and is connecte to each side of your breaker box. If you have a 200 amp service, it's at 240 volts. At 120, because of ohms law, it's 400 amps. Keep it balanced though, because the center tap wire is still only able to carry 200 amps.

Ernie:

Thanks so much for giving me a call and helping me understand this. It does give me that warm fuzzy feeling now... The Show must go on !!!

Jeff

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