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Orville Fugitte

Adding Concrete In Base Of A Blowmold To Keep It In Place?

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I got to thinking of all my blowmolds I own and having to try and tie them down in some fashion sometimes just isn't possible. So I got this crazy notion thinking about how or if I could actually add concrete to the bottom of a blowmold to hold it in place.

I'd leave "holes" in the concrete so water that got inside could still get out, but I was just wondering if anyone has ever tried doing this to a blowmold and how it worked out.

I was also thinking it would help make a good theft deterrent as well because now the BM would have some weight to it and be more difficult for someone to walk off with.

The reason I am asking about this is we had to move from our house to an apartment and I have had to cut back my display from 80 to 48 channels due to space linitations. I'd still like to use my blowmolds in my display, but I need a way to set them up pretty much as stand-alones since I can't use my platforms at the apartment. Hopefully I'll get back into a house in the near future, but even so, I'm still thinking this may be a good idea for myself.

Yes, I know, the "what if you want to sell the BM later?", well, I have no intention of ever selling them, they will be passed on to younger family members when I move on the next plane of existence from this planet and what they do with them will be entirely up to them.

So is this concrete idea even feasible? Would it be difficult to do? Any other recommendations for securing blowmolds where they couldn't just blow or "walk" away out of my display while living in an apartment?

Thanks for your repsonses and insights on how to protect my growing BlowMold investment from just "disappearing".

Edited by LOR-CF

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I have one mold that is filled with concrete, it is heavy and it is not going anyplace without

someone helping it. I purchased it from a gentleman who lived right on the Puget Sound,

and they would get a lot of wind, coming in off the water.

Actually it is the elf with sign mold. I think it

weighs about 15-20 pounds. I am just careful, not to hit it against anything hard.

I am not sure I would recommend it, but these are your molds, if you are not worried

about resale, I would think about it just like repaints, you make them unique to

your display and what works for you.

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I have one mold that is filled with concrete, it is heavy and it is not going anyplace without

someone helping it. I purchased it from a gentleman who lived right on the Puget Sound,

and they would get a lot of wind, coming in off the water.

Actually it is the elf with sign mold. I think it

weighs about 15-20 pounds. I am just careful, not to hit it against anything hard.

I am not sure I would recommend it, but these are your molds, if you are not worried

about resale, I would think about it just like repaints, you make them unique to

your display and what works for you.

Deeny, how thick is the concrete in that BM you have?

I was thinking about a 1" to possibly 2"(maybe 3" at most) thick concrete in the base area. just enough to weigh it down and hopefully heavy enough to keep them from easily walking away. I've got a garden statue that weighs about 35-40 pounds (possibly 50) and I know that sucker is so heavy I have to transport him on a dolly when I need or want to move him. Don't want to weigh the BM's down too much, mainly so I don't end up having the bottoms burst or fall out from the concrete in the bottom. Will probably only move them by dolly when the time comes to put them out and put them away so that doesn't happen.

But may happen if someone trys to just pick one of them up and walk off with it(them). Probably give them a big surprise too. LOL

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I would worry about the weight on the plastic causing damage.

As blow molds age, the plastic weakens and I would think that the added weight would cause damage to the blow mold over time.

I haven't tried it but I know that I have some older blow molds that have had rocks in the bottom and those are ones that always seem to get holes or cracks in them. My other old blow molds that never had rocks in them seem to hold up much better.

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I have one mold that is filled with concrete, it is heavy and it is not going anyplace without

someone helping it. I purchased it from a gentleman who lived right on the Puget Sound,

and they would get a lot of wind, coming in off the water.

Actually it is the elf with sign mold. I think it

weighs about 15-20 pounds. I am just careful, not to hit it against anything hard.

I am not sure I would recommend it, but these are your molds, if you are not worried

about resale, I would think about it just like repaints, you make them unique to

your display and what works for you.

Might try sand in plastic bags...

Out neighbour does this makes them real heavy yet you can poke a hole in the bag and drain the sand later.

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Might try sand in plastic bags...

Out neighbour does this makes them real heavy yet you can poke a hole in the bag and drain the sand later.

Paul, didn't even think of using sand (and I'm sure I have probably even read that somewhere before too...DOH! LOL).

That sounds to be a possible better solution than concrete. As I don't want to damage the blowmolds, just make them a lot more difficult to walk off.

Thanks for the suggestion, I do believe that your sand idea is the one I will definitely implement!

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I used a workout weight tie wrapped on mine then last year used ziplock bags with sand in them.Use the slide lock bags to make the job easier.

The only CON for blowmolds is the light weight of them.The reason why I didn't buy them in the past but the cuteness of them won out & I now own over 100 of them lol

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Sand in the bags would definatly help with storage, the concrete in the one I have is about 6

inches deep

. Now I think about it, it sure would have been a mess to get it in there, but like

he told me, he was trying to prevent them from blowing away, I guess it didnt work so well

because he sold them to me!....

I always enjoying discovering the items that have been used to weigh them down, usually

it is sand or a rock but other times it has been a weight for a weight bench, or a bunch of

nails.

Edited by Deeny Dine

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if you want to use it just a season or two go for it. The concrete will rip the bottom out eventually and you definantly won't get a dime if you decide to resale.

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I use sandbags in most of my blowmolds, particularly the Nativity ones, and I even leave them in while being stored. They keep the molds weighed down, and no potential thief will try to take something that heavy.

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Here's another idea I thought about too, taking those large stepping stones, not sure what shape to call them, but they have a large flat side(bottom) and basically have 6 sides in total and would look like a drawing of a house. all sides are flat. Don't have one to take a photo of at the moment, they are all in storage at the moment.

But they would allow smaller blowmolds like my pumpkin head boo ghosts to sit on top of them. So I was thinking maybe some straight brackets mounted to the BM with screws through the bottom of the BM and the exposed section of the straight brackets could be screwed directly to the stone with masonry screws. Tbis would give the BM some weight and hold it in place, but be easily removable with the use of a screw driver or socket set, depending on the screw head type used. Plus this would do very little damage to the BM by adding 4 to 8 small screw holes up through the bottom of the BM as well, where they wouldn't be noticable.

I know they have larger stepping stones that this could also work with the larger BM's as well.

I would think with the right amount of screws and long enough screws to prevent having the BM just pulled off and free from the brackets abd screws, that this could possibly work as a nice solution for both keeping the BM in place and from theft.

Anyone ever try this method? If so, how well did it work? Or didn't it?

Edited by LOR-CF

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Here's another idea I thought about too, taking those large stepping stones, not sure what shape to call them, but they have a large flat side(bottom) and basically have 6 sides in total and would look like a drawing of a house. all sides are flat. Don't have one to take a photo of at the moment, they are all in storage at the moment.

But they would allow smaller blowmolds like my pumpkin head boo ghosts to sit on top of them. So I was thinking maybe some straight brackets mounted to the BM with screws through the bottom of the BM and the exposed section of the straight brackets could be screwed directly to the stone with masonry screws. Tbis would give the BM some weight and hold it in place, but be easily removable with the use of a screw driver or socket set, depending on the screw head type used. Plus this would do very little damage to the BM by adding 4 to 8 small screw holes up through the bottom of the BM as well, where they wouldn't be noticable.

I know they have larger stepping stones that this could also work with the larger BM's as well.

I would think with the right amount of screws and long enough screws to prevent having the BM just pulled off and free from the brackets abd screws, that this could possibly work as a nice solution for both keeping the BM in place and from theft.

Anyone ever try this method? If so, how well did it work? Or didn't it?

I like your idea. Sounds like that would work pretty well.

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I think I'm going to try and test that stepping stone/straight bracket method out when I get a chance to get to storage and get one of the stones out and see how well it will work. Will take some pics of the process from start to finish to see how it all works out. I'm thinking this will be the best way to do this without any real damage to the BM, well, unless you try and pick it up before removing the stone underneath. :blink:

May have to paint the stones black so they disappear into the night which will make the blowmold mounted to it sort of look like it's hovering a few inches above the ground. So for ghost BM's this could work out to be a really awesome effect for Halloween use!

Edited by LOR-CF

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I think I'm going to try and test that stepping stone/straight bracket method out when I get a chance to get to storage and get one of the stones out and see how well it will work. Will take some pics of the process from start to finish to see how it all works out. I'm thinking this will be the best way to do this without any real damage to the BM, well, unless you try and pick it up before removing the stone underneath. :blink:

May have to paint the stones black so they disappear into the night which will make the blowmold mounted to it sort of look like it's hovering a few inches above the ground. So for ghost BM's this could work out to be a really awesome effect for Halloween use!

The flat brackets will work just fine. I use them on all my molds screwed to the bottom. I do not use the stones. I just stake mine down through the bracket holes. I use four brackets per mold, two in front and two in back. Works great. I remove the brackets before I store the molds.

I don't see why it wouldn't work with stones also.

Edited by razlfratz

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The flat brackets will work just fine. I use them on all my molds screwed to the bottom. I do not use the stones. I just stake mine down through the bracket holes. I use four brackets per mold, two in front and two in back. Works great. I remove the brackets before I store the molds.

I don't see why it wouldn't work with stones also.

Chuck,

Any chance that you have a pic of the bottom of one of your molds with the brackets attached? It definitely sounds like something I would like to do, but I am having trouble visualizing it.

The idea with the stepping stones sounds interesting also, but I think the brackets would be sufficient for my purposes.

Thanks,

Kathi

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Yeah, I'm a visual person too, so pictures sure help me out. I guess we're all looking for new and different ways of securely mounting/displaying our molds.

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