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TwoBits

Ease my wife's worries: Who on here leaves their Lightorama controllers outside?

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I'll have to add myslef to the, me too list :) 3 Controllers last year planning to add 4 more this year. Last winter we mostly had slush here in Nova Scotia and the boxes where out side from Nov 1 until mid feb, not running until Feb but outside.

-jim

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I have researched everyone who has posted in this thread. I should be over 1000 channels next year after a short December vacation...

Hmmm, My guess is that mine would disappear early on the 2010 B-Regal controller "collection" tour! LOL

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I put mine under a 5 gallon bucket turned upside down that I have taken a marker and scribbled "Septic sample" on.

Unwrap a Baby Ruth candy bar and place on top...

No one touches em' :)

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During four years, all LOR controllers have been outside, including 17 in 2009. Nothing covering them. Just out in the elements. This includes a LOR1602W with MP3 Show Director, 1 DC board in a plastic case, and 15 CTB16PC with provided plastic enclosure. And will do the same this year.

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All of my controllers are out in the elements. They are powered on during setup and remain powered till tear-down.

Same here.

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All of my customers (minus one that I know of) have all of their controllers outside. That is according to my count 78 controllers outside and only 3 having controllers that had to be taken care of (replaced or repaired). If you are using all of the 1602's or the other LOR Controllers, rest assured, they are well taken care of, and will be good for many years to come (as with the new ones that will join it in the next year! :) )

I'm sorry, is that 1,248 channels? Wow! is all I a can say. Actually amazing for someone whos "about me" says they don't have a display. Did I miss something?

Edited by BaldEagleChristmas

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. . .I have had my inflatable violated a couple years ago. I have many teen age kids cruising past my house.

I'm sorry your inflatable was violated.

Edited by BaldEagleChristmas

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It's pretty obvious that most leave theirs outside. This is my first year with controllers. I have planned on leaving them outside. My biggest concern is keeping them safe. Two will be mounted on the roof so out of touch, but the other three will be on the ground. I plan on attaching them to my mega tree post, so they will not be all that accessible. Anyone have any good ways of locking them down? I have had my inflatable violated a couple years ago. I have many teen age kids cruising past my house.

I like the idea of putting my mini conductor in a separate box with easy access.

Since I attach mine to U-shaped fence posts pictured below (2 parallel ones per controller) and they are pounded into the ground about 18", they are very difficult to remove as a pair once in the ground. Plus keeps the cords off the ground. And once the ground is near frozen, then I bet they are impossible to remove. And I attach them to the poles with bolts (nutted on the inside of the enclosure, going through the heat sink), so you have to open the enclosure to unbolt them. And then I put a cheap lock on the enclosure. I suppose you could chain lock them to the posts to but that is probably overkill. I tend to plant my controllers behind bushes and such (more for aesthetics) but also keeps them out of site so people can't figure out what they are. Most people have know idea how any of this works, so they don't understand the value of those boxes. One of the best things I have read on here was the leave them plain looking (some even paint them black or make them look dirty) so that they look unattractive (ie not valuable). However a cutesy giftbox covered controller looks attractive to a theft/vandal, to either smash or steal (not even realizing that there is a controller inside). I haven't been on here as long as others, but haven't heard many complaints regarding theft of controllers, but instead hear some about vandalism.

hebei%20yichen$52694837.jpg

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Add me to the raised hand column. My seven controllers are outside, 4 up on bricks on the ground. They are usually covered by a garbage bag, a bucket or whatever. I say usually because a few times over the years, the garbage bags have been torn loose by heavy winds..and I failed to replace them. They've never had any issues even when covered over by a couple of feet of snow. One is mounted to the chimney, one on the wall of the house, another is mounted to the back of a small signboard, those 3 are uncovered and they're fine too.. no issues, ever.

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Most of mine are outside. I have them attached to a backer board that is mounted on two 1/2" metal conduits that are concreted into the holes of cinder blocks. Very heavy, but also very stable. I chain/lock the unit to a tree. I also cover the entire mess (controllers and cables) with a black trash bag. This works great for me. Will have to get a pix to post.

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I make most of my controllers and they're less protected than the LOR controllers and I've had no problems outside.

Look at it this way, you use your car outside and it has much more complex electronics than a LOR controller. There are millions of cars around the world and if there was a problem, you would have heard about it by now.

Just don't drive your controller through the water. LOL

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I put mine under a 5 gallon bucket turned upside down that I have taken a marker and scribbled "Septic sample" on.

Unwrap a Baby Ruth candy bar and place on top...

No one touches em' :)

What no hot link or video????

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Since I attach mine to U-shaped fence posts pictured below (2 parallel ones per controller) and they are pounded into the ground about 18", they are very difficult to remove as a pair once in the ground. Plus keeps the cords off the ground. And once the ground is near frozen, then I bet they are impossible to remove. And I attach them to the poles with bolts (nutted on the inside of the enclosure, going through the heat sink), so you have to open the enclosure to unbolt them. And then I put a cheap lock on the enclosure. I suppose you could chain lock them to the posts to but that is probably overkill. I tend to plant my controllers behind bushes and such (more for aesthetics) but also keeps them out of site so people can't figure out what they are. Most people have know idea how any of this works, so they don't understand the value of those boxes. One of the best things I have read on here was the leave them plain looking (some even paint them black or make them look dirty) so that they look unattractive (ie not valuable). However a cutesy giftbox covered controller looks attractive to a theft/vandal, to either smash or steal (not even realizing that there is a controller inside). I haven't been on here as long as others, but haven't heard many complaints regarding theft of controllers, but instead hear some about vandalism.

hebei%20yichen$52694837.jpg

This is what i use also, but i cover the stake with 1 1/2 " pvc and put a cap on it. i use bolts to secure the pole to the pvc, and use the horseshoe clamp screwed into my boxes. never had a problem with moisture, and we had a lot of snow and rain last year, and i don't think i pulled them up till late march of last year.

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I leave them all outside, covered with snow sometimes, not a problem. I do use t-post security and run a cable through the boxes and posts for a bit of security, or around a tree (or megatree pole) if handy. Then use some cameras and warning on the boxes. Never had a problem. I do put the controllers for my roof items up on the roof or side of second story ... as it cuts cord use a lot and also makes those controllers secure.

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I've gone uber low tech. 18" rebar in the ground. Zip tie through the security hole on the size of the LOR box to the rebar. If I had a real security issue I'd do more, but so far, I've not had any issues. This also helps ensure the box stays closed during the season - with some of the rain we've received this year, it's worked well.

I do pay a little more attention to the boxes further from the house. For the boxes right next to the house, I didn't even use rebar this year. I just propped them up against the house behind the shrubs. If they come wandering in the yard far enough to get the boxes, 1.) My dogs WILL let me know and 2.) I'll have their face on camera from MULTIPLE sides... :) Again, if I had reason to suspect people wanted to take the controller boxes, I'd put more time and energy into securing them.

I guess some big HIGH VOLTAGE signs on the boxes might also help secure them. Along with the Babe Ruth idea...

Side note - years ago, I witnessed a hilarous event when someone played a prank on some friends. Was at a hotel resort - one of those lazy river things that people just float in. He unwrapped the Baby Ruth candy bar and set it adrift towards his friends. Talk about JUMPING out of a pool! I'm not sure I've ever laughed that hard in my life!

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I have 5 outside covered in black garbage bags.

Mike

I go the black trash bag route myself. All of the outside controllers are in them, 32 this year. Always have done it that way and never have had a problem.

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Mine are left out. I attached mine to boards, three on each board. Each board has eyelets to attach onto screw hooks attached to my porch. Since the controllers that have the factory enclosures have built in holes, I use a chain with padlocks to secure the controllers to porch columns. Its overkill for securing my investment but I sleep peacefully at night.

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This year my 17 controllers are outside at or around 15' away from the display element. 4 units are original LOR built units. The rest are homemade enclosures attached to wood boxes I built to house the cards. The controller stands hide behind the display elements and will present quite a problem of a would-be thief. They would have to disconnect 96 extension cords from the main station just to get to the "easier" 2 controller boxes. They are not only bulky, but extremely heave and hard to move by myself. 4 controllers are on the roof in Craftsman tool boxes sitting under the overhang and I'm not worried about them. With next year's expansion plans focused mostly on the roof (no room on the ground for anything more), I'll be adding more "tool box" controllers.

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I've run mine inside but here's the downside - I'm running nearly 5000 feet of extension cord (on a 48 channel show). I will likely run my expanded ones outside next year. Too many cords.

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