Jump to content
Did you know?
  • The original Rudolph did not have a red nose. In that day and age, red noses were seen as an indicator of chronic alcoholism and Montgomery Ward didn’t want him to look like a drunkard. To complete the original picture, he was almost named Reginald or Rollo.
  • The Christmas wreath was originally hung as a symbol of Jesus. The holly represents his crown of thorns and the red berries the blood he shed.
  • The three traditional colors of most Christmas decorations are red, green and gold. Red symbolizes the blood of Christ, green symbolized life and rebirth, and gold represents light, royalty and wealth.
  • Tinsel was invented in 1610 in Germany and was once made of real silver.
  • The oldest artificial Christmas trees date back to the late 1800s and were made of green raffia (think grass hula skirts) or dyed goose feathers. Next the Addis Brush Company used their machinery that wove toilet brushes to create pine-like branches for artificial Christmas trees that were less flammable and could hold heavier decorations.
  • ‘Jingle Bells’ – the popular Christmas song was composed by James Pierpont in Massachusetts, America. It was, however, written for thanksgiving and not Christmas.
  • Coca-Cola was the first company that used Santa Claus during the winter season for promotion.
  • Hallmark introduced their first Christmas cards in 1915.
  • The first recorded date of Christmas being celebrated on December 25th was in 336, during the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine. A few years later, Pope Julius I officially declared that the birth of Jesus would be celebrated on that day.
  • Santa Claus's sleigh is led by eight reindeer: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blixen and Blitzen), with Rudolph being a 20th-century inclusion.
  • Outdoor Christmas lights on homes evolved from decorating the traditional Christmas tree and house with candles during the Christmas season. Lighting the tree with small candles dates back to the 17th century and originated in Germany before spreading to Eastern Europe.
  • That big, jolly man in the red suit with a white beard didn’t always look that way. Prior to 1931, Santa was depicted as everything from a tall gaunt man to a spooky-looking elf. He has donned a bishop's robe and a Norse huntsman's animal skin. When Civil War cartoonist Thomas Nast drew Santa Claus for Harper's Weekly in 1862, Santa was a small elflike figure who supported the Union. Nast continued to draw Santa for 30 years, changing the color of his coat from tan to the red he’s known for today.
  • Christmas 2018 countdown has already begun. Will you be ready???
  • Why do we love Christmas? It's all about the traditions. In this chaotic world we can miss the "good old days." Christmas reminds us of that time.
Ralph Priest

Odd Problem With Leds

Recommended Posts

As I was taking down my Christmas show, I noticed that one half of a 100 ct. C6 LED string was no longer lit. What is really puzzling is the unlit end is the lead--attached to the male plug. Half way up and past the resistor, the lights work just fine. So--what gives? BTW--these are pro quality lights and only five years old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same thing happen with the C9 LEDs I bought at Lowes. They were the blue labeled GE brand. Must have thrown out over 15 strands of 100 ct. All with same problem. Half way up burnt out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried using the LED keeper?  Twice this year I had the same issue you describe with LED icicle lights and the keeper helped me locate and replace the bad bulb in less than 5 minutes.  If your bulbs are sealed the keeper comes with pods you can use to fill in for the bulb you need to cut out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ralph, this is a typical failure of LEDs. If you  got  5 seasons worth out of them, I consider that about average for the life span. We demand a lot out of them, blinking tens of thousands of times a season.  As pointed out, it is either a bad bulb, or most likely the rectifier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks ZMan. I had already resigned myself to canning these lights; but, had hoped for a small miracle just the same. The issue that bothers me is the manufacturers claim a lifespan of many years when compared to incan.'s; but, I've found the opposite to be true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ralph, while vendor claims of LEDs lasting 20-25K hours may be fairly correct, remember something else. An LED is a DC component. To make it work when you plug it into an AC circuit, manufacturers have to put electronic components around it, and China builds it. If a cheap rectifier, resistor or cap goes, there goes the string. THAT is what most do not fully comprehend with LEDs. I have about 11yrs experience with them now and have seen all matters of failure, to include dead shorts from those components.

 

With that said, if you can isolate the problems to the rectification circuit, those are fairly easy to rebuild if you choose. Dennis Eaton (Eaton Puck) and others have come up with material to fix these. If it does turn out to be a specific socket/LED, you can isolate them with the LED Keeper and remove and replace the bub. Myself, I quite frankly, don't have the time to fix strings with my display logistics. So I just keep spares on hand.

 

I donate my failed strings to a local commercial non-profit organization, Garden D'Lights. They do a fabulous Christmas display and I used to volunteer with them. Again, my time has gotten so squeezed of late, the only help I give them is my failed strings and they in turn recycle them for $$. Keeps them out of our landfills. Something everyone should look into.

Edited by zman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also,I am now quite sure {from looking at pictures of other peoples displays on the net} that some {many?} strand failures are simply due to mechanical stress harsh winter weather often brings....I have seen pictures of strands covered in 1/2 ice,hanging from mega trees under their own weight plus the weight of all that ice,being subject to extremely high winds,etc......Something that many of use cant imagine in our own rather temperate climates{including mine}. The rather lightweight 22 gauge wiring and its connections to each and every LED takes a beating with all that tension applied to them! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again ZMan and MM, whatever the cause might be, it's almost certainly not weather related. Snow around here is about as rare as an honest politician.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Python,

 

For some reason the "Quote" response is not working.

 

Dallas and Sharon Graham, the couple responsible for that show are retired older folks. They are some of the best people you could ever meet. They have absolutely fantastic directions laid out to re-create every element of their display. It goes into incredible detail in how those flowers et al are made. It is quite impressive. We network at one level among ourselves, they network with the likes of Disney, Universal, Bush Gardens etc... for insight. I wish I had more time for that again, as it is a phenominal reward to see that come together, and it is all static.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...