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Best Way To Keep Blowmolds Standing When Ground Is Frozen?


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Any ideas?

I tried hammering a metal garden stake in the ground but no dice. Could use rebar but it's expensive and i can't pull it back out when the season is over. Grounds frozen here in NY and the wind won't stop. It's like hearing bowling pins fall on my front lawn!!

 

Any other ideas??

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Rebar isn't too expensive home depot has the 2 foot sections for $1.10. if not I used the 5 inch gutter nails. they were .17 a piece. I put a screw in the blowmold and tied a string from the blowmold to the nail and hit it in the ground. I've been dealing with bad wind on long island and I haven't had a blowmold fall over yet. the gutter nails come out easy as well.

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Up in the frozen wilds of Ontario Canada, I have all of my ground installed blow molds mounted on a piece of 3/4 plywood so about an inch of plywood is visible all the way around I drill a hole in each corner and then hammer a 10 inch spike into the ground. Never had a problem with them blowing over.

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There are several ways to secure molds. The easiest, if they have large enoigh holes in the bottom use bricks or bags of sand. On a side not i once broke my little toe when a brick fell out of virgin mary. If they have no holes or caps on the bottom (like some of the fetherstone ones) pour sand directly in them. But do not pour sand in hard plastic (injection) molds. I lost most of my toy soldiers that way. As far as staking molds, for smaller ones i used old tent posts and i also liked to use metal broom handles. Now gathering old broom sticks wont help you now and might require a bit of garbage picking. Just break off the bottom and you can hammer them in even when it's frozen. I never used rebar because once they are frozen theyre very hard to get out (at least with my weak girly arms) and it made me uncomfortable having them in the yard with the kids and dogd.

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I take the small rock you add to cement and put it in ziplock bags filled about half way. I then take out the light and slowly shake the bag with the rock in it so it falls in. Depending on the size it can take up to six. They do stay in place here in MA.

 

I also add bricks from the bottom if they fit. Thats easier and three to four do the trick. 

 

Good luck!!!!!

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I use 1/2 inch wood dowels to secure mine, had up to 40 MPH winds this year with no issues. I tried the metal garden stakes, but they just bent when I tried to pound them into my extremely rocky soil.

 

For blow molds that have the large holes in the bottom I collect old plastic bins from people who are throwing them away.  I use tin snips to cut them to the contour of the bottom of the mold, secure them with screws and cut a 1/2 inch hole for the dowel.  If the hole wears out and does not hold the dowel tight I replace it with a new plastic patch.

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If the soil is frozen and you want to get a round object in, do what I do:

1.  Get or borrow a 1/2" drill.  You'll need an extension cord (I'm guessing you have those, if you're posting here.)

2.  Put a spade bit in it that's slightly smaller than the rebar/stake you want to put in the ground.

3.  Drill a hole as deep as you can.  

 

At this point you'll likely have gotten deep enough that you're past the frozen-solid soil and can hammer your stake/rebar/whatever into the ground.

 

Best of luck.

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I use conduit and metal stakes. The conduit is cheap and can be bought in ten ft sections and cut to length. I usually tie the blow mold to it using zip ties or slide the mold over the top of the pole. Then I use the 5" nails to secure it to the ground .

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thank u all for all the amazing suggestions!! I didn't get any message alerts in my email to all these posts so just seeing now. We had a few random days the ground was slightly soft. So I found some metal 3ft tall garden stakes that are covered in plastic(buried in the backyard) and we pounded those into the ground. Slid the blowmolds over them and for the most part they held up well. I just started putting them away 2 days ago and we have been having some pretty high winds. Luckily no major catastropies!!

 

Thanks a bunch!!! :)

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I used the steel metal hanging straps screwed to the bottoms and use a stake or nail to hold in ground. You can cut the strap with a scissor. After the season you can take them off & reuse next year. I used that last year & again this year with about 60 blowmolds. Not a 1 down even with high winds.
Best part ---- You don't have shadows from using a stake in it or behind it.

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I board all mine I just use simple 1/2 inch plywood and i paint it black and use 2 to 4 screws in the bottom of each mold(screwing in the bottom does the least amount of noticeable damage to the molds) Then i drill 2 to 4 holes big enough to use ground stakes(just big nails i buy at Lowes or home depot they are about 35 cents to 40 cents depending on where you get them a piece) and just hammer the stake through the hole and mine stay all season long without any problems at all and where i live it is SUPER windy and they stay perfect....Im in Pennsylvania and not only is the ground frozen i have a ton of rocks in my ground and still no issues i hope this helps...The only down size is storage if you have a ton like me because they are a little bit harder to store with boards but other then that i have no issues...

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If they don't have a hole at the bottom, I would recommend putting a pole behind them and tie it to the pole. I wouldn't recommend dumping sand in the mold, because it it gets wet it will stick plus it will show this awful dark spot in the mold where the sand is. Plus, it can break the mold.

I have bought molds where people have had, sand bags inside or wood screwed to the bottom. I took both out, and just use poles. Some of my molds have been sandwiched between poles with a pole underneath and then tied to a pole behind it. Makes great for security measures as well.

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I screw (drywall screws) plywood to the bottom leaving an inch sticking out the front and sides then sticking out the back I leave about 8 inches and set a couple paving bricks on the wood we had 30 and 40 mph wind gusts and nothing fell over it saves from drilling all those holes and trying to pound stakes in the hard ground.

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I use wire spool ends.  You can get them for free at any electrical supply house.  Just go in and ask, in my experience they're happy to get rid of them.  They come in all diameters.  I bolt them onto the bottom of the molds with toggle bolts which won't pull through.  The weight of the base alone holds through most winds and if it doesn't, just toss a brick or block on the back lip of the base.  I like them too because it allows me to chain everything easily.  I just run the chain through the center hole that is already in the base.

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