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Rgb Strings (not Pixel-level Addressable)


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I've been thinking of jumping into some RGB next year, but I havn't seen a lot of info on what I would like to do:

What I'm thinking of would be full strings of RGB nodes, but instead of individually controllable pixels, you would power the whole string. I'm assuming it would be 4 wires, with a seperate line for R, G, and B, so that you could fade each color with an LOR DC board or something similar.

Has anyone done this, or seen hardware that would support it?

I'd be looking for the RGB strings themselves (in any length/pixel count), and then some sort of power supply that could handle probably about 3000 nodes spread over 15 channels of DC. So, around 600 R, G, or B LEDs on each of 15 channels, with the possibility that all 9000 could be on at once to make white.

I'd like to stay away from the pixel-level control for now, just to avoid the DMX hardware for another year or 2, and make the programming much simpler.

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the modules that Holiday Coro, Cheap DMX, etc sell could also be controlled by an LOR DC board. Check out the RGB videos that David Moore Did and you will see plenty of examples of the types of strings/modules you are referring to. You would simply use 3 channels on an LOR DC board to control each string.

The problem you'll run into with powering them is that you will have to re-inject power every so often. I've not worked with these types of strings yet (only pixel control) to know what you can/can't do there.

3,000 nodes is a lot to power from one supply.

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You can find the RGB LED in 5 meter rolls on EBAY for about 25.00, you will have to do your own control work unless your just going for basic 3 colors and white. you can basically get 9 colors by turning on red/blue etc at same time but for the million colors you need controller. Most are 12 volt and use less than 2 amp for the entire 15 feet.. usually have 5050 SMD or 3528 SMD type leds on them, 2 most popular are 150 leds and 300 leds per 5 meters.

I'm new here but I do ahve alot of exp with RGB on cars and motorcycles and have built my own controller for them to do the colors I wanted but have not moved it past the stand alone function phase yet.

for $ 25.00 go get ya roll of them and play around you can cut them every 3 LEDS and not risk blowing a whole 5 meter roll..

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I've been thinking of jumping into some RGB next year, but I havn't seen a lot of info on what I would like to do:

What I'm thinking of would be full strings of RGB nodes, but instead of individually controllable pixels, you would power the whole string. I'm assuming it would be 4 wires, with a seperate line for R, G, and B, so that you could fade each color with an LOR DC board or something similar.

Has anyone done this, or seen hardware that would support it?

I'd be looking for the RGB strings themselves (in any length/pixel count), and then some sort of power supply that could handle probably about 3000 nodes spread over 15 channels of DC. So, around 600 R, G, or B LEDs on each of 15 channels, with the possibility that all 9000 could be on at once to make white.

I'd like to stay away from the pixel-level control for now, just to avoid the DMX hardware for another year or 2, and make the programming much simpler.

Sticky

It's not quite as simple in the RGB world, you are unlikely to find an off the shelf strings that you could run 3000 Nodes off 15 channels.

Even the 50 count string @5V that Jon linked are not really the solution if your wanting that many LED's as 3000 nodes, ie 60 strings would have a total current draw (for white) of around 180A at 5V

Mind you 2801 pixels will have the same current requirement.

12V or 24V flexible strip may be you best solution

PS the link that fasteddy posted will give you access to lot's of RGB info

Cheers

Aussiphil

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I've been thinking of jumping into some RGB next year, but I havn't seen a lot of info on what I would like to do:

What I'm thinking of would be full strings of RGB nodes, but instead of individually controllable pixels, you would power the whole string. I'm assuming it would be 4 wires, with a seperate line for R, G, and B, so that you could fade each color with an LOR DC board or something similar.

Has anyone done this, or seen hardware that would support it?

I'd be looking for the RGB strings themselves (in any length/pixel count), and then some sort of power supply that could handle probably about 3000 nodes spread over 15 channels of DC. So, around 600 R, G, or B LEDs on each of 15 channels, with the possibility that all 9000 could be on at once to make white.

I'd like to stay away from the pixel-level control for now, just to avoid the DMX hardware for another year or 2, and make the programming much simpler.

I'd recommend watching the RGB video series to start with:

http://www.holidaycoro.com/kb_results.asp?ID=15

It contains TONS of examples and is a great primer to get you started. If you would rather have someone assist you with all the issues involved (power distribution, sourcing, controllers, etc) just let us know - we can provide hands on advice:

http://www.holidaycoro.com/category-s/1858.htm

We've got lots of RGB experience and can guide you through all the question you have and save you a ton of time. Of course we also sell a variety of RGB hardware.

Thanks,

David

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wow, how do simple questions escape simply being answered? Phil was the only one close to actually answering the original question.

Stickybombs: Yes, you can drive RGB pixel strings using LOR controllers. Quite well, in fact, as the LOR DC controller makes a very reasonable, well supported 16 channel PWM controller that works with both LOR and DMX protocols. However, as Phil pointed out there are some load considerations to keep in mind.

Related to the LOR DC controller:

Each channel maxes out at 4A. So, theoretically you could run the RED pixels on string 1 out to about 200 nodes before maxing out the channel (assumes 20mA draw per each pixel component, 60mA total per LED when WHITE).

Since you'd use channel 2 for Green and channel 3 for Blue, that means that the same 200 node string would draw three times that amount, or 12A.

Your second string would use channels 4, 5, and 6 (R, G, B ), and for 200 nodes would consume another 12A.

Now you have a problem. Each bank on a LOR DC controller is rated at 20A max (Bank A is channels 1-8, bank B is channels 9-16). So if you turned on both 200 node strings to white, you'd be drawing 24A on channel bank A and would overload the controller.

The only way to ensure that you don't overload the channel bank is to reduce the number of nodes used per channel. Mapping the channels to the pixel strings as follows:

Bank Channel String Color

---- ------- ------ -----

A 1 1 R

A 2 1 G

A 3 1 B

A 4 2 R

A 5 2 G

A 6 2 B

A 7 3 R

A 8 3 G

B 9 3 B

B 10 4 R

B 11 4 G

B 12 4 B

B 13 5 R

B 14 5 G

B 15 5 B

B 16 NOT USED

In order to avoid overloading the channel banks (20A max each) in an "ALL NODES WHITE" condition you would have to have no more than 2.5A per channel. Bank A will carry more of a load than bank B (because you're only using 7 of 8 channels on bank B so bank A sets the pixel limit at 125 pixels per string (125 pixels * .02A/pixel color * 8 channels = 20A)

That would mean that one LOR DC controller can handle 625 pixels (5 strings of 125 pixels each) AT MAX RATED LOAD. You would also need some pretty beefy power supplies - at 12VDC, 40A is a 480 Watt OUTPUT. Input would obviously be higher, somewhere around 600 Watts.

So, for your 9000 pixel example you would need 15 controllers. At $100 per controller, that's about $6.67 per channel, or $20 per string, which isn't too shabby for that kind of capacity and concentration.

I hope this helps.

Fabian

Edited by GordonLights
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