Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Sign in to follow this  
csmith

How much current does a typical inflatable require?

Recommended Posts

Anybody ever put an ammeter on one of their inflatables? How much current does a typical one require? How many do you think could be put on a dedicated 20 amp circuit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I have never put a ammeter on one but according to Gemmy they don't use more then a string of lights. This is from another site as the same question came up so I am going to show you what one member found and shared.

The Gargoyle uses 0.73 amps at 120 volts. That means that you will use 87.6 watts per hour. The average light bulb uses either 60 or 100 watts per hour.

I hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The label on the plug for the gargoyles shows a demand of0.73 amps. The new QVC Carosel came in at or near 0.9 amps (not inlcluding the spots)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a copy of email I got last year from Gemmy when I asked this question.

Dear Valued Customer,

Thank you for your interest in our product! You did not say which sizes you have. I've listed several below for you.

Dear Valued Customer,

Thank you for your interest in our product! You did not say which sizes you have. I've listed several below for you.

4 ft 12 volt

0.43 amp

5.16 watt

6 ft 12 volt

0.48 amp

58.6 watt

8 ft 12 volt

0.66 amp

72.6 watt

12 ft.

0.71 amp

78 watts

Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that ! That is good to know on all the sizes! Chuck I think you have a winning answer with the dementedelf's!! Great Job!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm confused by the 12 volts in the post above. In my experience, only 4 foot inflatables use anything other than 120 volts...

-Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, it would appear they said "12" when they meant "120" (volts). Going through the calculations by assuming that either the Power or the Current are correct, I get the following numbers:

Assume the stated power is correct:

4 ft

120 Volts

51.6 Watts (they said it was 5.16 Watt -a typo?)

0.43 Amps

4 ft

12 Volts (would have a transformer supplying power)

5.16 Watts

0.43 Amps

6 ft

120 Volts

58.6 Watts

0.49 Amps

8 ft

120 Volts

72.6 Watts

0.61 Amps

12 ft.

120 Volts

78 Watts

0.65 Amps

Assume the stated current is correct:

4 ft

120 Volts

0.43 Amps

51.6 Watts

4 ft

12 Volts (would have a transformer supplying power)

0.43 Amps

5.16 Watts

6 ft

120 Volts

0.48 Amps

57.6 Watts

8 ft

120 Volts

0.66 Amps

79.2 Watts

12 ft

120 Volts

0.71 Amps

85.2 Watts

So what does this mean? It appears to mean Gemmy is not immune from typos. It also means you should verify any specifications that you get. If you use these rough numbers, you should be able to squeeze a bunch of inflatables on a single 15A circuit, but YMMV. :)

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are going to be adding anything to the Power Needs page you also might want some info on what gauge your extension cord wires should be what amps you have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose I should add that there's no free lunch here... if your inflatable pulls 51.6 Watts at 120V (0.43A), it should pull 51.6 Watts at 12V. But the current will then be 4.3A at 12V, not counting transformer losses. The transformer will still pull 0.43A at 120V though, not counting losses.

Maybe someone can call Gemmy to verify the details...

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I double checked the email that I posted my answer from and they say 12v. I just sent an email off to gemmy again to resend the list. I'm pretty sure it was just a typo but to be sure I asked again. As soon as I get a response I'll post back here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can definitely confirm that you can put at least 24 normal (6ft & 8ft) Inflatables on one circuit as long as you are not running anything else. It does not leave much extra room but it will work, I had to due this several times due to lack of power at my park last year, this year we have installed alot of extra services to fill the need for all the Inflatables I have.

On another note, the 6ft Gemmy Halloween Tornado Globes & 6ft Gemmy Rotating Globes are recommended by the instructions to pull around 200 watts each.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It took them long enough but Gemmy finally got back to me when I asked to double check the current usage of the airblowns. This time they didn't include volts, but the number look a bit high to me. I'm not an electrion but take a look and see what you think.

4 feet

Ampere during the work 0.58A

Watt during the work 70W

6 feet

Ampere during the work 1.06A

Watt during the work 128W

8 feet

Ampere during the work 1.39A

Watt during the work 167W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on the numbers, looks like they're using 120V. I just happened to think that the amount of power used will depend not only on the size of the inflatable, but also on the design. For example, a simple snowglobe should consume less air (and less power) than a tornado globe. Animated (waving) characters will use more than static characters.

Probably the best way to add up everything is to measure actual power usage with a meter. Someone posted a link to a wattmeter in the forums not too long ago...

At 120V,

2A = 240W

8A = 960W

15A = 1800W

20A = 2400W

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...