Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Tim Bateson

Garage Door Decor Warning

Recommended Posts

I used a Garage Door Decor this year - fantastic graphics... but  Beware that although it went up without issue in October, taking it down in the ridged January weather can cause it to crack.

 

After I first heard those bone chilling cracking sounds, I got it inside and laid it out to warm before attempting to roll it up.  There are a few cracks that I'm hoping with care will not grow next season.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next time try using an old hair blow dryer on the low setting.  And take down the area you heat up lightly first.  That should, with any luck, keep the door panel from cracking in the colder climates.   I don't have those issues, but if I lived in a colder climate where this could occur, this is what I would try to take the decor/door panel down without any, or the least amount of damage.

Edited by Orville Fugitte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha ha orvile you must not have ever be to a cold climate here we get so cold that a hair drier wont even heat the air above freezing also good luck blo dring a hole garage door that would take forever even if it got hot enugh ha ha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha ha orvile you must not have ever be to a cold climate here we get so cold that a hair drier wont even heat the air above freezing also good luck blo dring a hole garage door that would take forever even if it got hot enugh ha ha

No I have not.  However, just because I have not lived in colder climates, we do at times get below freezing temps in Florida, fortunately we have not had any recently.    And the OP was asking for suggestions and that is all I was giving.   So if it won't work in your climate, whose to say it won't work elsewhere. 

 

Again, it was nothing more than a suggestion.  And nowhere did I say it would definitely work in my reply, re-read it, I said, and I quote: "if I lived in a colder climate where this could occur, this is what I would try to take the decor/door panel down without any, or the least amount of damage."  And I also said "with any luck", insuating that it may not work, but if you don't try it, you don't know.   You're not heating up the entire panel at once, only small areas that the blow dryer would be able to cover and remove slowly.   It may work, but maybe it might require the higher setting, I have no way to test it because I don't live in an area that gets down to subzero temps, so it was just a suggestion, nothing more, nothing less.

 

Folks always want to laugh or insult folks before they bother to read the entire post or just don't get the point that it was only a suggestion because someone was asking what they might be able to try to accomplish a task.

Edited by Orville Fugitte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow orvile you have a really thin skin ha ha I just think you should stick to giving advice on things you actually know no offence bro just one decorator to another

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been able to take mine down for several years now without any cracking in sub-zero temperatures. Has something changed in the materials he uses?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry but I am NOT thin skinned despite what folks think.   

 

I am just tired of folks putting down or making fun of folks on these forums when they offer a simple suggestion, or try to help when someone asks for advice or suggestions as to what to try that might help them with their issue at hand.

 

Sorry, but your original post was not only insulting to my response, but I find it offensive when one tries to help another person out and gets laughed at because they may not live within the same climate as they do, but just trying to offer some suggestion as to what to try within those boundaries.

 

This post is not thin skinned, it is nothing more than a response for trying to help someone and the post could be taken as "ridicule" to the person trying to help the OP, which does not help the OP's situation at all.  And just makes everyone look foolish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry but it was just a ridiculous response it would be like I told you to drain the ocean with a bucket ha ha I dont live near the ocean but even I know you cant do that its the same way with a hair drier it is made to heat up air from like 70 deg to maybe 110 deg that is 40 degrees up when it is -10 out you're not even gonna make it to freezing ha ha no big deal just try not to get annoyed peace out im done with this thread

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my two cents:  Orville, I for one also now live in Florida ( But, grew up in the North/Cold) and I think your idea of a hair dryer was a least good idea.   You were trying to suggest a possible solution.  I did not see another idea mentioned or suggestion given by anyone else.  Keep up the good work of trying to assist others and offer your opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a possible stupid idea, how would using somthing like a few heated blankets draped over it for an hour or so before removing, it may give enough heat to at least not make it crack. Just a suggestion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For my two cents:  Orville, I for one also now live in Florida ( But, grew up in the North/Cold) and I think your idea of a hair dryer was a least good idea.   You were trying to suggest a possible solution.  I did not see another idea mentioned or suggestion given by anyone else.  Keep up the good work of trying to assist others and offer your opinion.

Thank you Baron14, at least you understood the point that it was a suggestion, and nothing more, just something to at least possibly try to help the OP with their situation.   Which seems to have flown completely past the other repsonders head, which they never offered any type of solution to the OP's situation.    All I could make of their responses was ridicule to someone who was trying to help a fellow decorator out, which wasn't productive to this thread at all.

 

If the OP ever happens to try it, and it would just happen to work, I guess someone will end up eating some crow, as the saying goes.

 

But it's posts like that one and ones that follow suit in the same mentallity that are actually putting me into going into just lurking on any of these type forums, and just not offering any kind of help publicly, but I would offer help or suggestions to folks, but it would only be through a PM and not out where anyone could read it or benefit from it, if it may have applied to their situation or worked.  I lurked for a while for quite some time in the past and only PM'd folks I knew had appreciated any help or ideas I posted, or the brand new folks on the forums that were getting some of the same kind of junk I was, which actually ran many a new person off those forums, never to return.

 

p.s. sorry the thread got hijacked like this, but it's really sad to see people have to post such responses when folks are trying to help someone out and noone had given any other ideas or suggestions at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is a possible stupid idea, how would using somthing like a few heated blankets draped over it for an hour or so before removing, it may give enough heat to at least not make it crack. Just a suggestion.

Sounds like a reasonable idea to me fasteddy.  And I like it.

 

But I'll bet if the same person that crapped on my idea sees it, may come back with laughing at you and saying that since it's so cold the blanket will freeze to the door panel or something like that, so now the OP will have to find a way to remove the blanket, then the panel.

 

Personally if you're blowing HEATED air or USING HEAT in a cold climate, I don't see how that could not work as long as you're close enough to warm/heat the object in small areas, remove and work around it.  Yes, it would take some time, but if you don't want to damage the item, wouldn't you want to take the time to remove it without damage?   As opposed to trying to pull it down too fast and destroy it?  I think either method has merit and both may actually work.

 

But then, I suppose that just isn't rational thinking, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally if you're blowing HEATED air or USING HEAT in a cold climate, I don't see how that could not work as long as you're close enough to warm/heat the object in small areas, remove and work around it. 

 

orvile I said I would stay out but you still ask why I said your idea wont work so I feel I need to come back and respond I already said why it wont work but i will try again a hair drier might put out 110 degree air in your house right?  So your house is like 70 degrees maybe.  So it raise the temp of air from 70 to 110 which is 40 degrees now if it is 0 degrees out if your lucky the hair drier is gonna put out 40 degree air by the time it hits the canvass on the door it isn't even gonna be above freezing believe me I have tried using hair drier to thaw out a frozen car lock before it doent work at all I thought I told you I wasn't making fun of your idea it just wont work and I was trying to save someone the time for trying something that wont work.  Now as for the heated blanket that might work but sounds pretty difficult to do but like u said I don't have any better suggestions other than don't use products that crack in the cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about throwing 5 gallon buckets of hot water on it to thaw it out might work

I live in California so dont have the problem when taking mine down

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Orville,

Why don;t you just get over yourself. You are giving this same response on just about every thread you hijack. Stop taking every response everyone makes so personally. It is getting real old. According to you, if someone argues a point you make it is "crapping on your idea"  and everyone is "laughing at you." 

 

If  it happens every time you post, who do you think is truly the problem?  Everybody but you? 

 

You keep threatening to go into " lurking mode" 

DO IT!

or just shut the hell up and stop being a little bitc#.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How about throwing 5 gallon buckets of hot water on it to thaw it out might work

I live in California so dont have the problem when taking mine down

That would probably work well for getting the decorations down.  However, when you are done, you are left with a driveway covered in ice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you thought about using one of those Mr. Heaters or some other kind of portable propane heater? I find them on craigslist pretty cheap all the time. You're going to want something around 18,000 btu at least, to make any difference and cover a larger area pretty quickly.

 

To put that into watts, there's 3.4 btu's per watt. So 18,000 btu's is almost 5,300 watts of heat.

 

Here's one of my favorites I always look for on CL.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200485294_200485294

 

When I lived in Northern Wisconsin, we had more than one form of back up heat as well as a 50kwh back up diesel gen set with a few thousand gallons of fuel. The cows MUST and WILL be milked. haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way to the first poster you will want to take care of those rips and cracks before you hang again get a good quality clear pack tape like 3M make sure it is clean and dry and carefully place it over the crack on both side do not skimp on a cheap tape get the good stuff and it will work well if you don't do this the crack will spread badly and you will have a destroyed item good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...