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Rosettes. How do i get them to turn out lighter in color ?


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Ive been making Rosettes for about 8 years now. Ive gotten pretty good at it except one thing eludes me. Mine always turn out slightly darker in color compared to those you can buy at the grocery store.

I have experimented with the heat and the cook duration. I run at a steady 375 deg f. Too cool (350)and they dont cook and too high (385-400)they burn. I always use new veg oil. Of course the goal is to cook them until they are crispy throughout. Remove them from the oil too soon (less cook time = lighter color) and i find that parts of the cookie are still 'doughy' rather than crisp. Ive tried flipping them sooner and later, holding them down in the oil with the iron longer and releasing them from the iron sooner. Ive thinned out the batter to avoid too much of a thick blob buildup on the edges and center.

Ive wondered if the vanilla extract in the batter recipe could be the culprit.

Mine dont taste burnt, theyre good.

Im just wondering how the Rosette factory gets their rosettes to come out potato chip colored rather than mcdonalds french fry color.

Comments? Ideas?

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Not very many Rosette makers here i guess.

Well, i might understand the reason. They 'are' a bit of a pain in the axe to make. Considering the effort and setup time, i usually make about 15 dozen. The worst part is the smell resulting from the frying process. I do mine out in the garage. I dont like all that fried food smell in the closed up house.

But sure worth it when its all said and done.

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I haven't made them in years but a friend of mine works at the local Lion's Club booth during the fair gave me a head's up tip. She told me that they use PEANUT OIL instead of veggie oil. It takes the heat better (higher temps) and produces a better color. That is the kind of oil most of the restaurants use to deep fry their food.

Good Luck!

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I haven't made them in years but a friend of mine works at the local Lion's Club booth during the fair gave me a head's up tip. She told me that they use PEANUT OIL instead of veggie oil. It takes the heat better (higher temps) and produces a better color. That is the kind of oil most of the restaurants use to deep fry their food.

Good Luck!

Yep, My wife and I make Rosettes and Krumkake every year for Christmas. The peanut oil definately is the way to go for Rosettes. And now that more people are deep frying their turkeys (also uses peanut oil), it's much easier to find than a few years ago.

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Peanut oil eh? Hmmmm...ill have to try that.

Thanks for the tip. :-)

So, on a Rosette related topic.

Do you coat them with powdered sugar? Grandma used to do them this way. I did it one year, powdered them ahead of time then to my dismay i found that the powdered sugar absorbed the oil in the cookie and lost its powdery consistancy. I wonder if its not best to powder them just before serving.

Anyways, i was comparing rosette notes with a guy at work who makes them. He coats his with a mixture of granulated sugar and cinnamon. I tried it and found i like the sugar/cinnamon treatment better.

What do you people do with your rosettes?

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  • 4 weeks later...

We've used both powdered sugar (after cooled/prior to serving) and cinnamon/sugar.

Where did you get your rosette maker?

I remember my grandmother having a heavy cast iron one. I bought a lighter weight model, and it just does work as well.

Thanks,

Lee

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  • 2 weeks later...

... What do you people do with your rosettes?

Dip 1/2 way in chocolate (white, Dark and or Milk) or completely cover with dark chocolate, after the chocolate is almost set, turn them upside down and dust with powdered sugar (gives an interesting look).

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  • 2 months later...

Where did you get your rosette maker?

I remember my grandmother having a heavy cast iron one. I bought a lighter weight model, and it just does work as well.

Thanks,

Lee

Ive got both, the aluminum and cast iron. My cast iron model was made by 'giswald'. They are a well known cast iron skillet maker. I prefer the cast iron model, it seems to retain its heat better. One thing i do to make things easier on Rosette day; the first time i use an iron i use a small metal file to remove all little burrs which would prevent the rosette from falling off the iron.

I like that idea of using melted chocolate on the rosette. Ill have to try that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ive got both, the aluminum and cast iron. My cast iron model was made by 'giswald'. They are a well known cast iron skillet maker. I prefer the cast iron model, it seems to retain its heat better. One thing i do to make things easier on Rosette day; the first time i use an iron i use a small metal file to remove all little burrs which would prevent the rosette from falling off the iron.

I like that idea of using melted chocolate on the rosette. Ill have to try that.

I say go cake

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