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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

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Dale W

How did you find your current job?

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I see that there are many members here that are looking for employment. To help them and others out, I thought it might be a good idea to share how you found your current job. Perhaps we can get some decorators back to work so they can concentrate on their hobby.

I was paying my gas bill online and happened to see a careers link. A few clicks later, I saw a position that I was totally qualified for and immediately completed the companies online application for it.

A few weeks later I was called in for an interview. Several weeks later, they made me an offer.

edit: please give a summary of how you found out about a position in the company you work for

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I'm still at my very first job, been working in retail for 10 years... got bumped up in position as they needed me, and I'm satisfied where I am... but if you have a degree for something specific (a career)... Stick to it... You'll find something! And don't forget... just cause you came across a job that doesnt seem perfect, nothing says you can't continue to look once you get hired... And there is almost always opportunity to move up from a starting position if you show then what you've got.

I highly suggest getting some volunteer hours under your belt if you have the time... a couple days a week for a few weeks can do amazing things for your resume.

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followed my degree out of college,

went to the private sector first, then went public in my 2nd year

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Go to jigsaw.com, find a company that needs skills you have, find the person that actually makes the decisions, then offer to take the mid-level supervisor/manager to lunch for free.

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I made my luck. I got an education, chose a career that is short of qualified people, spent years becoming the best in my field, joined and became very active in my professional associations*, became president of several organizations over the years, had a personality that people like and trust. I never stopped learning and improving my skills. *My current position I was told about by an acquaintance in my professional organization. Before taking it, I made sure it was where I wanted to work and with whom I wanted to work. Education gives one choices.

I don't mean this to be bragging, it is just what I did and it worked. My dad once said to me, "You were lucky to get that job." I replied, "I made my luck." Now you can look up my age.

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Its allot about who you know, not what you know these days. I got an internship while i finished up my Junior and Senior years at college by someone from my church who put in my resume. When I was ready to graduate, same thing happened with the job that I have now; someone i knew from church put my resume in, I got an interview, and then had an offer a week after gradation. Been there ever since :)

I hope that I can be that person that someone "knows" and return the favor.

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I made my luck. I got an education, chose a career that is short of qualified people, spent years becoming the best in my field, joined and became very active in my professional associations*, became president of several organizations over the years, had a personality that people like and trust. I never stopped learning and improving my skills. *My current position I was told about by an acquaintance in my professional organization. Before taking it, I made sure it was where I wanted to work and with whom I wanted to work. Education gives one choices.

I've worked professionally at a national steakhouse restaurant chain for 0ver 10 years now. My current job is with a family style restaurant here in western PA. I'm happy with the pay, and can afford pretty much anything I need or want. But, on the happiness scale, it's a whole different story. I got this job by searching Monster. I applied, interviewed, and was hired in less than 30 days. Nice pay increase, and OK benefits. Funny thing is that it is the same job as I had, only not so pleasant of a working environment.

So, when I read your posts and looked at your age, I realized you, Darlene, hit the nail right on the head! I have only received my associates degree from a local community college. When I was 20 I thought, "this was all I'd ever need to succeed." Well, I was dead wrong. After 10 years, I realized something needed to change. I lost 100 pounds in 4 months back in 2008(before getting my current job)... I thought the new life style and new job were enough, but it wasn't. Yea I'm pretty successful at my job, but you know what, my personal life and my sanity is so much more important than the crazy life the restaurant gave me. So I went and joined the National Guard at the age of 34. I went through Basic Training on my 35th birthday.

My goal was two-fold... 1)Do something that I'd never done but had always wanted to do. 2) Go back to college full time and finish my Human Resources degree. Well, as of tomorrow 1/6/2011, and after setting a plan in motion nearly 2 years ago; I'm stepping down as a manager and becoming a full time college student. I'll only be working the weekends (thanks to the Army's GI Bill, tuition benefits, and owning a rental property.) which allows me plenty of time to study.

So Darlene, I'd also like to say that my "future success" will not be luck. It will grow from having a plan, putting that plan into motion, setting goals, and not fearing my life's direction. I enjoy luck when I receive it. But, I truly have always made my own luck.

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As aluded to in my prior post, and pointed out by Paul, "It is who you know," is also correct. That's where being active in professional associations really get you noticed. Once you get on a committe, then on the board of directors of your prof. association, then you suddenly have credibility, people notice you, and opportunity comes a knocking. Professional associations often have job bulletin boards.

To look for work with the federal government, go to http://www.usajobs.gov there are lots and lots of jobs posted there. You may have to move, but it is employment.

If one is in a type of work that may not have a professional association, then look to joining the chamber of commerce, being an active volunteer where the type of people volunteer that you would want to try to work for. Being active in Church groups, special interest groups, things like that will help you get noticed. If you have any influential friends that can introduce you to those people you want to seek employment from, ask them to do so. Get yourself invited to parties, and for heavens sake, if you have to drink, don't drink but a small amount of alcohol, you have to make a good impression.

If all else fails, start your own business! you have skills, think about what you can do with them.

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I would agree with a few points... education opens doors, but networking gets your though the door.

I get several job offers a year, from all over the place. I even had a head hunter working very hard to get me to take a job.

Kent

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I even had a head hunter working very hard to get me to take a job.

My first employer recruited right on campus. Most colleges have job fairs and on-site recruitment for their graduating students. My second job was also a headhunter, who got me in the door and after a year, I was made a permanent employee (wow - that was 14+ years ago). I agree that most of the time, it is who you know. Employers are really looking for recommendations. I would also say shorter resumes are better than longer (the latter typically indicates a job hopper).

If any of these look good, I would be happy to put in your resume: http://myportal.infor.com/hr/careers/

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Went to college, tried to work in that field but could not get my foot in the door. So i got a job with my Father in Law as an apprentice and less then 10 years later I am running 40 Million dollar jobs for a worldwide construction company and stayed working(Thank god) through all this. I wouldn't say this was lucky either, took 10 years to get here and it can be taken away very very quickly, it also takes a lot of "keeping up" due to different codes and such.

Mike

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