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JHolmes

Where Can I Buy Glycerin?

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Hello friends!

On the "How Do I" section of Planet Christmas I read an article about making your own fog juice.

I'm trying to find the materials but am having no luck.

Where does one buy glycerin?

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Hello friends!

On the "How Do I" section of Planet Christmas I read an article about making your own fog juice.

I'm trying to find the materials but am having no luck.

Where does one buy glycerin?

I got mine at Walgreens, but most drug stores should have it.

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How much can you buy before the DHS puts you on a watch list? :o

Very true :P

Well, I'll invite the Feds to come see the show :)

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I know you can buy it by the gallon at a local restaurant supply company near me.

FYI, I've read a few posts on Haunt Forum about making your own fog juice, and I believe many people have said to just buy Froggy's Fog Juice. Don't bother making it. You'll have better success if you buy fog juice from a company that has proven their products.

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JHolmes: you are starting to use the terms fog and haze interchangeably. They are not the same. Also, be sure to check the compatibility chart on the Froggy's Fog site, as the above link is for haze fluid, not fog fluid, as in your original question. These two terms refer to two very different effects.

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JHolmes: you are starting to use the terms fog and haze interchangeably. They are not the same. Also, be sure to check the compatibility chart on the Froggy's Fog site, as the above link is for haze fluid, not fog fluid, as in your original question. These two terms refer to two very different effects.

You are right :)

I already knew this but considering we are working in an outdoor environment was unsure of which would best suit my needs.

Thanks for letting me know though :)

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Oh, and the other problem that has been mentioned with homemade fog juice is that it tends to gum up the fogger.

I can definitely DITTO that :mad2:

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You should be able to find glycerin at any drug store.

Walmart sales it in the pharmacy section, so does Target, try one of those

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You are right :)

I already knew this but considering we are working in an outdoor environment was unsure of which would best suit my needs.

Thanks for letting me know though :)

You are going to want HAZE juice and a Haze machine for the outdoors. Haze is generally what is used for enhancing lighting effects (ie. concerts, etc.) as it creates...a haze and not a billowing/wispy cloud. One thing to consider though, is the fact that you are using it outdoors, unless the wind is COMPLETELY calm, haze/fog/chilled-fog is not going to be sticking around much at all! So, you are going to end up pumping that stuff out CONSTANTLY! Send me a PM if you don't want to divulge anything on here, and I can give you my two-cents worth!

Edited by disney-fan-reborn

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You are going to want HAZE juice and a Haze machine for the outdoors. Haze is generally what is used for enhancing lighting effects (ie. concerts, etc.) as it creates...a haze and not a billowing/wispy cloud. One thing to consider though, is the fact that you are using it outdoors, unless the wind is COMPLETELY calm, haze/fog/chilled-fog is not going to be sticking around much at all! So, you are going to end up pumping that stuff out CONSTANTLY! Send me a PM if you don't want to divulge anything on here, and I can give you my two-cents worth!

Nothing about not wantint go divulge here :)!

We actually talked and decided that neither haze nor fog is in the budget for this production.

We are going to make do with shining our intelligent lights onto the white pillars in front of the house.

Check out our facebook page for photos :)

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Im not gonna hop on the froggys wagon for few reasons. First why pay a premium amount plus shipping when you can goto spencers at the mall and its just as good i have been using for years and years and i have no complaints. Key to great fog is all in the fogger and a great chiller(straight through design without a tunnel) When you think about it when your outside in the elements with drafts and breeze etc your not going to be able to tell the difference in fog juice i will promise you that one gust of wind and its all the same thing GONE! Like it was mentioned before dont even bother making own fog juice its not even worth it....Keep it simple. Oh one thing to remember though when buying fog juice always read labels a few years back a few drug stores were selling stuff that was not safe to breath in at all! Im sure they didnt know or maybe the fog juice was a miss print but when it reads like automotiove coolant thats not a wise thing to risk. Dont get me wrong here if froggys was free to ship and same price or cheaper i would go froggys. Until i can buy froggys local its just not gonna happen...

Edited by FrostNsnow

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I can definitely DITTO that :mad2:

Yes, it sure does. And it can not only gum it up, it can also CLOG the nozzles causing the fogger to possibly overheat and catch fire.

Something you really don't want to do or have happen!

So if you do make your own fluid, keep a constant eye on your fogger!

Better yet, but pre-made fogger fluid, you will definitely be better off and much safer.

Another tip that some don't seem to do either.

After you've used your fogger and the juice has been used up, clean out the foggers juice chamber by running distilled water through the fogger, maybe add a tablesppon of vinegar in with it. These will keep your nozzles clean and clear and give you maximum output from your machine. I clean mine after each use (every time the fluid is used up, I run this mixture through my foggers), they are still working and going strong today and my foggers are all over 10 years old now, except for one, and it's 8 years old..

So keep your fog machines cleaned out for best performance and long life!

Edited by LOR-CF

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Never let it run dry and always store with fluid in the tank for the pumps benefit. So when you start up the next time its not running dry. I have heard about the distilled water and vinegar things but i have never done and never had a problem. I guess it just depends on the juice your using and what type of fogger your using. I never heard of a fogger lastin 10 years before but i have had mine for about 6 years(and every year they run hard) so i guess it just depends on the quality. I know most of the cheap ones you get maybe 3 years tops.

Edited by FrostNsnow

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Never let it run dry and always store with fluid in the tank for the pumps benefit. So when you start up the next time its not running dry. I have heard about the distilled water and vinegar things but i have never done and never had a problem. I guess it just depends on the juice your using and what type of fogger your using. I never heard of a fogger lastin 10 years before but i have had mine for about 6 years(and every year they run hard) so i guess it just depends on the quality. I know most of the cheap ones you get maybe 3 years tops.

The instructions with my foggers state to DRY OUT the fluid tank before storing or damage could occur. Fog fluid itself is a bit slimy and sticky, I wouldn't leave it in my foggers, mainly for fear leaving it would clog the machine when brought out of storage for its next run.

And my 10+ year old foggers, well guess what they are, yep, WAL-MART $15-$20 fog machines.

And I run mine hard too, sometimes not every night, they run from 5pm until they run out of juice, which usually is around 1am or thereabout, then they get cleaned, dried and packed after the last run on the last night. I also use them at Christmas sometimes too.

These foggers have well over 5,000+ hours on them. Still work like they were brand new. Even still look brand new! .

Edited by LOR-CF

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Yeah it keeps the o-rings in the pumps lubed up so they dont get rot. I have the f/x lite ones and they havent let me down yet. I think its the past few years they just dont build things like they used to. Geez i sound like my parents lol buts it true its getting worse and worse...everything winds up being throw away.

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Oh one thing to remember though when buying fog juice always read labels a few years back a few drug stores were selling stuff that was not safe to breath in at all! Im sure they didnt know or maybe the fog juice was a miss print but when it reads like automotiove coolant thats not a wise thing to risk.

Over the years glycol based fog fluid had been shunned in lieu of other formulations, but it's been more than 10 years since I've read the actor's union statement on the use of "airborne media" for fog and haze effects (A colleague of mine was one of the co-authors, if not a consultant on the project, if memory serves.) I'll poke around and see if I can find the specifics. IMHO--the whole thing was a bit alarmist, but when you are in a closed environment (aka performance space) night after night, then exposure does become a concern.. Much like the cumulative effect of loud working environments in relation to both temporary and permanent hearing loss. Barring further research, outdoor use shouldn't be a concern, unless you are sitting at the jet of a fog machine, for hours/days at a time. But this was a hotbed of emotionally-charged controversy for years in legit theater. And actors do tend to be a rather high-maintenance lot, so I took that into consideration at the time.

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