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Stunkist

Running Wires Through Windows

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Greetings All,

I have a few spots where it will be easier to plug in a controller inside through a window rather than in the yard. My question is this: Do they make some kind of insulation that would kind of "self seal" around the wires running through the gap in the window and allow me to put the window down against it and somewhat seal the gap from the elements? I'm thinking there has to be something that I can cut in a block to the shape of the bottom of the window pane that I could just slice halfway up the height, kinda bend it to open it a little, slide the cords through there and when I "un-bend" it, it will just suck itself around the cord and basically retain the block shape, allowing me to simply lower the window on top of it and squish it down. I hope that makes sense....Any help/experiences/suggestions will be greatly appreciated.....

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You must live in a warm area!

In the winter I don't want ANY openings to the outside.

Couldn't you just run an extension cord to the controller?

I have seen something on TV that fits under a door to keep drafts out.

63898x.jpg

http://www.plowhearth.com/product.asp?pcode=12408&cm%5Fmmc=Tagged%2D%5F%2DNA%2D%5F%2DNA%2D%5F%2DNA&cm%5Flm=&mr%3AreferralID=NA&mr%3AtrackingCode=NA&mid=&jb=&u=&l=&j=&e=&r=nextag&p=12408

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I did this with just a rolled up towel and heavy tape.

If you are looking for something more "block-like" as in your post above, I would suggest insulating wallboard from your local big box hardware store (I use 1" thick stuff as a backer board for cutting out items).... or possibly even "floral foam" from your local arts/crafts store. Both of these could be easily cut and shaped to your window opening. But I would probably still seal it with tape to keep everything in place.

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I don't like the idea of compressing the cat 5 cable assuming your daisy chaining to other controllers, also an unlocked window if you leave for the evening.........I know there not cheep but if your usnig LOR controllers you could consider their light linkers that way all the controllers could stay outside..........The extra gas or what ever way you heat your home the heat loss in Dec. might pay for a set. Just my 2 cents

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Why not just run a wire through the wall? Mount a jack on either side. Unless you have brick siding, it is not that difficult.

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Towels work pretty darn good down in South Georgia. It doesn't let in the cold at all.

You could cut a piece of 10 mil coroplast to fit the window with a cutout for where the wires go.

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I've used super-flat CAT5 cables for the last two years and they work great. The window will completely close around the cable, performance isn't impaired, and there are no drafts.

Get it here: http://www.vpi.us/cable-sf.html

FWIW: I live in Indiana - it get's nippy here in December.

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I have used the following system for the last 6 years in Michigan Winters with absolutely no issues and no drafts.

I have sliding windows that slide in tracks. I cut lengths of firring strips to be slightly less than the height of the window itself. One board is slightly shorter than the other to allow for the cords to run through.

I took foam rubber door seal avail at LOWES that had a sticky surface on one side and ran a length around the whole assemly of the 2 boards that were screwed together as in the pic. (the additional board, a 1"X1", in the pic comes into play later.)

The firring strip/foam rubber assembly then slides vertically into the slot where the window normally recesses into in the window frame. In my case...it is a snug fit as the firring strips are the same width of my windows.

The cords are run through the open window INSIDE the space formed by the firring strip assembly.

The firring strip assembly is then pushed all the way in against the window frame with the cord in place. The foam rubber forms around and seals against the cord.

The window is then closed against the firring strip assembly to hold it in place and seals against drafts.

That extra peice of wood in the first pic is for "locking" my window. As the window no longer closes fully becasue of the firring strip assembly being inside the window track. To keep the window from being opened by "unfriendlies" I lay the second board inside the track where the window slides in. This basically locks my window closed.

When all said and done, I have multiple cords running through the slot formed by the firring strip assembly and a secure and draft free window. Again..... has worked great for 6 seasons now.

Doug

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Thanks everyone....as usual, many great ideas! Always appreciated! :) And just to explain further for those who had questions, I have two upstairs windows. I plan on plugging the power cords to one controller through 1 of them over the front porch so that I don't have cords hanging down from the roof....and the second I'm running the extension cords from a few light strings into my office, where my show computer will be set up. No Cat 5 worries as I will use a Linker for the porch controller and simply connect the office controller directly to the computer....then to my main linker. Thanks again!

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I just use foam tape from HD or Lowes. You can get the wide stuff and run it the entire width of the window. As always though, cut a stick to prop the window closed for security.

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I have used the following system for the last 6 years in Michigan Winters with absolutely no issues and no drafts.

I have sliding windows that slide in tracks. I cut lengths of firring strips to be slightly less than the height of the window itself. One board is slightly shorter than the other to allow for the cords to run through.

2011-08-05_00-38-12_18.jpg

I took foam rubber door seal avail at LOWES that had a sticky surface on one side and ran a length around the whole assemly of the 2 boards that were screwed together as in the pic. (the additional board, a 1"X1", in the pic comes into play later.)

2011-08-05_00-38-28_279.jpg

The firring strip/foam rubber assembly then slides vertically into the slot where the window normally recesses into in the window frame. In my case...it is a snug fit as the firring strips are the same width of my windows.

2011-08-05_00-40-45_443.jpg

The cords are run through the open window INSIDE the space formed by the firring strip assembly.

2011-08-05_00-40-58_115.jpg

The firring strip assembly is then pushed all the way in against the window frame with the cord in place. The foam rubber forms around and seals against the cord.

2011-08-05_00-41-17_119.jpg

The window is then closed against the firring strip assembly to hold it in place and seals against drafts.

2011-08-05_00-41-30_630.jpg

That extra peice of wood in the first pic is for "locking" my window. As the window no longer closes fully becasue of the firring strip assembly being inside the window track. To keep the window from being opened by "unfriendlies" I lay the second board inside the track where the window slides in. This basically locks my window closed.

2011-08-05_00-41-47_505.jpg

When all said and done, I have multiple cords running through the slot formed by the firring strip assembly and a secure and draft free window. Again..... has worked great for 6 seasons now.

2011-08-05_00-41-58_279.jpg

Doug

Edited by Senior

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So sorry for the double posing of this. I am experimenting with Photobucket to manange my attachments.

Will not happen again.

Doug

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I was thinking of something like this but only to cut down on the number of extension cords I was using. Great pics and how tos. Thanks for making my wallet a little lighter. LOL

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I just use foam tape from HD or Lowes. You can get the wide stuff and run it the entire width of the window. As always though, cut a stick to prop the window closed for security.

I have also used the foam insulation for water pipe. You can compress it a lot and have a good seal.

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