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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Mel Fischer

What is your opinion?

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In 2006 Union products closed their doors and all the molds and equipment were sold to Faster Form along with the Union Products Name. Faster Form used some of the molds they purchased to make blow molds that they sold under the Union Products name. In a short time Faster Form closed their doors and they sold the molds to Cado along with the Union Products name and they are now making a few of the items and selling them under the Union Products name, we received two of their penguins this week.

My question is, since the three different companies owned the Union Products name and made products under that name should the products from the original Union Products, Faster Form and Cado all be thought of as being made by different companies or since they all have been sold under the Union Products name should they all be considered as being from one company for recording the history of blow molds and manufacturers?

What are your views on this?

Mel

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For history sake,I would say it should be listed by manufacture,but if they didn't add there company logo,it would be difficult to distinguish one from the other.

So how is the quality ie. paint,plastic thickness is it the same as Union?

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In 2006 Union products closed their doors and all the molds and equipment were sold to Faster Form along with the Union Products Name. Faster Form used some of the molds they purchased to make blow molds that they sold under the Union Products name. In a short time Faster Form closed their doors and they sold the molds to Cado along with the Union Products name and they are now making a few of the items and selling them under the Union Products name, we received two of their penguins this week.

My question is, since the three different companies owned the Union Products name and made products under that name should the products from the original Union Products, Faster Form and Cado all be thought of as being made by different companies or since they all have been sold under the Union Products name should they all be considered as being from one company for recording the history of blow molds and manufacturers?

What are your views on this?

Mel

Mel, that's an excellent question. For historical purposes, I'm thinking along the lines of what happened to Jeep. In thinking back on the history of the Jeep, Willys Overland was the first to produce a vehicle called a GP, General Purpose, which became known as Jeep. After WWII, Jeeps were still made by Willys until that company folded. Thereafter, Kaiser bought the line and sold Jeeps under the Jeep brand until that company went down. Jeep was then absorbed by American Motors (AMC) until they were went out of business. Chrysler bought only the Jeep line from AMC and has owned it and produced the vehicles ever since. Chrysler has now been absorbed/partnered by/with Fiat, but they will continue to produce Jeeps.

Branding is what I'm thinking of here. In my mind, no matter who makes the Jeep, it's still a Jeep. Union Products as a brand has intrinsic value so it would make sense for the parent companies to market them as such. So in my opinion (and its only my opinion) I believe that although Cado, as the parent company, is the manufacturer of the molds, the molds are in fact Union Products molds. For historical purposes, perhaps doing what I did with the Jeep example is the way to go.

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For history sake,I would say it should be listed by manufacture,but if they didn't add there company logo,it would be difficult to distinguish one from the other.

So how is the quality ie. paint,plastic thickness is it the same as Union?

Daryl, I bought some of the new Union pencil ghosts. I was very impressed with the quality and the paint although they did not use a double c7 cord as Union did (one bulb in the body and one bulb in the head). The plastic is of good quality, thick, and not as translucent as what Union had been using, they are very white. I have to honestly say I am very pleased with the ghosts I bought, but I do not know how their other molds are at this point.

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My opinion, for what it's worth, is a Union Mold is a Union Mold. I have to agree with Carrie. A Jeep has always been a Jeep, no matter who made/makes it.

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My opinion, for what it's worth, is a Union Mold is a Union Mold. I have to agree with Carrie. A Jeep has always been a Jeep, no matter who made/makes it.

I would tend to agree with Carrie on the jeep, but General foam makes both Empire and Santas Best molds and while they may look close to the originals they lack the quality that went into the old molds.with that thought in mind I haven't seen any of the new Union pcs. yet so I can't judge there quality but if they follow GF.they will start out pretty desent and slowly cut corners to make a profit (I hope they dont) but who's to say.So with that thought in mind,it would be nice if someone just starting out say ten or twenty years from know could reference the time line for Union and all the companies that follow.Just my two cents.

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I would tend to agree with Carrie on the jeep, but General foam makes both Empire and Santas Best molds and while they may look close to the originals they lack the quality that went into the old molds.with that thought in mind I haven't seen any of the new Union pcs. yet so I can't judge there quality but if they follow GF.they will start out pretty desent and slowly cut corners to make a profit (I hope they dont) but who's to say.So with that thought in mind,it would be nice if someone just starting out say ten or twenty years from know could reference the time line for Union and all the companies that follow.Just my two cents.

Daryl, I see your point and it's well taken. The difference is, General Foam bought the steel molds and did not buy the brand names, Empire and Santa's Best (SB is still an ongoing company, they just no longer produce blow molds). Cado bought the name Union Products as well as the steel molds.. so there is a difference in terms of legality. Cado can legally produce the molds using the Union name..

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I think the Jeep analogy is a good one. Companies get bought and sold all the time. Even in the food category: for example, Chex cereals used to be sold by Ralston. Some time ago, they were acquired by General Mills. Does that effect you, the Chex Mix eater? Not really...

Makes for an interesting tidbit when researching the history of companies though, and is definitely notable...

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Mel, if the molds produced are indistinguishable between the three corporate entities, then they should all be considered "Union". If a new paint scheme or maker's mark appears on a mold from the "new" manufacturer, then differentiating them becomes possible and necessary. I'm just grateful that SOMEONE is making some Union molds this year, and I honestly don't care who they are. I can hardly wait for the Christmas ones to show up in my area.

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They could be refered to as something like "UnionC" or "Union C" or something like that to distinguish between the two companies... That might be an idea. :confused:

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I agree we should just refer to them as union. Then if someone ever buys then out and changes the name we can add union to the blow mold graveyard and add the new maker. Until that happens they are still union molds.

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My humble opinion: I think the molds should be known as Union product by Cado. Like Judith Novelty by Empire??

Edited by CARS8

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This is an interesting question. My thought is they would be considered Union Products. Take GF for example, I have many of their molds that they have remade from Empires molds and to me they are still Empire so I think of them as that. But with the quality issues in my records they are Empire/GF it is tough when so many other companies have made the same molds. On a historical point they probably should be recorded as to exactly who made them. Because as we know the new companies do alter little things here and there.

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Mel, that's an excellent question. For historical purposes, I'm thinking along the lines of what happened to Jeep. In thinking back on the history of the Jeep, Willys Overland was the first to produce a vehicle called a GP, General Purpose, which became known as Jeep. After WWII, Jeeps were still made by Willys until that company folded. Thereafter, Kaiser bought the line and sold Jeeps under the Jeep brand until that company went down. Jeep was then absorbed by American Motors (AMC) until they were went out of business. Chrysler bought only the Jeep line from AMC and has owned it and produced the vehicles ever since. Chrysler has now been absorbed/partnered by/with Fiat, but they will continue to produce Jeeps.

Branding is what I'm thinking of here. In my mind, no matter who makes the Jeep, it's still a Jeep. Union Products as a brand has intrinsic value so it would make sense for the parent companies to market them as such. So in my opinion (and its only my opinion) I believe that although Cado, as the parent company, is the manufacturer of the molds, the molds are in fact Union Products molds. For historical purposes, perhaps doing what I did with the Jeep example is the way to go.

Carrie, can you clarify your opinion a bit more? For historical purposes should the Union Products items from1946 to the present date be recorded as being from Union Products with no information about the other four manufacturers that made them or should they be recorded as Union Products and the information about the other manufacturers be included? That is basically what my question was.

Considering your Jeep example, I am assuming that you think that the other information should be included, but you do not specifically say that.

Mel

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Mel, specifically..IMO they are Union Products molds because the Union Products brand name is owned by Cado and I believe that is how they are being sold. Include the history of the company..as I did with Jeep. :)

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I think the Jeep analogy is a good one. Companies get bought and sold all the time. Even in the food category: for example, Chex cereals used to be sold by Ralston. Some time ago, they were acquired by General Mills. Does that effect you, the Chex Mix eater? Not really...

Well, I do feel a little better knowing that my Chex cereal is now being made by General Mills, a cereal company, instead of Ralston Purina, the dog food people. :)

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Thank you everyone who posted a reply to my question, it is appreciated. As for my including the companies information anywhere, that was not the point of my asking the question, I was only interested in others views on the subject.

Mel

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Well, I do feel a little better knowing that my Chex cereal is now being made by General Mills, a cereal company, instead of Ralston Purina, the dog food people. :)

Ralston still makes cereal, just not under their own name anymore-- they make a lot of the store-branded stuff: http://www.ralstonfoods.com/

According to Wikipedia. the name "Chex" comes from the checkerboard logo of Ralston-Purina, that is still used on the dog food :)

-Tim

P.S. (Sorry to derail your thread Mel!)

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