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dmoore

RGB 3D CoroFlakes

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David you're killing me with all the stuff you keep coming up with for those 5050 Modules. You definately need to sell these as well! Those look awesome.

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Very nice job Dave! Are you going to be marketing this?

Greg

I don't have any plans to sell these items in 2010 as there are very few people doing full RGB displays this year. If it looks like more people will adopt RGB for 2011 displays, I may add these types of 3D coro items to items I sell.

What I've found with RGB, since the "per LED" cost is a bit higher than traditional LED strings, is that you need to be more efficient with the LEDs that you are using. By using coro to diffuse the light it allows you several advantages:

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I don't have any plans to sell these items in 2010 as there are very few people doing full RGB displays this year. If it looks like more people will adopt RGB for 2011 displays, I may add these types of 3D coro items to items I sell.

What I've found with RGB, since the "per LED" cost is a bit higher than traditional LED strings, is that you need to be more efficient with the LEDs that you are using. By using coro to diffuse the light it allows you several advantages:

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Just thinking that would look VERY swanky strapped to my chimney! ;)

Swanky indeed! I can totally see one of those hanging over my garage instead of the usual wreath.

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Very Cool!! David, I assume you used the roll of LED Strips cut into 3 LED's per segment... How much does a roll of RGB LED strip run from China??

I could see a Few of these on my roof... Maybe even in all white without the RGB... Lots of possibilities. I like the design!

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Very Cool!! David, I assume you used the roll of LED Strips cut into 3 LED's per segment... How much does a roll of RGB LED strip run from China??

I could see a Few of these on my roof... Maybe even in all white without the RGB... Lots of possibilities. I like the design!

Hey jerk, you'll see whats he is using in 3 days....LOL And no, they are 3 RGB pixel, not a roll. Roughly $1 each

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What would something like that run as a custom one-off if you don't do a full production run? I assume once you have the pattern defined, you can make more. There would just be additional time to setup the machines for a special run? Just thinking that would look VERY swanky strapped to my chimney! ;)

It's hard to say what they would cost - but yes, the design is already in the computer and cutting another one out wouldn't be a problem. Rarely is the design or cutting the time consuming part - it's all the instructions, website changes, testing, etc. The main factors are if they were pre-assembled or just a glue-it-together-yourself kit and what the shipping costs are. If I put them up I think I'd build a jig to make the 3D top - that would cut assembly time from 1:15 to :15 minutes or so (per flake). Then the purchaser would only have to attach the LED modules and glue the top to the base.

Thanks for the encouragement - glad to see someone else likes them!

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Very Cool!! David, I assume you used the roll of LED Strips cut into 3 LED's per segment... How much does a roll of RGB LED strip run from China??

I could see a Few of these on my roof... Maybe even in all white without the RGB... Lots of possibilities. I like the design!

Chris is correct - these are using the 3 x 5050 SMD LED modules. I used them because they are less work to solder since they come with leds on them, easier to glue onto the coro than the strip and are waterproof. Plus, I don't need really right coverage since the coro is diffusing the light. The modules are in the $1 range and the strip is about $50-60 for 16ft.

You can see my Coro Northstar I did that uses RGB strip here: http://forums.planetchristmas.com/showthread.php/42236-The-RGB-Coro-NorthStar

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Hi,

How did you make the white shell part of the coro flake? It looks like you attached (glued) a 2" edge to a precut (snowflake shape) piece of coro.

The design is very cool !

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Hi,

How did you make the white shell part of the coro flake? It looks like you attached (glued) a 2" edge to a precut (snowflake shape) piece of coro.

The design is very cool !

That is correct. Not much too it, just time consuming.

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Hey jerk, you'll see whats he is using in 3 days....LOL And no, they are 3 RGB pixel, not a roll. Roughly $1 each

Jerkette... I saw something similar to what he is using on some wireframes from Mark Schell at the Carolina Mini... So I think I know what he is using, but will be good to see some of the Holiday Coro items in person, as well as hear David's presentation :)

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Hu..what....Davids not coming. I'm bringing them along with a couple coro stars

Oh, well it will be good to hear you speak about them... Do you use a lot of Coro objects in your display??

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Oh, well it will be good to hear you speak about them... Do you use a lot of Coro objects in your display??

I use a few items I have built....CS are my first pieces from David.

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Excellent job there Joe!

Here is a video that also shows what you can do with pixels inside of CoroFlake:

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Excellent job there Joe!

Here is a video that also shows what you can do with pixels inside of CoroFlake:

What specifically are you using inside of the CoroFlake to do this animation. Also, how is it controlled? I can hear a clicking noise each time the animation changes. Is that the mouse and are you changing animations or is it pre-programmed with certain sequences?

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What specifically are you using inside of the CoroFlake to do this animation. Also, how is it controlled? I can hear a clicking noise each time the animation changes. Is that the mouse and are you changing animations or is it pre-programmed with certain sequences?

Actually this was built by Charles Loewe (tng5737). He was kind enough to send me a video of his finished coroflake. He made it using SmartString pixel modules (1804's)and the controller is actually just a generic unit he used for testing that had a built in test sequence. He used 45 pixel modules (about $1.10 each), a power supply and you'd also need one pixel controller which could run anywhere from $10 to $150 depending on how fancy and what other needs you had.

He posted the how-to in this thread (registration required):

http://diylightanimation.com/index.php?topic=5226.msg85928

Here is my write-up from soon to be published documentation:

Smart String Pixels (optional)

Charles Loewe provides the follow method for using square Smart String Pixels (http://diylightanimation.com/wiki/index.php?title=Equipment#Smart_Strings) with his CoroFlake. You will need nine pixel modules (http://www.aliexpress.com/fm-store/701799/209889132-374338613/TM1804-IC-led-pixel-module-DC12V-input-20pcs-a-string.html) per leg for a total of 45 pixels. Due to the spacing requirements, you will need to spread out the pixels by splicing wire (http://www.aliexpress.com/fm-store/701799/210128048-425559947/100m-lot-3pin-cable-for-RGB-color-led-strip-module-20AWG-100m-long.html) between some of the pixels according to the following schedule (see photo below for reference):

• Between pixels 1,2,3,4 you will have normal spacing and no extensions will be required.

• Between pixels 4,5,6,7,8,9 you will need to add about 10” of wire.

• After pixel 9 you will use 20” of wire to jump one of the wires to the next leg in the CoroFlake.

• As the wire gauge is not sufficient to carry power through all the pixels in a sequential fashion, you will need to “inject” power. Where the arrow is shown in the photo, separate the red, blue and green wires.

• Continue the green (data signal) wire from pixel 9 onto the next leg’s pixel 1 – do not continue the red or blue wires onto the next leg.

• Connect Red (12v positive) and the Blue (12v ground) of pixel 1 for each leg together in a star fashion.

You will also need to connect a 12v power supply (Item # 55 at http://www.holidaycoro.com/Hardware.asp), a power cord to the power supply and your smart string controller. Once complete you will have a fully self-contained element.

See the diagram on the next page for wiring instructions. Note you will need to view this document in color to make out all the wiring colors.

PM me if you'd like a copy of the wiring diagram and pixel layout (files are limited to 22k here on PC).

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