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Greg.Ca

How to anchor mega tree?

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What method are most people using to secure their mega tree into the ground?? In other words, how are you attaching the guy wires into the ground?? I have seen some coiled anchors that are primarily used to secure your dogs lease so that your dog dosent run away but I'm afraid that after a large wind that these coiled screw in 'anchors' will simply pull out of the grund. Ideas?? --Greg--

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On friday, i concreted a 2' poll into the ground with a female adapter. I then cemented 3-18" all-threads into the ground 8' from the pole with a female adapter and an eye-hook. I welded chain links around the 2.5" pole at 9' from the bottom and 18' from the bottom. On Sunday i lifted the pole into the female adapter and tightened it in place with a pipe wrench and used 3/16" cable and turnbuckles to secure it to the eye-hooks. Then i used concrete screws to attach 3 D-rings to the driveway and our rock fence, and again used the cable and turnbuckles coming from the top of the pole.

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I do understand that you have used some sort of concrete anchoring in the ground. Do you by any chance have a photo?? I do realize that the screw in type coiled dog anchor won't work as a strong wind will simply pull it out of the ground. I will try to build something strong but would want to have the grass grow over this in the summer. Any photos??--Greg--

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I will take a photo for you when i get home this evening. Let me say...today the wind is 41mph and my neighbor that helped me set it up, called to tell me that the star 20' in the air isn't even flinching in these high winds.

Also, i have everything flush with the dirt. I will be adding grass in the spring, so everything will be easy to find without a lawnmower catching it.

Edited by drivemewilder

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What method are most people using to secure their mega tree into the ground?? In other words, how are you attaching the guy wires into the ground?? I have seen some coiled anchors that are primarily used to secure your dogs lease so that your dog dosent run away but I'm afraid that after a large wind that these coiled screw in 'anchors' will simply pull out of the grund. Ideas?? --Greg--

I'm planning on using the coil dog leash thing to anchor my mega tree. From what I understand, they need to be screwed in at the same angle as the guy wires. (So they are in a straight line with the wire. - If I'm wrong on this, please correct me, and tell us "Why" :)) This could force them to unscrew, so I'm planning on pounding a short piece of pipe through the top triangle to keep it from (un)twisting once the wires are installed.

I don't have pictures, but I'll post them once I get to installing the tree.

-Mark

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I'm planning on using the coil dog leash thing to anchor my mega tree. From what I understand, they need to be screwed in at the same angle as the guy wires. (So they are in a straight line with the wire. - If I'm wrong on this, please correct me, and tell us "Why" :)) This could force them to unscrew, so I'm planning on pounding a short piece of pipe through the top triangle to keep it from (un)twisting once the wires are installed.

I don't have pictures, but I'll post them once I get to installing the tree.

-Mark

Mark - I don't know if those coiled "dog lead" anchors will hold well, but these 30" earth anchors will (http://www.amazon.com/Midwest-Air-Technologies-901114A-Anchor/dp/B002YOQEFK).

You can get 'em at HD, Lowes, or Menard's and the 30" ones will hold around 2000lbs.

They are designed to be screwed in-line with the load - like you indicated in your post. I used 4 last year and not only did they work great, but tree didn't budge in some 60+ mph winds we got in a nasty December storm. At ~$5 each I doubt you'll find a better solution for the price, I would seriously look at these over a concreted solution unless you have very lose or sandy soil where you are.

I also will wager you a box of Christmas lights you won't need to drive pipe through the top. Once they're in, they're in!

Jacob

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Jacob, How difficult is it to installl one of these 'earth archors'?? Does it require the strength of Hulk Hogan or can a regular normal guy screw one of these things into the ground?? How are they screwed into the ground? --Greg--

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I built my first MegaTree last year. 20ft'er used about 400 lbs of concrete and put a 3in PVC tube to drop my post into. About 3 ft down. I used 2 1/4 metal EMT I attached guy wires but never bothed to secure them. We had a couple of days of more then 60mph winds. Never moved.

-jim

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Jacob, How difficult is it to installl one of these 'earth archors'?? Does it require the strength of Hulk Hogan or can a regular normal guy screw one of these things into the ground?? How are they screwed into the ground? --Greg--

We have pretty tough soil with lots of clay here. That being said I was able to put 'em in 2/3 with my hand. The last 1/3 required a long screwdriver for leverage, but it was doable by hand. It took may 5 minutes per anchor to screw them all the way down.

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How do they work in Rocky soil? My biggest problem is trying to get stuff into the ground, I have hard ground with lots of small rocks to contend with.

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here is a picture of my pole sleeve, cemented 2' in the ground. it is inset inside of one of those round landscape covers so at the end of the season you put the cover on and it disappears

68699_869066137570_23903927_45468909_731170_n.jpg

tonight i am going to work on setting 4 eyes into cement also. then i will use a shackle and a turnbuckle to tie down the tree. each of these eyes will be inside a landscape box also to make it disappear

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Dog anchors BAD. If have seen disastrous results after rain then high wind. Use methods above that will with stand the elements and their effect on your soil.

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How do they work in Rocky soil? My biggest problem is trying to get stuff into the ground, I have hard ground with lots of small rocks to contend with.

They might be a real bear in rocky soil. I hit a tree root with one and it make it through, but it was a bit tough going. I imagine the blade would move the odd rock here or there out of the way, but if the soil was lousy with rocks it would be bad (so would any method of getting a hole in the ground).

FWIW - once you got them in, they wouldn't be going anywhere.

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This is something I have always thought people can go overboard. I have two ten foot trees and one 30 foot. I have no concrete at all. I do use the earth anchors and my daughters helped put them in when they were 4 and 7. As for the center pole, I use two methods. My small 10' trees, I just use a big yellow tent stake I bought at Mendards and put that where I want it, set my pole over is, then attach the anchors. My 10' trees, I just use rebar. I have been doing that for years. My big tree, I have made a center pole anchor out of a mail box spike, I also bought at Menards. I used to put it in the ground and screw my pole onto the coupling, but I have made a pivot and I can tilt the tree up. My anchors for the guy wires are 30" earth anchors that I have sunk in the ground and covered with irrigation boxes.

I have moved my tree a couple times. By using concrete you are limiting yourself to moving your tree. All I need to do is unscrew my anchors and move them. Hope this helps!

[ATTACH=CONFIG]38890[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]38891[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]38888[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]38889[/ATTACH]

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How do they work in Rocky soil? My biggest problem is trying to get stuff into the ground, I have hard ground with lots of small rocks to contend with.

With rocky soil you will have better luck with "Duckbill Earth Anchors", they work great in most soils but because of the way they go into the ground they are more likely to go between smaller rocks than the auger type.

The small ones are as little as $3.50 each and the install rod is under $10.00, the medium sized Duckbill is around $8.00 each and has a 1100 lb rating. The only bad thing about them is they are not removable.

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On friday, i concreted a 2' poll into the ground with a female adapter. I then cemented 3-18" all-threads into the ground 8' from the pole with a female adapter and an eye-hook. I welded chain links around the 2.5" pole at 9' from the bottom and 18' from the bottom. On Sunday i lifted the pole into the female adapter and tightened it in place with a pipe wrench and used 3/16" cable and turnbuckles to secure it to the eye-hooks. Then i used concrete screws to attach 3 D-rings to the driveway and our rock fence, and again used the cable and turnbuckles coming from the top of the pole.

Wow! That sounds like you could tether a battle ship to it! It may be that our weather is just different, because anything In the ground here in Minnesota will Stay In the ground come November when the ground freezes. I use 10" U shaped staples (Gardner's Supply) to secure items close to the ground and rebar or dog stakes with 16 GA wire to secure PVC that is say higher than 3". No problems, yet.

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Greg, I used those rods from lowes (home depot?) which are over in the concrete supplies. They are about 1/2-3/4" (or more) in diameter and have holes in the ends. I put four of them in around my megatree (at an angle) with an engineering hammer and then I just ran wire through the holes the form a temporary loop. Then I hooked turnbuckles to those and the other end of the turnbuckles to the guy wires (aircraft cable I bought on ebay). The guy wires were held in place with those simple wire clamps from home depot, that clamp down with a couple of nuts with a hex driver. I got this idea from holdman and his behind the scenes video and it all worked great. I did buy the hawrdware and wires online since the price was so much cheaper. The cable clamps were especially cheap to buy online as opposed to at home depot/lowes. Removing them was not that difficult, but was a little harder than removing rebar. I used the same removal technique that I do for rebar ... (1) one solid hit to break ice, (2) attach vice grips and turn a number of times in the hole, (3) pull out of the hole. I probably put them in too deep last year, so removing did take some effort, but I did it myself and am not very strong ... but I'd say they were less than half way into the ground. They were extremely strong and handled 35 mph winds no problem on a 20' megatree. I do not recommend those dog anchors for Colorado soil at all. I like this solution as its easy to remove when done and your not pouring concrete in the yard or embedding anchors. An alternative to this might have been to use rebar and just hook something onto the rebar rods itself ... as the rebar was extremely easy to remove (easier than putting in). I highly reccomend the 1/2" rebar for twig trees, 4' rods from home depot keep them in place through all the wind. When you put up or take down the megatree (assuming 20' or more?) make sure you have 4 and ideally 5 persons involved in that process ... with people holding onto the guy wires. Put something solid under the pole, or it'll sink into the yard. Put a really solid board if nothing else.

Edited by taybrynn

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These are what I used:

36" round steel forming stakes for concrete forms (qty 4)

http://www.lowes.com/pd_84070-46086-655124_0__?productId=3044375&Ntt=steel+stake&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl__0__s%3FNtt%3Dsteel%2Bstake

They are extremely dirty, but extremely strong and have the holes already in them, for running wire through to make a loop for the turnbuckle.

Like I said, using 1/2" rebar driven in at an angle might also work, just use a clamp to form the loop instead. Rebar was easier to remove from the ground than these, because of the ribs on the rebar working like a drill bit (spin 10 times, then it just lifts out easily, no hulk strength required).

I've already decided to move the megatree this year, so glad I didn't do sleeves in the ground with concrete. I have sprinkler system all through this area, so may be wise to note the locations of the heads and pipe, if you want to avoid them. I just winged it last year and got lucky, didn't hit any sprinkler stuff.

Edited by taybrynn

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With my smaller stuff I have alway used the construction stakes (the metal stakes from Lowes) and I think I will do it again this year. In our soil, I think the 36" stake will go in and hold it without any problems.

Thanks for the help.

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Wow! That sounds like you could tether a battle ship to it! It may be that our weather is just different, because anything In the ground here in Minnesota will Stay In the ground come November when the ground freezes. I use 10" U shaped staples (Gardner's Supply) to secure items close to the ground and rebar or dog stakes with 16 GA wire to secure PVC that is say higher than 3". No problems, yet.

Yep Mike, i intend to build an ark to further celebrate who Christ is! Honestly, this is my first Christmas at this house and my first year to have a 20' tree. It will be only 10' from the street, not to mention i just bought my wife a brand new car that is parked in the driveway about 10' away. I absolutely don't want this thing crashing down on my on-lookers or her new car. We routinely have 40-50mph winds during the holiday season, so i would rather be safe than sorry. I agree, it's overkill...but the 2.5" pipe was free so i used it, and man-o-man is it heavy. Anyhow, i said i would post a pic of my turnbuckle and D-ring so here it is. There has been alot of good info posted, my pic may not be useful at all but here it is.

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Mark - I don't know if those coiled "dog lead" anchors will hold well, but these 30" earth anchors will (http://www.amazon.com/Midwest-Air-Technologies-901114A-Anchor/dp/B002YOQEFK).

You can get 'em at HD, Lowes, or Menard's and the 30" ones will hold around 2000lbs.

They are designed to be screwed in-line with the load - like you indicated in your post. I used 4 last year and not only did they work great, but tree didn't budge in some 60+ mph winds we got in a nasty December storm. At ~$5 each I doubt you'll find a better solution for the price, I would seriously look at these over a concreted solution unless you have very lose or sandy soil where you are.

I also will wager you a box of Christmas lights you won't need to drive pipe through the top. Once they're in, they're in!

Jacob

I'm with Jacob on this one. I use the 30" earth anchors for my 30' mega tree. With our blizzard last year, my mega tree didn't budge.

Here is how I attached my guy wires to the anchors.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]39025[/ATTACH]

Then I used a turnbuckle to make minor adjustments once up.

Edited by Santas Helper

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So I guess I am tying down a couple arks. But my tree won't come down. Last year we did a 10' tree. This year we will be 24' tall from the ground

2' of it will be in this sleeve in the ground

And then there are 4 of these anchors in the ground that will have turnbuckles attached to them. The bolts are 12" long and the cement goes down 2'

In the offseason the green covers go on and grass can grow over them

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I'm planning on using the coil dog leash thing to anchor my mega tree. From what I understand, they need to be screwed in at the same angle as the guy wires. (So they are in a straight line with the wire. - If I'm wrong on this, please correct me, and tell us "Why" :)) This could force them to unscrew, so I'm planning on pounding a short piece of pipe through the top triangle to keep it from (un)twisting once the wires are installed.

I don't have pictures, but I'll post them once I get to installing the tree.

-Mark

This is what I use, and has worked well. Never found that they unscrew on their own. I get the nicer dog stakes from Lowes/HD (not the short cheap dollar store types). I attach turnbuckles to them so I can make any adjustments. I suppose if the ground flooded there they might pull out, but experienced nothing close to that. Our ground more or less freezes during the winter, so they become even more solid.

Now if I had a 30'+ tree, I would maybe consider something else. Mine is about 18'. My tree pole is "anchored" to a green temporary fence post that is driven 2ft into the ground. Allows for everything to be temporary installation.

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I just use this guy wire collar and four strands of 3/8" cable, and four heavy duty tent style stakes. We get pretty gusty winds in my area and it never even moves.

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