Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
chuckiii

Ideas For Running Lights On The Ground Across A Street?

Recommended Posts

Does anyone have any ideas for how to run lights on the ground across a street so they won't break?

A couple of Ideas I have are:

Acrylic Sheets: Run sheets of acrylic with channels cut into it. Seems like this will be very expensive

Acrylic tubes: I think these will get knocked around and might not be as strong as just cutting channels.

Sheets of plywood: Similar to the acrylic idea but flipped so that the channel is exposed to the cars. Would Need to make sure the channel is deep enough so that when the cars drive over it the tires do not impact the lights. The problem with this is that the light would be very directional and not spread out.

Any other ideas?!?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cant go over top? I'd be hesitant going across a public road. Do you live where it snows? Those plows would tear anything you put down up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re read the first post.

He wants to have actual lights in the street, otherwise he would not be considering acrylic as a material.

No ideas yet.

Tell up more of what the purpose is and we may come up with something.

Knowing your location/weather(cold/rain/snow) would also help.

JOel

Edited by jrock64

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No snow... private road in HOA... I want people to be able to see the lights going across the street. It's for a river effect. For the past few years we have done it on one side of the road across three yards. This year I'm trying to get some neighbors across the road to join in on the river.white-house-christmas.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fiber optic pushed through plywood. You could cut a channel for the cables and have the ends poking through. The problem with anything will be durability. It will have to withstand a tremendous amount of punishment being driving over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it might be against the law in most places to run anything electrical across a roadway. You might want to check with your code enforcement to be sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you would need to fabricate a steel frame, and use polycarbonate sheet recessed within the frame so it isn't carrying the load of the cars driving over it. Then you can run blue rope light or whatever through the framework without risk of damaging the lights and causing a short.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you would need to fabricate a steel frame, and use polycarbonate sheet recessed within the frame so it isn't carrying the load of the cars driving over it. Then you can run blue rope light or whatever through the framework without risk of damaging the lights and causing a short.

This is what I was thinking too. Build a frame of steel, then you can run the lights under/through it. You could even use structrual "expanded steel" if you need to expose more lighting area in between frame supports.

Despite the weight the frame would entail, I would think if any trucks/utility vans/delivery trucks/etc run over it, then it will still require substantial anchoring on the ends to prevent movement.

Would it be easier to use blue flood lights shining on the road at the crossing point? You could use "shutters" to focus the light better. Of course it would not have quite the

"wow" factor....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would need to have a textured surface. If you used an acrylic or even plywood, when it become wet, it would be slick. That would create a road hazard.

You should look at how they use expanded sheet metal on a bridge. Figuratively and literally, that is what you are building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...or build bridge railing on either side of the street to look like they are driving over the river. A bit of paint (if allowed) on the street can make it look like wooden planks. Glow in the dark paint for the river is another idea. Although the flood light idea has possibilities too.

Actual lights on the road - too many issues you don't need keeping you up at night worrying about.

Edited by Tim Bateson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Off the subject, but how did you get the lights in the tree tops in your picture? String them up and down individual branches or did you use some type of net lighting?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're going to run the risk of going across a road, buy a commercial cable protector. One of the ones we use at work is Low Profile Bumble Bee. I know they're pricey but they're specifically designed for cross roads, etc while protecting the cables and vehicles / people.

Here is a link from a quick google search: http://www.probroadcastsupply.com/products/Bumble-Bee-BB1%252d075-Low-Profile-Cable-Protector-for-Easy-Crossing-BB1%252d075.html

The manufacturer is here: http://www.yjams.com/

v/r

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're going to run the risk of going across a road, buy a commercial cable protector. One of the ones we use at work is Low Profile Bumble Bee. I know they're pricey but they're specifically designed for cross roads, etc while protecting the cables and vehicles / people.

Here is a link from a quick google search: http://www.probroadcastsupply.com/products/Bumble-Bee-BB1%252d075-Low-Profile-Cable-Protector-for-Easy-Crossing-BB1%252d075.html

The manufacturer is here: http://www.yjams.com/

v/r

Chris

He wants the lights to be visible as they cross the street (so it looks like the river is crossing the road), so such protectors won't allow that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about using a projector placed low on the ground next to the road pointing onto the road to give the illusion that the lights are on the street itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about this.

Take a 2x6, oak or maybe composite material. Pine would probably not hold up.

knock both sides down to a 40 degree angle.

Route a small channel 1/2 in wide by 1/2 in deep in both faces.

Place a 5050 strip in each channel, think single color, single channel CCR strip without the protective jacket.

Place the strip in the channels and cover with a cleat epoxy, furniture glassing compound.

Now that I actually see the layout, 3/8in ropelight would also work.

Light would come out both faces , but not much larger than a speed bump.

Joel

post-2290-0-70419200-1322546789.jpg

Edited by jrock64

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - a really quick and easy way to do this - bar grating! Bar grating is load rated by the square foot and is tied at the top and not the bottom, which would allow rope lighting to pass through the channels and can easily withstand the weight of a car. You can get a serrated version of it as well for better traction. Check out the McMaster-Carr Catalog:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#bar-grating/=f77xz5

Because it wouldn't be flush you could also weld a small lip/ramp to either side of it to allow cars to pass over it more easily. I believe it would likely work without the "ramps" (you wouldn't need anything higher than 1") but better safe than sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you willing to assume the liability if anything goes wrong? For example, a child trips and chips a tooth. In no universe would this be a good idea.

I admire the spirit, but sometimes things should be left alone. This is a bad idea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's liability to everything. If you buy a German Shepard your home owner's insurance goes up. If you help someone who's been hurt they can sue you for administering cpr wrong. What if the mailman cuts through your yard and trips on an extension cord going to your lights? No more light shows either? If they give you permission in your gated community to do this - go for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you help someone who's been hurt they can sue you for administering cpr wrong.

Off topic, but most states have laws exempting this liability. It's sometimes referred to as the Good Samaritan law. Same applies if you pull someone from a burning car, but paralyze them in the process....so help people if they need it, they can't sue you if you are well-intended and use good judgement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's liability to everything. If you buy a German Shepard your home owner's insurance goes up. If you help someone who's been hurt they can sue you for administering cpr wrong. What if the mailman cuts through your yard and trips on an extension cord going to your lights? No more light shows either? If they give you permission in your gated community to do this - go for it.

There is a difference between something happening in your yard and something going across a public street. Does the OP have permission to do this, I didn't notice? If that is the case then the whole community should take responsibility if something happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...