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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Bob Moody

Waterproffing Rj45's And Rj45 Three Way Connectors

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What is a 4 letter word meaning heart attack ??? answer ..... rain ..

I thought for a moment I lost my J1Sys-D2 controller, power supply and 8 DMX North Poles.. Good news is.. all is fine .. The DMX controller box was on the same circuit as the LOR box for my yard grid and the GFI tripped.. and is remains so as of this writing (but thats another topic) ..

My 8 DMX North poles are built using the the Holiday Coro method for power injection along with 3-way spitters to daily chain them together..

I blew out any moisture in each of the connections but I did notice a few black traces in the connectors. Now I dont know if this is oxidation, or actual arcing of the DC...

BUT.. what I'm looking for is a best practice for keeping the rain out of the 3 ways. I know we dont like taping up connections.. but maybe a baggie taped at the top to act as a general umbrella?

I'm thinking of ways to redesign the data and power I/O but for now I need to add something to help protect..

Thanks for any input and feedback...

Bob

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I would suggest putting some di-electric grease inside each of your couplers or female connections. I've been using it on my "economical" removal bulb LED strings and the grease kept the moisture out and has prevented any corrosion issues.

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Dave and ... well .. Dave ..

Thanks for the tips.. I'll pick up some dielectric grease this after noon. That would be step one ..

I still need to at least make an attempt to protect the connections. Everything ran fine last night except the yard grid .. It tripped the GFI and I wasnt in the mood to play the find the damp socket game ..

Moderate winds and sunshine will take care of that for me today...

Thanks again ..

Bob

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The problem with trying to seal the connections is that any water that gets in, can't get out. Look at something like a demarcation box for your phone lines It is not sealed. Water resistant across the top and plenty of drainage. Just like you mentioned, it is an umbrella.

The plastic bag over the connections sounds like a good idea. As long as you keep it upright and don't seal the bottom.

Edited by cacoulter

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NAPA store directly across the street from my office.. have tube will travel ..

Now .. any tips for putting this stuff on an RJ45 insertion point?

Another thing I'm fixing to remedy is my cables. I make my own and as such the end of the cable is basically open (although inserted deep and WELL crimped.. ) I have a line on cables with the boots on them .. will add those as well ...

Bob

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That is a messy job. Fill the jack, put a little on the cable, insert cable, clean off excess. Try and shove the excess into the next jack. Or use CorrosionX (Holiday Coro use to sell it)

If you are using push through crimps, the ends will get covered with the grease. If you are using a capped end (old style), each wire end in down inside its own pocket. Not much room for water. If it concerns you, add a little grease before inserting the wires. On the existing ones, pack a little grease into the end.

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I've been using a side from a box of lights. Spread a "glob" out and use a "Q"-tip to dispense in the female connector, then insert your Cat 5 connector. If there is a substantial amount that oozes out, I try to use it at the next connection (not cheap stuff). Not something that you want on your clothes, stains badly

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Just put some on the male RJ. That'll be enough to prevent corrosion. I dont feel that it was ever meant to waterproof a connection.

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Pondering a question.

If dielectric grease is conductive, how do you apply it and not short out injected power and DMX signals?

Bob

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I othen wonder the same question when I have used it on my landscape lightas and trailer connection. But I also ponder other things that really dont matter. :unsure:

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We take 2 liter soda bottles and cut the bottoms off of them for weatherproofing our extension cords--don't know if that would work for your data connections or not.  We then stake the bottles down with a small stake like comes with landscape edging. (we make our own stakes out of the wire that is used for hanging acoustical ceilings).  It keeps the water out of the connections and keeps the gfci from tripping. 

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NAPA store directly across the street from my office.. have tube will travel ..

Now .. any tips for putting this stuff on an RJ45 insertion point?

Another thing I'm fixing to remedy is my cables. I make my own and as such the end of the cable is basically open (although inserted deep and WELL crimped.. ) I have a line on cables with the boots on them .. will add those as well ...

Bob

I had a tube of Red Gasket Maker still new in the package.  I used the "Nozzle" from it and screwed it on the Di-Electric Grease Tube.  Worked break, the small pointy tip fit right into every socket and worked PERFECT for my extension cords.  Not a single water failure last year.  Little late, but I hope this helps you out....

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