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MinnesotaMike

Taking down lights...

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I suspect this has been discussed before, but I'm never one to go "searching" for old threads.

After the holidays, when do you all typically take down your lights, displays, etc...? Here in MN, there's usually plenty of snow on the ground by January 2nd. Last year, I took stuff down the week after, and found a lot of cords buried or frozen to the ground. I actually ripped a couple cords on display pieces. I would prefer to wait until later, but I also don't wanna be "that guy". This is only my 3rd year putting up exterior decor, and I'm adding a few things. I'm not familiar with "protocol".

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I live in WI and my Mini trees were frozen to the ground until almost March. I didn't really care. The lights on my roof will be there until all the snow is gone and I have wasted so many lights by trying to pull them out of the ice and wrecking them. I do get my Mega tree down, but most of my power cords stay in the ground until I can safely pull them up. I did have the thought of coiling a 50ft cord under each mini tree and when it was time to pull them up plug the cord in with a flood light pointing down. The current would heat the cord which in turn should melt the ice. But instead, I am just raising all my stuff this year so they don't have the chance of freezing.

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Hey Mike, I am a little more traditional and to me there are 12 days of Christmas. This being so, I run my display until Jan. 6th. Weather permitting, I take my display down as soon as possible after that, so my display items don't get damaged by the variety of elements a New York winter can bring. I can remember a couple of years ago when the Deck the Halls movie came out and I went to see it with my daughter on Dec.28th, not only was it already out of most theaters by then(I had to drive 45 minutes to a movie theater in North Jersey to see it) but my daughter and I had the WHOLE theater to ourselves. I guess my point is that I may be the exception when it comes to this.

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I guess my point is that I may be the exception when it comes to this.

You should be the norm. I am thinking of leaving my lights on until Jan7. I have friends in Eastern Europe and they celebrate on the Orthodox calender with Christmas on Jan7. After that the lights come down when it is both safe for me and safe for the lights.

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Mine burn till the 7th of January, then I turn it off. If I can I take them down the weekend after that, if I can't due to weather I just leave em up don't really care.

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My lights go off on January 2nd. I do not take ANYTHING down till the weatehr cooperates. I am not going to spend all that time outside in the cold to take things down. I do prioritize things. The arches go down first as that clears teh area for me to walk around some and only takes 10 min to take down and stow for the off season. Mega trees are next as I do not want to chance any wind blown damage. My sign comes down early. The rest......that can wait till the weather is not so cold. If that is Feb or March...so be it....but I have to work in the cold to get things up...I do not have to work in the cold to take things down. NOTHING comes off the roof till it is clear and DRY!

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Last show on Dec 31, as much as possible comes down on Jan 1. As noted by Mike, the weather rarely cooperates, but the faster I get everything safely inside, the better I sleep at night (vandalism is a constant worry). I'm convinced that "up too long" displays are a vandal magnet, and even if not, the UV rays do a number on your lights if left up longer than essential.

After the 3rd year of fighting cords frozen to the ground (after many years without having that problem) I gave up last year and just abandoned most of the cords in the yard until the snow/ice went away. We got a warm spell in Februrary which made quick work of the ton of snow we had last year, and every night after work for a week or two, I'd walk the yard and be able to pick up a few dozen more cords.

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My grandson's birthday is Jan 7th so my lights stay on for him till then.I start taking down as weather permits after.It doesn't snow here but I don't much care for the cold LOL

This is my 1st year using LOR so don't know how well that will go over if I continue the show after the 1st.Might upset the neighbors if too much traffic.

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Our display is up till Jan. 1st. In Indiana the weather is unpredictable, so I pull the blowmolds

and inflatables out as soon as feasible, the cords and strings wait till they are thawed. Sometimes right away, sometimes not till end of Feb. or so.

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I've tried telling my wife that if we just left the display lit all year, we'd save a lot of time and trouble eliminating setup and tear down, but it's a no-go.

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My light shut off On Jan 6th (my b-day) and I start pulling lights off the bushes when I can. The roof grid stays up until I get a dry, no frozen roof.

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Two years ago, everything came down the first weekend of January. ...but then again, I didn't have anything in the yard that year.

If you remember how our Minnesota winter was last year, it was a different story... The lights came off the house right away in early January, as well as bringing in the controllers. I "Killed" one mini-tree trying to remove it, so I waited until the snow and ice melted in March.

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Interesting. Good to know. I suspect I may just have to leave some stuff out awhile longer this year. I primarily had trouble with the lights lining my sidewalk. They were all frozen to the ground, but I thought it might look silly to keep rows of candy canes out all winter long.

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I'll echo what everybody in the Northern climes has said, anything that's not frozen/snowed in, starts coming down Jan 2. Everything else waits until a significant thaw makes it possible. Like many others, I've destroyed cords trying to pull them out of the frozen ground.

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I also echo what others in the North have said. I do leave my display running until Epiphany (Jan. 6th), but after that, all blow molds and whatever isn't frozen in place are removed. Lights and cords are taken down once we start thawing out. I have had lights on the roof as late as March due to the ice and snow up there. No biggee though, so does everyone else in the Chicago area.

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I don't have snow to worry about, so I leave mine lit until the Saturday before the sunday that the epiphany is celebrated. I completely take the display down that sunday. (or at least put it all in the garage). The yard is usually covered with extension cords for about a week after that.

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Well at least you wait tell January 1st to toss the Christmas tree in the alley.

that One my pet peeve living in California , most people hear take everything down on Dec 26 :mad:

I start taking my display starts coming down around January 1st, but try to leaves some up for January winter night light display.

My display starts coming down January 1st.

(The first thing we do, though, is toss the Christmas tree in the alley.)

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It's a good thing I have no snow or ice to worry about...

I start tear down on January 1st or 2nd.

The inside stuff, comes down December 26th and that's because my mother says the house is too crowded and wants it down. Can't argue...

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