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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
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  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
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  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
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  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
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EWTalley

Easy Arches

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I have tried the wraping method and looked at doing the sleeve method. About 4-5 years ago I saw a new method that I have been using since 2010. I don't know what it is called, but I will try to explain and show what it is. This also puts most of the lights on the front of the arches and if a section fails just cut the zip ties for that section and replace, no need to remove any other section.

 

1. Take a string of lights and go back and forth making a string about 16" long, this can be a 50ct or 100ct string of lights, use zip ties to keep them in place. Make as many of these as the number of sections for your arches. 

2. Take your arch pole and make your arch, ( I use 3/4 grey PVC and attach a cable from one end to the other for  3' high arches).

3. Take the 16" long sections of lights and zip tie them to the arch starting in the middle and working to each end. The lights can be adjusted however you want them.

 

Picture # 1 is the strings of lights, I used 2-50ct strings for each section.

Picture # 2 is the arches in storage, the cable is wrapped around the arch.

Picture # 3 is the arch with a section of rebar holding the arch in place.

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post-9379-0-26101700-1376681220_thumb.jp

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Never saw this method, but as we say in this hobby/obsession "what ever works and you like"!!!  If you can post a show vid on it that would be great.

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Kind of simple idea and would also like to see them in action.  That is what really tells the tale.

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Oh yeah, those arches look great.  Have a lot of your videos saved in my favorites.  May be retiring the sleeves and just do that.  Thanks.

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Very nice Earl.  Like your approach with the lights.   May actually try that instead of using the Holiday Coro Baby Sidewalk Arches I bought a few years ago and been using.    Will probably also add some nice green garland to the PVC just to hide any exposed areas of PVC during daylight hours. Wouldn't be too noticeable at night, but I'd just prefer to put some nice garland over the PVC.

 

Will definitely remember this method, seems to be the simplest and easiest way to do larger arches.

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Earle showed me these a couple years ago.  The best part is that they are easy to make and store away.  Like Earle said:  Use a steel cable between each end with a ring and spring clip so you can "un-arch" them for easier storage. Works great for me. Earle you rock !!!

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I really like this method.  I just finished wrapping 42 sleeve sections for a new set of arches.  This would have cut down the build to just a fraction of the time of sleeves.  Thanks for sharing such a great idea!

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This is the same method I used 3 years ago to run a "light beam" on a steel cable from the top of my mega tree to my nativity.  Used 16 sections to cover about 42'.  Worked great.

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Earle showed me these a couple years ago.  The best part is that they are easy to make and store away.  Like Earle said:  Use a steel cable between each end with a ring and spring clip so you can "un-arch" them for easier storage. Works great for me. Earle you rock !!!

 

I would like to know more about the cable and ring setup. Maybe some pics. Thank you

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This is the same method I used 3 years ago to run a "light beam" on a steel cable from the top of my mega tree to my nativity.  Used 16 sections to cover about 42'.  Worked great.

Are you the house that did disco santa ? With the Mega Mega Tree and the elvis song ?

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Great idea on the arches, 5 min repair, sweet ! Thanks

and your video comes out nice, I just can't seem to ever go a video to look like that!

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Looks great and excited to try this for next year.  How long is the 3mm cable and where can you get the spring and ring clips?

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Earle:  I have been doing long driveway arches for a couple of years now and they are a pain to store and maintain.  Even through  I can break them down into small sections they are still a lot of work. I am constantly repairing something and when the top of the arch is 10 ft in the air, it's quite a job just to find the problem.  This looks so much simpler.  Thank you for this suggestion.  By the way, would you be willing to sell your sequences for the arches?  They are amazing.

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Snowman,the trees are made with 30" 1/2" pvc pipe, with a hole drilled thru each pipe at the top and wired, the bottom also was drilled and a length of #9 wire put thru the holes and the pipe evenly spaced, then wrapped with lights. Each tree has 3 colors of 3 70 count m5 light strings. Total lights for the tree 630 X 16 for all the trees is 10,080.

 

tomko, the length of the cable will depend on how much of an arch that you want and the length of your pvc pipe. My arch is 3' high and the pvc pipe is 10' long so what ever length of cable need for that. All of the hardware that I use can be purchased at your local Lowes or HD, but I buy mine from the flea market it's a lot cheaper.

 

Christmasjunkie, I don't sell any of my sequences, I will send you some just send me your email address in a PM.

 

Earle

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Nice work Earl, gives me inspiration to build it for next year.

and your spiral trees are great!!! 

how about a tutorial on those? Are you using a 3D wire frame Star?

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Yes those are 3D wireframe stars, about a tutorial on spiral trees, I have a lot of pictures that were taken this year when I put them up, send me your email address in a PM if want to see them.

Earle

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Ewtalley sorry to change subject but I thought you had some info yesterday on a mini lazer light can't seem to find it today thanks Dennis

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