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  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
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Strictly Lights

Looking For Good Led's

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I use and like sealed lights.  I haven't had any issues with them.  I have bought and use Holiday Light Express and Magic in the Sky lights and have been very pleased with both. 

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First our pre sale is ending on Thursday, so now is the time to get great pricing. 

 

http://www.holiday-light-express.com/

 

Second, go with sealed bulbs. If you are going to spend the kind of $$$ on 50,000 LED's, you might as well get a better built product. 

The sealed bulbs are weather proof. No snow, water, ice, dirt, grime...etc can get in and cause you problems. No bulbs will pop out when you are installing them or removing them. Very rarely does a single bulb go out, usually its something in the strand itself that is the issue, which it wouldn't matter if the bulbs are sealed or not....

 

After installing many lights as a commercial installer, I can honestly say the sealed lights are much less problematic than anything else... If I found a solid replaceable LED strand that I was willing to 100% stand behind, I'd be selling it.

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You definitely want sealed bulb strings.  The replaceable bulbs are just going to give you extra headaches with moisture, corrosion, and bulbs coming loose or falling out problems.

Do hurry though as the presales are ending in the next couple of days.

 

You also want to get a few extra strings of each color for spares and you will end up using a couple of strings (over time) as sacrifical strings because you will get LEDs that will fail.  Youcan cut an LDE off a string and splice it into another string as a replacement to fix dead LEDs.

Also buy an LED Keeper tool for troubleshooting strings that do go bad.  It is just a fact that you will get some failures over time and be aware of it and prepared.  Although most of the dealers will stand behind a three year warranty so keep the receipt and some of the original packing and you can always have bad strings replaced for at least the first three years!

 

The best thing is to buy good quality for a bit more from a reputable supplier and you will minimise your chances of bad LEDs and problems with the strings as much as possible.

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Sealed bulbs are not better led's.

they are just sealed led's.

If they are so great and will NEVER rust, why don't they come with a lifetime warranty?

Even the Home depot lights come with 5 yrs. 

I have wire frames with sealed led's that are 4 yrs old. Guess which year SINGLE led's started going out. They corroded from the inside. sure would be nice if I could just pop in a new bulb with out needing a soldering iron and heat shrink tubing. 

 

Ever wonder why some are brighter than others? Put a multi- meter in line and check the ma draw. 

If a led is "happy" at around 20 ma, why are some sealed strings running over 30?

To be the brightest? 

I have noticed rumblings of blue lights going out. The ones I tested that are over 30, are both blue. 

 

 

"The candle that burns the brightest, is the quickest extinguished."

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Considering all the long time vendors here CHOOSE to only carry sealed LEDs,and have a history of supporting their customers after the sale speaks volumes.

 

Maybe they know something the new guy on the block offering UNsealed LEDs {his first time ever offering lights for sale,by the way} does not?I did not see anything on his site regarding any guarantees he is offering on these unsealed LEDs, did I overlook it? I hope the tinning of the leads in fact fixes the long term corrosion/rust issues so common on the replaceable bulb LEd sets,time will tell I guess.Who here is going to experiment with these?

Edited by merrymidget

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I am not saying that the above link lights are better than what the vendors have on these sites.

 

All I am doing is giving him another option. He has over 100k lights already. I am sure he is well aware of what the vendors here offer.

 

If I was buying 50k+ lights, I would avoid the middleman altogether and just get a quote from Ali express. 

 

Personally I have a hard time paying retail for anything, especially something that will be in the garbage in 5 yrs. 

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I have a lot of lights in my display. I started switching over to led's years ago. I'm not sure sealed bulbs were even an option back then. Like all of us back then we started having problems with corrosion, went through all kinds of crazy fixes, nothing really worked well. When sealed strings became available I jumped all over them to the tune of maybe 200,000.  Problems at first but for the last three or four years I have been very satisfied. That being said, I will have to say I have always thought that the ideal set up would be quality replaceable Led's. Just my two.....

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Ok, everyone will have there favorite vendor - mine is www.creativedisplays.com - I have purchased almost all of my 30,000 lights from them.  They have good prices year round, and also offer discounts at certain times of the years.

 

I have always received what is ordered in very good time and their support has been outstanding.  My first order did have a single set of lights fail on me, they did not give me a run around or do crazy things, they simply sent out a new set a.s.a.p.

 

The 2012 season saw me order 18,000 more lights from them and I had two sets that needed to be replaced (this stuff is all made in China) and again, no issues they simply told me to expect replacement sets a.s.a.p.

 

They are a family run business and I do recommand them if you want a really good supplier, I have also used christmasdesigners.com for light sizes or smaller quanties not available from creative displays.

 

That's my 2 cents on LED sources - enjoy the fun!  50,000 - and they say I am crazy - yeah sure, now I have to increase my lights again this year because I read this - what a hobby! :wacko:

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I have been thinking about LEDs--(low current draw & last a very long time but very high prices) vs incans (high current draw with limited life vs very low initial price).  Am I missing something here??  When people replace, for example, 50,000 incans with 50,000 LEDs, that is just a tremendous expenditure isn't it? In this example, the LED replacements would cost ~$10,000.  Is this another "eating the elephant" discussion where you eat the elephant one bite at a time and over the course of several very expensive years you end up with all LEDs?

 

Thanks in advance!!

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The main reason I switched to all LED lights was pretty simple,it took me up to a week to figure where I could plug my incad lights without my breakers tripping. 

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Between my Halloween and Christmas displays all of my M5 mini-light strings are sealed LED's and I have gotten them from a couple of different vendors.  I have used 1000bulbs.com, Reinders.com, and christmas-leds.com for my lights. The quality, brightness, and functionality all seem to be relatively equal IMO and have only had lights fail from one vendor (not one I listed).  All have great preseason sales and good prices throughout the season.

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I started with LEDs (mostly) by buying them off people on the various forums or retails sales around Black Friday or after Christmas. I'd say my average price is about $6 for a string of 50. If you wanted to buy 10,000+ lights all at once, obviously that wouldn't be a great option but after 3 years I'm up to about 7,000 at a fairly reasonable price.

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