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  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.

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Dulahey

Lights Across Ridgeline?

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I ended up going ahead and getting the C9's.  I really want to do the roof!  My biggest question now is if I want to go through the major headache of painting over 500' of PVC....  or just leave it white.  I fear the white PVC will look ridiculous during the day lol.  Shingles are a dark gray.

300 feet wasn't too bad for my window frames.  Sawhorses and half a dozen cans of spray paint formulated for plastic.  Spray one side, let dry, then rotate 180 degrees and repeat.  I cut grooves in a 2x4 on top of the sawhorses to keep the pipe from rolling around.

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I'm wondering how bad it will scrape off moving them around on the shingles.  Even so, it would still look much better I suppose.

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I'm wondering how bad it will scrape off moving them around on the shingles.  Even so, it would still look much better I suppose.

Mine have held up fairly well.  All in using good paint I think.  I'd still do it if I were you, looks more professional imo.

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Did you clean or sand them first?

I wiped the dirt off.  Sand...Nah, I'm not that ambitious. lol

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Got all my lights and PVC!  Gonna be a busy November!

 

The only things left to figure out is some kind of code so I know what piece goes where in the coming years and to figure out how to connect the PVC at odd angles/splits.  None of the articles/posts I've seen have really showed custom splitters/angles.  I guess I could just drill a hole through the ends of the PVC and tie them together with some wire or zip ties?

 

Thanks again to everybody who gave their input in this thread.  Definitely helps a newbie out!

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I used to mark the underside of the PVC with a black Sharpie.  10 months later, exposed to the Florida elements, they seem to vanish.  For the most part, each section is fairly distinguishable where they belong on the roof.  You can drill holes (1/8") to signify which section it belongs to.  Use a clock wise patern or which ever one makes sense to you and which you'll remember during next years setup.

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Any tips on how to connect the ends of different PVC lines when they come together at odd angles?  Or especially when 3 or 4 lines all come together at all different angles?  I have tons of weird angles.  It will be pretty rare that I'll be able to simply use a 45° or 90°.

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If you are planning to secure your ridge runs and hip runs say every 8-19 ftm then making a hard connection with fittings is not necessary.

 

You could butt the pipes together at their intersection, drill a hole through each pipe and connect with zip tie.

 

Don't think you'll see any movement then

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I have very minimal ridges.  Almost everything are hips, so fitted connections seem darn near impossible.

 

The zipties-through-drilled-holes was what I was thinking too.

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Don't foget the valleys, they need lights too,  Instead of putting pipe extensions out of the fittings, I glue on a 3/4" end cap as stand-off feet.  Just the weight of all the lights gives it a nice friction fit and no need to s ecure

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Yeah, I'm definitely doing Valley's, they're the easy ones.  Just lay the pipe in it and the weight is supported by the gutter.

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I label all of my pieces using a label maker and use the A, B, C, D.....system to identify where each piece goes.  You can do a rough sketch of your roof with pencil and paper or on your computer then draw your PVC sections on that with the labels.  Sort of how you have directions for putting legos together or furniture.

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In terms of making the PVC fit your angles you have a few other options.  You can use a heat gun to mold the pipe to your oddly shaped roof or what I did was heat sand in my oven, poured it into the section of pipe, sealed it, then took it outside and molded it to fit whatever I needed it to.

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