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welder--old question I am sure


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question for the folks making wireframes, that I know probably has been asked before:

1- what type of welder do you use? stick, mig, etc

2- does your welder run on 110 or 220?

3- do you do much welding besides wireframes?

reason for asking is that I was thinking of this welder, but was wondering if I would regret not going with a welder powdered by 220 later on.

thanks

bert-nc

http://www.lowes.com/pd_256722-1703-K2480-1_0_?productId=1072945&Ntt=welder&Ntk=i_products&pl=1&currentURL=/pl__0__s?newSearch=true$Ntt=welder$y=10$x=21

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i think that would be good for what your are going to be doing. i have a lincoln mig welder that is a bit bigger then that one. now i don't weld wire frames (metal work on cars and such) but that should be fine. i would not go with a 220 welder 'cause then you have to get special wiring and outlets and all to run it; this on you can plug in anywhere. i would suggest getting a speed shield/auto darkening helmet that attaches to your head (speed shields/auto darkening change from light to dark when you start welding and then back to light when not; give you the ability to see what you are doing while the shield is down and not welding)

Edited by ratroder
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Ratroder has it correct for you. The Lincoln 140 and 140HD are great home units. You really don't want to go 220V unless you need the heavy duty ability. Also - going 220V will limit your "activity area" since you are now limited by the length of your cables from the 220V plug. The 110V you can use anywhere, including out in the middle of the driveway. As he mentions - spend the $30 on a real face shield. The cheapy it comes with has to be hand held - so you lose one hand for holding other things. With a full face auto-darkening shield, you can free yourself up to do much more. I have both a stick welder and a 140HD (exact same as the 140 you listed above- just more extras in the box). The stick welder is easy to use, but the 140 MIG ability is even easier. The stick welder is also a little messier (more spatter). Plus, you might want to eventually do more with the welder. Bigger projects, etc. A month ago, I welded a custom exhaust for the car with the 140HD using its MIG capabilities. I could have never done this with my stick welder. Dont get me wrong - stick welding does not mean small - oil pipelines even use stick welding - it is just more than my little stick welder/typical "home hobby" stick welder can do.

I am sure you will get more reponses here - some good welders here.

In the meantime - try http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/

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I have that same Lincoln 140 welder. It works great for the wireframe welding that I got it for.

I agree with all the previous posts. Get a real shield/auto darkening helmet and you don't need the 220 unless you are going to do some other heavy duty welding.

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1- what type of welder do you use? stick, MIG, etc I would recommend a MIG welder. MIG welders are the easiest to learn how to use and get great results!

2- does your welder run on 110 or 220? Welders are sold by current capacity and input supply voltage. There are a few 110 welders out there made by different manufacturers. There are a lot more 220 welders to choose from. Personally I own a 110v Miller 135. It works for 96% of the stuff I do at home. If you are doing welding of materials over 1/4 or if you need a high duty cycle (really long welds) then I would suggest a higher amperage welder. The higher amperage welders are generally only available in 220 voltage. One thing that I have seen first hand and have also heard from others, You definitely get what you pay for when buying a welder! Don't skimp or you'll pay in the long run. There are lots of second rate welders out there.

You'll be safe if you buy a name brand Here are the top three I would suggest, Miller, Lincoln, Hobart. At work I deal with many exhaust manufacturing companies that do welding as a main part of their business. Most of them use Miller and have for at least the last 20 years. That's why I bought a Miller and I'm glad I did.

BTW: The thing I like best about my welder is it's 110v I can take it anywhere and plug it in! If your friend need something fixed, say a garage door, it's really nice to take your tools to the repair site instead of the other way around.

3- do you do much welding besides wire frames? After I bought my welder about 17 years ago I started to weld almost steel projects in one way or another. I have built 2 dune buggies, lots of "projects",trailers, trellises, brackets, exhausts systems,and repairs of ton's of stuff............If I have anything bigger than my welder can handle I will normally tack weld the pieces together, to keep alignment, then take it to work where we have a Miller 185, that I also bought.

Someday when I start making some real $$ I'm going to buy a TIG welder. So I can weld chromoly steels as well as aluminum. Then I can start making some really cool stuff!

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So Gary,

A car frame is around 1/4" steel. So with the welder you are suggesting, I could weld it together if I absolutely had to? Not that I have any cars laying around with broken frames, but just to get an idea of what the Miller 135 can do. It's something I have always wanted, for a myriad of projects, not just wire frames...

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So Gary,

A car frame is around 1/4" steel. So with the welder you are suggesting, I could weld it together if I absolutely had to? Not that I have any cars laying around with broken frames, but just to get an idea of what the Miller 135 can do. It's something I have always wanted, for a myriad of projects, not just wire frames...

Look Ed, I know that you really liked the movie but I've already told you that you can't make a metal suit and be Ironman!!!

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So Gary,

A car frame is around 1/4" steel. So with the welder you are suggesting, I could weld it together if I absolutely had to? Not that I have any cars laying around with broken frames, but just to get an idea of what the Miller 135 can do. It's something I have always wanted, for a myriad of projects, not just wire frames...

Ed,

1/4 car frame would be at the extreme limits of the 135's ability. If I were to weld it I'd make sure the steel was perfectly clean and I'd grind the edges so they were chamfered. Then I'd lay down the best weld you can possibly do makeing sure to get total penetration with the heat. With a car frame Id'd also add in some strenghtener plates after grinding the welds back flat again. If you are trying to fix an old nasty, rusty, frame then a bigger welder would be suggested, just to burn through the rust. You'd still need to get it pretty clean though to have a good weld.

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Everytime I hear this welder talk, I get a little giddy...

It appears that Miller isn't making the 135 anymore (I do see it in stores though). It's the 140 now. But here is my next question: would it be worth paying and extra $350 and getting a dual voltage welder. It doesn't appear to be better at welding using 120, but it does have the capability of welding thicker steel, assuming a 220 outlet is available. You get both portability and power. Know that I have never welded before but if I got one, I have no real idea what I would do with it other that there has been small stuff and bigger stuff I wanted to weld (but not car frames)...

http://www.millerwelds.com/products/mig/millermatic_211_autoset/

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Ed,

In my experince as Gary pointed out, the key to any good weld is clean metal and getting it to melt. The short fall of any welder is can it pentrate the metal to the proper temp to "weld" or fuse the metal together. If I feel the metal is thicker than the capabilities of my welder, I wil tack weld the peices together, fire up my torches and get the metal glowing hot. Then apply my bead of weld to the hot spot. works everytime.

Andy

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A dual voltage welder probably just has a multi tap transformer in it. This allows the different voltages to be hooked up with the different plug adapters.

When a device that is made for dual voltage it would normally draw twice the current. So there must be some type of current limiting going on when hooked to 110.

If this one was available back when I bought mine I probably would have bought it...

BTW: That price listed doesn't cover the shielding gas tank, gloves, jacket, or mask. It'll cost you another $1-400+.

Edited by Toymakr000
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All you need is a Miller 140 or a Lincoln 140 If you got the extra money get gas mix 75/25 most welders that size comes with the regulator,hose.If you use the gas you will learn to weld quicker fluxcore wire is tricky,messy. Plus it will save time on chiping off the slag. for painting the size wire you will need for welding wire frames I use .23 or .24 a roll last a long time on wireframes don't forget to buy a pack of tips the size of the wire your gonna use I would recomend buying some anti-spatter spray to save on tips and your nozzel. Don't buy nozzel dip it will clog up your cable in time.All of my mig guns has lub pads on the wire at the roll on the inside welder. The pads cleans and lubs the wire for the cable running to the gun. They are really cheap worth the money.Adjusting the regulator for the gas mix before you turn the gas on turn the t handle out tell it turns real easy stop stand to the side then turn the gas bottle on slow after you get it turned on slowly turn the t handle to the right you will see the needle come up. Turn the wire speed all the way down .I lick my lips when i can feel the gas blowing on my lips for sec or 2 It will be adjusted for no wind. this tec will save money most people adjust the gas so they can hear it they are wasting money on gas. DO not breath the gas. one more tip make sure the rollers on the machine fits the wire size.If you call around and get 2 welding shops going against each other on the price of the machine they will come down.I saved around 7,000 doing just that.Miller and Lincoln comes with a 3 year warenty.Welding shops will help you get all setup on what you will need Lowes don't.I'm not putting lowes down welding isn't what they do.If you ever have a problem with your machine Lowes will want you to mail it to the factory.A welding shop has train people to fix it. That means alot.When you weld like I do.If my machine is down my money stops.

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