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Bulbs For Christmas Tree


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I tried to fix a burned out bulb on one section of my artificial tree. I replaced the bulb with one of those 2.5v bulbs from a 5 pack of lamps. All of the lights burned really bright and then blew out about half of the bulbs. I suspect that it was a super bright and I need something else. i found a bunch of bulbs on Bulbsamerica, but am a bit confused. The bulbs on the tree burn with a nice warm glow. Anyone know what (K) bulbs are? They also have (CEG) bulbs. Thought about using the lights from a mini string, but they are all super bright. Any idea what the correct bulb is I need? The tree section is 100 bulbs, 2.5v

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Simple.Look at the tags on the affected string for the wattage rating of the string. Say the string is a 100 bulb string rated at 42 watts {42 watts divided by 100 bulbs equals 0.42 watts per bulb} This is one of the most common wattage bulbs out there,but I have sets that also call for .25,.35..42,.50.and even .75 watt bulbs, so you must read the tags!!!!

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Ahhh. That explains it. The light string says .34A, 120V and there are 100 bulbs. The replacement pack says it is .42 watts. Hence my confusion. I do have some mini light strings 100 count, 2.5v .34A, so those should work I do believe.

Do I need to convert these to watts? 120v * .34A = 40.8 watts/100 = .408 watts per bulb? So still a bit confused.

thanks

Edited by schristi69
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your math is correct. The math works out even closer as far as choosing replacement bulbs if you use 125 volts vs 120 volts in your calculations..........125V X .34A = 42.5 watts/100 = .425 watts per bulb, hence the rating of .42 watts you see marked on the package of replacement bulbs

The reason using a figure of 125 volts in your calculations is more accurate than using the 120 volt figure is due to the bizzare way they rate the bulbs as 2.5 volt bulbs vs what they really see when in use in the string, which is 2.4 volts {120 line volts divided by 50 bulbs in a circuit comes out to 2.4 volts each bulb actually sees, not 2,5} 120volts divided by 50bulbs= 2.4 volts

Hope this helps!

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Yes, but now am more confused. When I used those 0.42 watt replacement bulbs it made the whole string light brighter. White instead of the yellowish glow and then a lot burned out. So now not sure what could have caused this. Thanks for the explanation though.

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thats puzzling.....and you are sure that in fact they are 100 light strings that take 2.5 volt bulbs? I could see this happening if they were 35 or 70 light strings that take 3.5 volt bulbs and you inserted 2.5 volt replacement bulbs into it.

Just to add to the puzzle, I have many 100 bulb strings that take 5.0 volt bulbs {the strings are manufactured as 4 circuits of 25 bulbs} they sure have not standardized these lights after all these years! Finding the correct packages of replacement bulbs can be a real needle in a haystack when you have to match both volt and wattage ratings,and even size sometimes!

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