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Repainting Blow Molds


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I see this thread has gotten quite a bit longer while I haven't checked it. Carrie, I must agree with you about the primer. Primer is meant to seal off the color your putting it over. If you put primer on a stripped blow mold, you will be blocking the plastic. Primer will definitely retard the light unless you use a clear primer like Tom suggested.

Exactly, Sadie, I agree about the use of primer, it would retard the light from penetrating the mold. I may give clear primer a try at some point, but so far so good without it :)

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I've only stripped and repainted a few molds (stripped and refinished many pieces of antique furniture, so the stripping part I'm very familiar and comfortable with). As a newbie mold repainter, the biggest problem I have is the new paint coming out blotchy. And I'm pretty sure that has to do with how clean I'm getting the mold after stripping. You have to be sure to get off ALL residue from the stripper. The mold needs to be squeaky, squeaky clean, and totally dry, or the new paint will not stick well.

Good luck with your projects! Can't wait to see pictures!

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I have a few blow molds I'd like to try to repaint (once I get up the courage) LOL! I am especially concerned about the stripping process. Don't wanna mess up. I've never had any previous experience doing anything like this. Maybe this spring I'll give it a try.

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Guest A.F.NUT

Scotty I'm with you!! I've never stripped a mold but I've stripped painted houses, furniture, and cars. Its the painting Im worried about lol

Jim

Jim the stripping is so easy! I use the Jasko it's wonderful to deal with, being a water soluable product just put the mold in a utility tub apply with a paint brush, let it sit a few minutes and scrub with a scrub brush and rinse sometimes it takes a few applications depending on the paint and then clean it good. The way I look at painting if it needs painting, the mold is already pretty much ruined and if you screw up, simply strip it and try again, there isn't much to painting, if you can master the fine art of unrolling masking tape and pressing the top of a spray can you can probably repaint a mold! It just takes a little time and patience!

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I have never felt the need to prime any of my molds. Using the propper paint and then sealing them when their done has worked well for me, but as you said there is no real set book to go by. If you are going to prime. I would recomend the clear plastic primer. I used it on my vinyl shutters since I didn't want to special order my color. The stuff went on great, gave them a chalky feel, and completely clear. Didn't matter on those but on a mold it would be better clear than white.

I had no idea there was any such animal as clear primer! Thanks for the info, it may be the solution I was looking for.

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  • 2 years later...

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