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bdeditch

Whats your thought's on this plan

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My Megatree never survied the whole season, which is OK, I learned some things from it. What I had was a 7 foot section of 2 inch Rigid conduit,tapered swedge to 20 feet (2 ten foot sections) 1-1/2 inch Rigid Conduit. I am not sure what schedule this pipe is, but I thought it would last. In our recent wind storm, and last year we had one as well with no problems, the tree came down. The threads broke off in the collar from the swedge on the 1-1/2 inch side. I had the top tied back on 4 side's, but one side was just a 18 inch peg, which was fine until the ground got so wet from all of the rain we had this year. The wind rocked it enough to pull that peg out, other 3 stayed intact because they are 3 feet in the ground. On the peg side there is to many under ground power lines to do it.

My plans are to use 2 inch Schedule 40 black pipe, 3 feet go in ground and other 4 above. On top of that another 2 inch to 1-1/2 tapered Swedge and then a 21 foot one piece black pipe, with my raising head on top of that, for a grand total of 27 feet above ground. And I am going to use better collars or coupling, how every you want to call them. The ones that come with the conduit are not that tough and short in length. On the side I can't cement in a hold back, I plan on making some cement anchors out of 5 gallon pails, with a anchor in each one. If I have to I will make 4 of them and spread them out to that side.

The attached images show the threads broken off in the 1-1/2 conduit and the 2 inch pole how it bent in the ground

Do you think I am over doing it, I just don't need to replace another windshield next year.

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why not attached braces to three or four sides to give it the support you want. You would run up your piping costs, but if placed correctly, it would take a hurricane to blow over your tree. For added security, mount the braces to concrete.

I am not sure I would use 5 gallon buckets though. Use something wider to give you a bigger footprint and then more weight at the bottom to secure your anchors.

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Consider using the Monkhouse Jack Up Mega Pole (JUMP). I saw it in person this summer and it is amazing. When I saw it, it was used with a "portable hole" that is also amazing. And if you want a testimonial, ask Carrie Sansing how well it held up her Blow Mold Mega Tree, which is basically a giant sail, against the strong winds of last fall. Really this is worth checking out.

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why not attached braces to three or four sides to give it the support you want. You would run up your piping costs, but if placed correctly, it would take a hurricane to blow over your tree. For added security, mount the braces to concrete.

I am not sure I would use 5 gallon buckets though. Use something wider to give you a bigger footprint and then more weight at the bottom to secure your anchors.

True about the 5 gallon pails, they will be top heavy. I think I will use an old tire. I made a stand for my metal roller with one and it has 120 pounds of cement in it. I was thinking of the brace thing as well.

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Consider using the Monkhouse Jack Up Mega Pole (JUMP). I saw it in person this summer and it is amazing. When I saw it, it was used with a "portable hole" that is also amazing. And if you want a testimonial, ask Carrie Sansing how well it held up her Blow Mold Mega Tree, which is basically a giant sail, against the strong winds of last fall. Really this is worth checking out.

The tree would be good on flat ground, which I do not have.

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I think the threaded couplers are the problem. They do not provide any strength to the pole. Any lateral load to the top of the upper section will bear on the thread and it will fail very quickly. We put up 27' trees this year made entirely from thin wall EMT We used 1 1/2 bottom section set 18 inches in the ground. Slid a 1 1/4 section 2 feet into the bottom and created a stop point with just a few dimples struck into the 1 1/2 section. One set of 4 guy ropes from the top and it's held up all season and we had a couple 30mph nights.

Larry

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I think the threaded couplers are the problem. They do not provide any strength to the pole. Any lateral load to the top of the upper section will bear on the thread and it will fail very quickly. We put up 27' trees this year made entirely from thin wall EMT We used 1 1/2 bottom section set 18 inches in the ground. Slid a 1 1/4 section 2 feet into the bottom and created a stop point with just a few dimples struck into the 1 1/2 section. One set of 4 guy ropes from the top and it's held up all season and we had a couple 30mph nights.

Larry

I am not going to blame the coupler, it was the type of coupler it was.

The Conduit coupler and not made for any type of pressure that it was put under. A good Schdule 40 coupler will hold up a lot better and a person will be able to tightening it more. I did some test in our yard and was able to strip out the treads on both the female and male parts of the conduit no problem. Using Sch. 40 Black pipe it was impossible, using a 36 inch pipe wrench. I striped the Conduit with a 24 inch pipe wrench, one hand. Different thread depth, but still 11-1/2 threads per inch.

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My only observation about black pipe is that it rusts easier than galvanized. If you decide to use black pipe, be sure to paint it and grease the threads often.

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My only observation about black pipe is that it rusts easier than galvanized. If you decide to use black pipe, be sure to paint it and grease the threads often.

A lot of the black pie is shellacked now a days just because of that.

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It has been a dozen years since I worked with black pipe. My last experience did not turn out well (*not a Christmas project, but one in real life).

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On my mega tree I am using galvanized EMT 1 1/4. I slide a 2 foot piece of 1 inch into the middle put a bolt thru the 1 1/4 and 1 inch peice. I then attach the two with the coupler, drill a hole in the top piece and again put a bolt through both pieces.

This allows me to pull one bolt and unscrew the 2 sections but it has also withstood 50 MPH winds.

Just my .02

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I have used a 21 foot piece of 1-1/2" galvanized pipe for my mega tree for the last 2 years with no problems at all. I used the kit from Darryl at Christmas Lightshow for the winch, pulley, and top guy wire tie offs which I ran 5/16" galv cable to 6 foot rods driven into the ground for the 4 guy wire supports. I also have a piece of 2" galv pipe 3 feet long that is set in cement as a sleeve for the 1-1/2" pipe to drop down into (it goes in a little over 2-1/2 feet). That gives me a little over 18 feet of pipe up from the ground.

Last year I had 60 mph+ winds with 96 strings of lights on the tree and 6 strings of stobes inside and the tree never even wavered.

And yes it is a little bit of a pain to set up, but the peace of mind is worth it to me.

Personally I would recommend galv pipe over black iron as well since it will hold up much better over time. I use a lot of galv pipe on docks on the lake here to hold them in place and the galv resists rust and corrosion very nicely. You could always paint the galv pipe if you want to, but it looks fine during the day as far as I can tell.

My 2 cents for you to consider.

Bill

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